Britain

We have a proud history of scientific achievement and innovation here in Great Britain. A surprising number of watershed technologies were born on this island, and us Brits have always been well-represented across a broad spectrum of scientific fields, from astrophysics to zoology and just about everything in between.

Don't believe us? Here are 15 famous scientists who were born right here in Blighty (and all since 1900 - apologies to fans of Charles Darwin, Ada Lovelace, Alexander Graham Bell and other pre-20th century science superstars!):

 

Maggie Aderin-Pocock

Birthplace: London, England (1968)

Field: Astronomy

The first scientist on our list is also the youngest (although Brian Cox was born less than a week earlier). Maggie Aderin-Pocock is perhaps best known for hosting the current incarnation of long-running BBC series The Sky at Night, but she's not just a TV personality: she is an Honorary Research Associate in UCL's Department of Physics and Astronomy, and she's worked on a wide variety of projects over the course of her career, from developing landmine detection devices to managing the observation instruments for the Aeolus satellite.

Aderin-Pocock is also the Director of Science Innovation Ltd, an organisation that works to engage school-aged children in the field of space science.

 

Tim Berners-Lee

Birthplace: London, England (1955)

Fields: Engineering, Computer Science

If you've heard of Tim Berners-Lee, it's probably because he's the man who invented the World Wide Web in 1989. Without his world-changing work, you might not be reading this article right now!

But TimBL, as he's sometimes known, hasn't been resting on his laurels during the intervening three decades. He has worked with the UK government to help keep online information open and accessible, and he's been a key voice in the ongoing fight to preserve net neutrality.

 

James Black

Birthplace: Uddingston, Scotland (1924)

Field: Pharmacology

James Black won a scholarship to the University of St Andrews at the age of 15, and graduated from the university's prestigious School of Medicine - the oldest in Scotland - in 1946. In another life, he might have gone on to be a doctor, but he decided against this career path because he objected to the insensitive way in which patients were treated at the time.

Instead, Sir James Black is best known for developing propranolol and cimetidine, which are still used to treat heart disease and stomach ulcers respectively. He was knighted in 1981 and won the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1988.

 

Brian Cox

Birthplace: Oldham, England (1968)

Field: Physics

Professor Brian Cox is something of a household name these days, but in the grand scheme of things, it really hasn't been that long since the most notable entry on his CV was playing keyboards for D:Ream (on whose biggest hit, 'Things Can Only Get Better', he didn't even feature!).

It was during his music career that Cox completed a degree in physics at the University of Manchester. After that, he went on to get a PhD in particle physics, and nowadays he can be seen / heard on all sorts of science-themed TV and radio programmes. He has also co-authored a number of physics books, and he works on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.

Speaking of which...

 

Lyn Evans

Birthplace: Aberdare, Wales (1945)

Field: Physics

Lyn Evans, nicknamed 'Evans the Atom', was the project leader of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland until 2008. He actually spent his first year at Swansea University studying chemistry, only switching to physics in his second year because - rather amusingly - he found physics easier.

Evans has been honoured with a number of science awards since stepping down as LHC project leader, including the Glazebrook Medal, the 2012 Special Fundamental Physics Prize, and the IEEE Simon Ramo Medal.

 

Rosalind Franklin

Birthplace: London, England (1920)

Field: Chemistry

In 1951, Rosalind Franklin - already an accomplished X-ray crystallographer - became a research associate at King's College London. Famously, her work at King's would prove crucial to the discovery of the double-helix structure of DNA, the molecule that holds the genetic instructions for the growth and reproduction of every organism on planet Earth.

Franklin sadly died of ovarian cancer at just 37 years old. She was not nominated for a Nobel Prize in her lifetime, although her colleagues Francis Crick, James Watson and Maurice Wilkins won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1962, once DNA structure had been widely accepted as proven science. To this day, there is still debate over the degree to which Crick, Watson and Wilkins were taking credit for Franklin's work; as a result, she has become somewhat iconic of the discrimination that women in STEM fields face.

