Have you been meaning to get your little ones more involved and interested in science? Great – British Science Week is the perfect time to do so! 


British Science Week

British Science Week is a ten-day celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths. This incredible week is run by the British Science Association, who are encouraging people of all ages to participate in STEM events and activities.

They are hosting a number of events across the country if you’d like to take your child to one, but you can also get involved with British Science Week at home with the help of their free activity packs. You can view and download the activity packs here:

British Science Week Activity Packs >

If you have your own idea for a STEM event or activity, you can use the British Science Association’s networking platform Science Live to get other people in your area involved. The aim of this week is to get as many people involved in science as possible, so don’t be shy to engage with your community!

We think that this is a great way to get people of all ages involved in science. Hopefully, this celebration will spark an interest that leads to them pursuing careers in science industries too! Will you be doing anything to celebrate British Science Week this year? Why not take our quiz to find out what type of scientist you are?

Take Our Science Quiz >

On the 8th March every year we celebrate International Women’s Day, a day that promotes gender equality & celebrates the achievements of women worldwide. 

Female Scientist

As specialists in science recruitment, we wanted to celebrate women working in science, technology, engineering and mathematics industries this International Women’s Day. It is widely acknowledged that pretty much all STEM careers are saturated with male workers, but in recent years more women have been studying STEM subjects and pursuing STEM careers. Let’s take a look at some of the interesting statistics provided by The STEM Women Organisation:


Number of Women Graduating in STEM Subjects

These figures show that in 2016/17 more women graduated with STEM degrees than they did in the previous year across all core subjects! It truly is amazing to see an increase in the number of women taking an interest in science.

Women & Science in the Media:

One way that women are often inspired to pursue a particular degree or a career is through aspiring to be like other women they see on TV. There are a number of women in the media who, through their work as scientific TV presenters, are really inspiring other women to pursue science careers.

Liz Bonnin

For those of you who haven’t heard of Liz Bonnin, she is a TV presenter who has worked on a number of successful science and nature programmes. She studied biochemistry at university and later completed a masters in Wild Animal biology. In her TV career, Liz has presented over 50 primetime science and nature programmes including the incredibly popular BBC 1 documentary Drowning in Plastic. Liz has travelled the length and breadth of the Earth to pursue her career, and is a true inspiration to women.

Professor Alice Roberts

As an anatomist, biological anthropologist, author, broadcaster and Professor of Public Engagement in Science and the University of Birmingham, it’s safe to say that Professor Alice Roberts is an amazing role model for women who are interested in science. She has presented a range of science and archaeology TV shows and regularly tours the country to give lectures on her books and television programmes.

Miranda Krestovnikoff

Miranda is not only a biologist, but she is a specialist in natural history and archaeology and she’s a trained diver! This amazingly talented woman has presented a range of television programmes that showcase her extensive knowledge of these subjects, and she has authored two books. She enjoys motivating young people to love and care for nature in the way that she does, and she often visits schools and universities to share her message.

Aren’t these women truly inspirational! We think it’s great that women can use the media to not only promote science and conservation but also to show younger women that science is an increasingly gender inclusive industry. If you’re a woman on the hunt for a science-based job, take a look at the science jobs we have to offer by clicking the button below:

View Science Jobs on HRS >


Women in Science

The International Day of Women and Girls in Science, which takes place on the 11th of February every year, was created by the United Nations as part of the ongoing effort to address gender imbalance in core STEM subjects and promote the participation of women in scientific roles.

The Statistics

Across 14 different countries, the percentage of women graduating from universities with degrees in science-related subjects are as follows:

  • Bachelor's Degree: 18%
  • Master's Degree: 8%
  • PhD: 2%

These low figures are quite disheartening, as are reports that under 30% of scientific research and development roles are currently held by women.

The UN's International Day of Women and Girls in Science aims to encourage women and young girls to pursue an education or career in science and dramatically raise the above percentages.