 

Isabella Gordon

Birthplace: Keith, Scotland (1901)

Field: Marine Biology

Dr Isabella Gordon was a leading expert in carcinology, the study of crustaceans (crabs and sea spiders were her particular speciality). During her 86 years of life, she worked at the Natural History Museum - no doubt a dream job for many British biology enthusiasts - received an OBE, and became a Fellow of the Zoological Society.

She also had the distinction of meeting with Emperor Hirohito while visiting Japan in 1961. The 'Grand Old Lady of Carcinology' (as she was posthumously dubbed) was invited to the laboratories of the Imperial Household and spoke to the Emperor, who was apparently something of a marine biology enthusiast himself.

 

Stephen Hawking

Birthplace: Oxford, England (1942)

Field: Theoretical Physics

What can we say about Stephen Hawking that you don't already know? BBC Earth have a great article listing Hawking's many scientific achievements (as well as the fact that he has appeared on TV shows like The Simpsons and Star Trek), so if you're not familiar with his work, we'd recommend starting there.

Stephen Hawking famously lived with motor neurone disease, which is why he used a wheelchair and communicated via American-accented voice software. When Hawking was first diagnosed, doctors estimated that he had approximately 2 years to live; that was in 1963, when Hawking was 21 years old. He eventually died in March 2018, a couple of months after his 76th birthday.

 

Peter Higgs

Birthplace: Newcastle upon Tyne, England (1929)

Field: Theoretical Physics

Ever heard of the Higgs boson? Peter Higgs is the man for whom that particle was named. He is a Nobel laureate who received the Prize for Physics in 2013 "for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles". (Higgs shared the award with Belgian physicist François Englert in a great testament to the collaborative, border-crossing spirit of modern science.)

Rather remarkably, Higgs was awarded honorary degrees by 15 different institutions between 1997 and 2015. He was even offered a knighthood just prior to the turn of the millennium, but unlike some of the other people on this list, he turned it down, expressing his cynicism towards the British honours system.

 

Steve Jones

Birthplace: Aberystwyth, Wales (1946)

Field: Genetics

John Stephen Jones was rejected by all of the Welsh universities he applied for, so he ended up going to Scotland and studying zoology at the University of Edinburgh. Years later, he would be made Head of the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment at University College London.

Jones published a number of books and presented various TV programmes on the subject of evolution. The study of snails has proven a particular area of interest for him. In 1996, he won the Michael Faraday Prize for his contributions to public understanding of science.

 

Mary Leakey

Birthplace: London, England (1913)

Field: Palaeoanthropology

British palaeontologist Mary Leakey is notable primarily for discovering the first fossilised skull of Proconsul, an extinct primate that existed approximately 25 million years ago and is now thought to be an ancestor of human beings. She found the skull on Rusinga Island, a small island in Lake Victoria (that lies within the borders of Kenya).

The Proconsul skull was far from Leakey's only discovery, though - over the course of her career, she discovered no fewer than 15 new animal species, and 1 new genus. In 2013, 100 years after her birth, Mary Leakey's face appeared on both a Royal Mail postage stamp and a Google doodle.

 

Anne McLaren

Birthplace: London, England (1927)

Field: Developmental Biology

Millions of people currently walking the Earth were born via IVF (in-vitro fertilisation). This technology, which first yielded results in the 1970s, has allowed many would-be parents to conceive children they would otherwise have been unable to have.

Dame Anne McLaren's work was instrumental in the development of IVF as a viable solution to infertility problems. She was an officer of the Royal Society - the first woman to hold the position - as well as a Fellow of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. She was sadly killed in a car accident at the age of 80, but her name lives on to this day: The Anne McLaren Memorial Trust Fund was founded after her death to support scientific study and events.

 

Alan Turing

Birthplace: London, England (1912)

Fields: Mathematics, Computer Science

Despite being dead for more than 60 years, Alan Turing was in the news recently when the passage of the so-called 'Alan Turing law' retroactively pardoned men who, like Turing himself, were convicted for their homosexuality. You might also remember the 2014 movie The Imitation Game, in which Turing was portrayed by Benedict Cumberbatch.

If you saw that film, you know exactly why Turing is so famous: his code-breaking techniques enabled the Allies to defeat Axis forces in a number of key engagements during World War II. Turing's role in the eventual Allied victory was underappreciated during his lifetime, and he tragically died of cyanide poisoning in 1954 after being convicted of gross indecency and chemically castrated by his own government.

 

Elsie Widdowson

Birthplace: Wallington, England (1906)

Fields: Chemistry, Dietetics

Elsie Widdowson was a highly influential dietitian who, like Alan Turing, did her most notable work during World War II. As you're probably aware, rationing was introduced in Britain during the war in order to ensure that food supplies didn't run out. Widdowson, together with her colleague Dr Robert McCance, was tasked with overseeing the rationing effort, making sure that people were getting the nutrition they needed even during extreme food shortages.

Widdowson and McCance are also known for heading up the very first government-mandated addition of vitamins and minerals to food (e.g. adding calcium to bread). She became a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1976, a CBE in 1979, and she died in 2000 at the age of 93.

 

Robert Winston

Birthplace: London, England (1940)

Fields: Medicine, Biology

Recognisable by his signature moustache, the Right Honourable Lord Winston has done a lot of work to get the general public interested in biology and medicine. He has hosted a litany of BBC series, including Your Life in Their Hands, Child of Our Time, The Human Body, and many more.

Robert Winston is also a medical doctor. He graduated from The London Hospital Medical College in 1964 and quickly established himself as an expert in human fertility. He actually performed the world's first Fallopian tubal transplant in 1979 (although this procedure is seldom used nowadays, having been superseded by IVF - see Anne McLaren, above).

 

Hyper Recruitment Solutions (HRS) is a British recruitment company specialising in science and technology. We have offices in Essex, Manchester and Edinburgh - use the links below to learn more!

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Many scientific jobs are based in laboratories, and even if you've experienced a lab environment in school or university, you might well wonder what it's like to actually work in a lab.

Working in a lab

Here are some of the best and worst things about working in a lab:

 

Lab equipment is expensive and delicate

In case you didn't already know, laboratory equipment tends to be pretty expensive. If you happen to be a bit on the clumsy side, you may find yourself racking up quite the replacement bill if you're not careful. Most science work requires concentration and precision, so take it easy if around the most delicate equipment if these aren't your strong points.

 

Your social life may have to take a back seat

When working in a lab, you commit yourself to the experiments you take on. Unfortunately, this can mean that your working hours become somewhat irregular, and other social activities have to be put on hold. Be prepared for your work schedule to be a bit changeable!

 

Your work can be dangerous

When you talk to your friends who maybe work within the construction industry or in factories, you may hear them say how dangerous their line of work is and how they could have an accident at any given time. When you work in a lab, the same thing applies to you! Working with infectious agents, caustic chemicals and electrified apparatus can put your health and safety in major danger, so be careful!

 

You actually have to dress like a scientist

You've most likely seen a load of lab work in movies or on TV, where the workers are dressed in long white coats with huge safety goggles protecting their faces. This is surprisingly true to real life - lab coats and goggles are part of the uniform, primarily because of the health and safety concerns mentioned above.

If you're looking for lab-based work, Hyper Recruitment Solutions can help you! Click the link below to browse the latest scientific from all over the UK!

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To stay up to date with all the latest science and technology stories, be sure to follow Hyper Recruitment Solutions on Twitter and Facebook!

The HRS team

Last night (30 May 2019), we held our annual awards night to recognise the outstanding achievements and unwavering dedication of the HRS team.

These were our 4th annual awards - the 2018 event was held on Lord Sugar's yacht (view photo), whereas last night's celebration took place at Savage Garden, a rooftop bar in London.

HRS team at the 2019 HRS Awards

The evening began with a drinks reception, and this was followed by the awards themselves. Our Managing Director Ricky Martin hosted the event, while Lord Sugar presented the awards to the worthy winners.