Breaking Gender Stereotypes

To mark the occasion, we'd like to take a look at just some of the many prolific female scientists who have done vital work throughout history and helped to pave the way for gender equality in scientific fields:

Lise Meitner (1878-1968)

Lise Meitner was an Austrian-Swedish physicist who specialised in radioactivity and nuclear physics. Together with a select group of other scientists, she discovered nuclear fission of uranium - the basic principle of the nuclear weapons that were to follow.

Grace Hopper (1906-1992)

Grace Hopper was an American computer scientist. She was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark 1 computer, and she developed an early variation of the programming language COBOL which is still in use today.

Sandra Faber (1944- )

Sandra Faber is an astrophysicist specialising in the evolution of galaxies. Some of her important contributions to science include linking the brightness of galaxies to the speed of stars within them and helping to design the Keck telescopes in Hawaii.

Are you ready to pursue a career in science? HRS is here to help! Click the link below to browse a huge selection of science jobs spanning a variety of scientific fields.

See All Science Jobs >

If you are considering pursuing (or already working towards) a career in science, you might be curious as to which jobs can earn you the most money, making the hard work you put into studying worthwhile and providing you with financial security for the future.

Highest Paying Science Jobs

Specialists in the STEM industries (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) are constantly in high demand due to the rapid pace at which these fields develop and change. Therefore, you can be fairly certain that pursuing a career in any of these industries will have a reasonably good chance of leading to a fairly high salary.

But let's take a closer look at science jobs specifically.

The Highest-Paying Science Jobs

Of course, there are lots of different professions - from biotechnology to manufacturing - that could potentially fall under the 'science' umbrella, but here are some of the best-paid science jobs of all (salary estimates taken from nationalcareers.service.gov.uk).


Microbiologist

Starting salary: £26,250 per annum

Experienced salary: £99,000 per annum


Physicist

Starting salary: £14,000 per annum

Experienced salary: £70,000 per annum


Software Developer

Starting salary: £20,000 per annum

Experienced salary: £70,000 per annum


Pharmacologist

Starting salary: £25,000 per annum

Experienced salary: £80,000 per annum


Does a job in one of these lucrative science professions sound good to you? Click the button below to browse current science vacancies across the UK, or create a Candidate account to upload your CV and apply for jobs online!

Browse Science Jobs >

Bioanalytical Science Jobs

Bioanalytical science is a sub-discipline of analytical chemistry, which is responsible for implementing technologies to help gather quantitative measurements from xenobiotics and biotics within biological systems.

In modern bioanalysis practices, many scientific endeavours are reliant upon precise quantitative measurements of endogenous substances and drugs within biological samples for the purpose of toxicokinetics, pharmacokinetics, exposure-response and bioequivalence. The practice of bioanalysis can also be applied to environmental issues, anti-doping testing in sports, unlawful drug use, and forensic investigations.

Many techniques exist that allow bioanalytical scientists to gather the information that they need from molecules. These include:

  • Hyphenated techniques such as CE-MS (capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry) and GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry)

  • Ligand binding assays such as radioimmunoassay and dual polarisation interferometry

  • Nuclear magnetic resonance

  • Electrophoresis

Career Requirements

There are certain steps that you will need to take in order to gather the knowledge and experience needed to become a bioanalytical scientist:

  • Bachelor's Degree - A bachelor's degree in a relevant field (such as chemistry or biology) will be extremely useful when you're looking to pursue a career in bioanalysis, as you will have undertaken modules that involve laboratory components, providing you essential laboratory research skills.

  • Postgraduate Degree - A postgraduate degree in chemistry or biology is extremely advantageous and looks good to potential employers, but is not always necessary. A master's degree will provide you with further analytical and research skills.

  • Work Experience - Many employers require at least 2 years of experience for bioanalytical jobs. Candidates with a master's degree may not need as much work experience as someone with just a bachelor's degree. Experience can often be gained through entry-level positions within research facilities.

Once you have accrued the necessary skills, knowledge and experience to pursue a full-time career in bioanalytical science, we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions can help you to find a suitable role. Bioanalytical recruitment is one of our specialities - we work with some of the best science firms in the country to help fill vital positions in a variety of different organisations.

Browse Our Bioanalytical Science Jobs >

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