Ricky Martin and Lord Sugar at the 2019 HRS Awards

Once all the awards had been handed out, we sat down to enjoy dinner and drinks, as well as the stunning view from Savage Garden's roof terrace.

 

Who Won What?

 

HRS Award Winners

 

Newcomer of the Year: Alex Dobson (Recruitment Consultant)

Alex has a great personality, and he quickly established a mature attitude in his work with PIER. He is a clear advocate of the HRS values.

 

Consultants' Consultant of the Year: Georgia Walden (Senior Recruitment Consultant)

Georgia has really come into her own over the last 12 months. She's shown tenacity and determination not to give up. She is always extremely pleasant to work with and cannot do enough for others – even if it takes time away from her own work!

 

Supporter of the Year: Laura Fellowes (Marketing Assistant)

Laura is always approachable and willing to help and take on new challenges. Enthusiastic and energetic, she has grown tremendously in her new role as Marketing Assistant over the last 6 months.

 

Sales Success of the Year: Eve Hegarty (Recruitment Manager)

Eve changed 24 people's lives this year, supporting roles across 8 different UK locations.

 

Team of the Year: Chemistry

The members of the Chemistry team – Chris Sowden, Ben Wales and Ted McNulty – have achieved a transformational change this year, building a strong foundation of clients and enhancing the HRS brand.

 

Consultant of the Year: Georgia Walden (Senior Recruitment Consultant)

The biggest award of the night went to Georgia Walden – here's what management had to say about her performance over the past 12 months:

“It takes bravery and a willingness to evolve in your skills to change desks. Georgia has done this; she is a fantastic addition to the FL Group, and someone who I want to build a team around in the future.” – Andrew Davis, Recruitment Director

“Georgia has shown a real thirst for adventure across 2018/19, not afraid of the risks associated with stepping outside her comfort zone. She has proven that, no matter what level you are within the company, you can succeed if you want it enough. Well done Georgia, you are a shining example to your peers!” – Ricky Martin, Managing Director

HRS Award Winners - Group Photo

This annual award ceremony is an amazing opportunity for Ricky, Lord Sugar and the rest of the company to acknowledge the wealth of talent we have here at HRS. Each year, the awards get more and more competitive (not to mention busier due to our expanding workforce!) and it's always a joy to look back on the achievements of the past year.

This year's event capped off a particularly fantastic period for Hyper Recruitment Solutions. We've won two industry awards within the last 12 months...

...and now we're looking to make it a hat trick! We are on the shortlist for Global Recruiter's 'Best Small Recruitment Business' award, and the ceremony will be taking place on 20 June 2019 at the Café de Paris in London. Wish us luck!

Our Awards >> 

Would you like to join our life-changing team? Visit our Careers page to view our current opportunities!

Science jobs for students

Are you studying for some sort of science degree at the moment?

We know how hard it can be to find a job while you're a student (and immediately after you graduate), so in this blog, we'll talk you through some different science student job options that you might want to consider pursuing.

While you study

As a science student, there are lots of job opportunities you can take advantage of in tandem with your studies. Some of the best science student jobs include:

  • Internships

  • Volunteering at your university

  • A year in industry

There are lots of scientific companies - including engineering companies, science journals, research departments and more - who offer both paid and unpaid job opportunities to students. Even if these vacancies aren't advertised online, it's always worth enquiring!

You'll have to choose whether to work alongside your studies during term time or for longer periods over the summer holidays. Think carefully about how much time you need to dedicate to your studies and work from there. You don't want to let your studies suffer, no matter how beneficial work experience might be!

Whatever student job you choose to pursue will look great on your CV in the long term. Dedicating your spare time to a science job not only shows that you're enthusiastic about your chosen field, it also shows a willingness to work and an ability to organise your time that other students may not demonstrate during their studies.

How can HRS help?

Here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we offer a comprehensive science recruitment service that is ideal for science students who have recently graduated from university. We can help you to find and apply for a science job with ease - use the links below to browse our latest vacancies or read more about what we have to offer science graduates!

View All Science Jobs >   Graduate Careers >

Future science jobs

'Science' is a very broad term that can cover all sorts of different careers, from storm chaser to venom milker. Sadly (or luckily, depending on your outlook), not all scientific jobs will involve such white-knuckle thrill-seeking or death-defying excitement.

Nevertheless, jobs in science can make for an excellent career path with many intriguing avenues to explore. Better still, with the entire science industry built on constant change and cutting-edge technologies, the future of science jobs is an exciting and potentially lucrative one, particularly if you choose one of the following fields...

Science jobs on the grow

If you're on the hunt for science jobs, you're probably familiar with the term STEM – an acronym relating to jobs within science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Many STEM jobs are hugely important in modern society, and that's likely to remain the case for a very long time to come.

With one eye constantly on the road ahead, science is an industry that holds much promise for the future, so it’s only fitting that the future should also hold much promise for jobs in science. In fact, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labour Statistics, there are certain areas of scientific employment that are predicted to have a very healthy upswing indeed by 2024.

Forensic Science Technician

Glamorised by TV shows like CSI, NCIS and Dexter, the presence of forensic science on the small screen has made a career in this field a rather attractive proposition in recent years – and it’s easy to see why. Arguably one of the meatier jobs on this list, the role of Forensic Science Technician has a number of specialist sub-categories, including DNA, textile fibres and toxicology.

The work itself, however, is somewhat less glamorous than what’s presented on television, typically requiring you to analyse crime scene evidence and summarise your findings in a written report. For this role, you will likely need at least a BSc in Forensic Science or Chemistry and first-hand work experience to boot.

Atmospheric Scientist

One of the more adaptable roles on this list, a job as an Atmospheric Scientist can have you working in a variety of fields relating to the atmosphere. This role could see you studying meteorology and weather, but you might just as easily end up working in public health, focusing on air quality and the impact of pollution.

In order to be considered for a job in Atmospheric Science, you will first need to obtain a degree in – you guessed it – Atmospheric Science. This will provide the opportunity to apply for entry-level positions; however, for the best chance of securing a role in this field, a master’s degree or PhD will give you an extra advantage over other candidates.

Geoscientist

Further delving into the geographical science path, Geoscience investigates the topographical features of the Earth. As a Geoscientist, you can’t be afraid to get your hands dirty because you could find yourself working with soil, rocks and other natural resources in the study of the Earth’s composition.

Often dealing with natural resources such as gas, oil and water, Geoscientists are frequently employed in the energy industry, as well as sectors such as water management, etc. There are also a variety of sub-categories relating to particular specialities, ranging from geophysicist to geochemist and many more in between.

In order to become a Geoscientist, you will likely be required to have a BSc in engineering, physics or chemistry at the very least, while a master’s degree and relevant industry experience in the field is often preferable for employers.

Biomedical Engineer

Biomedical Engineers are tasked with analysing and designing solutions to issues within biology and medicine. This can often involve the design of various biomedical systems and products, including artificial body parts and machines for diagnosing medical problems, as well as a number of other duties surrounding biomedical equipment.

As one might expect, you will typically require a bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering in order to become a Biomedical Engineer; however, you may also be able to work within this field if you have a BSc in an alternate area of engineering, coupled with a graduate degree in biomedical engineering or relevant/adequate first-hand experience.

Computer and Information Systems Manager

A highly technical role of much importance within a business, a Computer and Information Systems Manager is tasked with managing an organisation’s computer activity, taking the reins for all the hardware and software decisions of a company.

As this is a managerial position, you may also have to oversee the other IT personnel on staff, as well as being responsible for the company’s network security. For this role, you will typically need to be educated to degree level in Computer and Information Science and have several years of relevant work experience in support of that degree.

So there you have it: if you’re looking to enter the world of science with a career that will last long into the future, these five future jobs in science are well worth aiming for.

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