With almost half (49%) of UK workers having signalled an intention to move jobs in 2016 – according to an Investors in People survey as reported by LondonLovesBusiness.com – it is surely inevitable that even many of those in the most rewarding science jobs will have occasionally considered quitting.

People decide to move on for all manner of reasons – so here are five of the things that you may be doing that could be contributing to your own firm’s staff attrition.

Micromanagement

Whatever science sector your organisation may be involved in – perhaps pharmacology, clinical, medical devices or something entirely different – you won’t make your employees happy by continually micromanaging them.

There’s a good reason why your staff are trained and experienced to such a high level – they need to be if they are to do their jobs, so you should give them the space to fulfil their duties.

A lack of the right tools

For some science roles it may simply be standard office supplies that are required, whereas for others, there may be a need for much more specialised equipment.

Whatever the situation, your staff should have the tools that enable them to do their jobs in the safest and most competent manner possible.

Poor morale

Ultimately, a business is about not just the building in which it is based, but also its people and the morale among its employees. Unfortunately, however, all too many managers are intimidating, communicate poorly and don’t provide their staff with an adequate work/life balance.

Your employees need to feel that they are in an environment in which they will be appreciated and rewarded for their hard work – otherwise, don’t be surprised if they look for other science jobs.

Favouritism

Treating certain staff or departments more favourably than others – whether that means providing greater resources and attention or simply not placing the same demands upon them – is another sure way to breed resentment.

Indeed, those within your team who may be willing to take on more responsibility or work overtime may be effectively punished for this through a lack of managerial support.

Too many meetings

If your staff members are being constantly distracted from their core duties by meetings, how can you expect them to be productive and happy workers? At the very least, any meetings that you do hold should have a definite sense of purpose, with an expectation that real changes or improvements will be made as a result of what was discussed and someone will be held accountable for it.  

But all too often, certain science organisations hold meetings for the sake of holding meetings and nothing changes in how the firm works, other than employee disillusionment.

The discovery earlier this year by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) that UK workers’ job satisfaction was at a two-year low – as reported by The Independent - should make it even more obvious that your staff must be managed well if you are to get the best out of them.   

When you require a reputable science recruitment agency with the ability to provide all manner of tailored recruitment solutions, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Hyper Recruitment Solutions. We are also trusted experts in candidate screening and are fully compliant with current recruitment and employment law, so we really can bring you the complete service.

Continual development and innovation in medical devices is crucial to ensuring quality of life in the UK and across the world. The term ‘medical devices’ is naturally an extremely broad one, encompassing such items as syringes, wheelchairs, pacemakers, X-ray machines, orthopaedic devices, coronary artery stents and many more.

Regardless, there can be little doubt about the field’s great importance in safeguarding the wellbeing of our increasingly health-aware population.

It is thanks to medical devices that diseases can be detected earlier and diagnoses, treatment and patient monitoring relentlessly improved. Breakthroughs and refinements in medical device technology have also been crucial for reducing the costs of healthcare at a time when health services around the world – not least the NHS – seem to be under greater financial pressure than ever.

What is the state of the UK medical device industry today?

A quick glance at the key statistics relating to the UK’s present medical device industry should serve to further underline its importance. According to the Association of British Healthcare Industries (ABHI), the UK medical technology sector was made up of more than 2,000 companies as of 2009, with four-fifths of those being small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Emergo has said that the UK medical device market was valued at $9.9 billion in 2008, making it the third largest in Europe behind Germany and France. About 50,000 people are said to be employed in the sector, which is also trade positive in the UK, exporting more than it imports. It is a key part of a wider life sciences industry that has been hailed as one of the key contributors to the UK economy. 

However, ABHI has also said that “action is needed if the UK is to continue to thrive in this area and patients are to realise the full benefits of medical technology”. Furthermore, it’s clear that with many of the most exciting and lucrative science jobs today being in medical devices, science recruitment agencies like Hyper Recruitment Solutions have a crucial role to play in helping to match the right talent to the right medical device industry vacancies and employers.  

What you need to know if you are interested in a medical devices career

Although medical devices tend to be based on mechanical, electrical and/or materials engineering, which will place those with qualifications in any of these fields at a distinct advantage, prospective entrants to the sector are also expected to have a strong biological and biological sciences background.

The skill-set that you will require to succeed in the medical device sector will depend largely on the specific job in which you are interested. While, for example, a research and development role may place an emphasis on strong engineering skills, if you are to be tasked with the management of a team of people on a project, ‘softer’ skills like communication and team leadership will be crucial.

Meanwhile, ‘people skills’ and a willingness to travel are prerequisites for those working in the sales side of the sector, as is a high level of knowledge in – and enthusiasm for – the devices that they are to be responsible for selling. 

When seeking your next big role in the medical devices industry – whether it will be your first or the latest of many – you shouldn’t hesitate to draw upon our considerable sector-specific expertise here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, including in such sub-areas as quality assurance, quality control, regulatory affairs, manufacturing, validation, clinical trials or any of a wide range of others.  



For both the leading science recruitment agencies and the employers that they serve, relevant work experience isn't a mere 'nice-to-have' on a candidate's CV - it could be the key factor that triggers offers for the most desirable vacancies.

Numerous surveys have served to confirm this down the years, with one such study last year finding that 58% of polled employers rated work experience as "the most popular qualification among those presented." Ranked second was a student's personality, cited by 48% of those quizzed.

But why, for science jobs in fields as wide-ranging as energy, clinical, telecommunications and more, is work experience - and in particular, relevant work experience - so highly valued by employers?

The right experience shows readiness for work

The most compelling reasons to ensure you get plenty of work experience on your CV before sending out your CV for all of those mouth-watering science jobs may also be the most mundane.

The truth is that your studies, as relevant for your specialised intended career as they undoubtedly are, do not - in and of themselves - indicate that you are prepared to walk into an organisation and start making a difference in that prestigious and rewarding role straight away.

You may possess a high level of knowledge in chemistry, immunology or pharmacology, but are you able to be punctual, present yourself well, organise your workday duties and take on a high level of responsibility, including making independent decisions if the circumstances demand it?

You may feel that you can respond with a "yes" to all of these questions, but only a record of past work experience - whether gained on a placement or more informally - will convince many employers that you can do so truthfully.

But work experience isn't just for pleasing an employer...

There's no question that relevant work experience can help to convince an employer that you will be a reliable and productive employee if they do hire you. Candidates with work experience are more likely to be able to work effectively as part of a team, gain a quick grasp of how an employer operates and commit to an employer for a certain period of time - among many other things.

However, you shouldn't merely think of relevant work experience as a way to attract more interviews for science jobs. That's because you should also use such experience to fine-tune your own understanding of the career path that you would like to pursue, as there are certain insights into the day-to-day realities of work in a given science field that only direct experience can bring.

Remember, too, that working in an organisation like that in which you aspire to gain salaried employment in future can be invaluable for building those early contacts that could - directly or indirectly - lead to a job offer. However, such contacts can also be crucial in simply giving you important insights into what truly awaits you if you decide to pursue a given science career path.

For the sake of ensuring that you apply for the right science jobs, as well as better stand out from the competition when you do so, acquiring work experience - the more relevant, the better - will always be strongly recommended by the leading science recruitment agencies like Hyper Recruitment Solutions

You will have acquired or developed a wide range of invaluable skills and experience as part of your biochemistry degree, including specialised skills such as the ability to understand complex biological processes, as well as many more general skills like numeracy and communication. But what happens once you have graduated and have to head into the wider science jobs market?

In truth, you may not feel ready to apply for science roles straight away and indeed, many of those wishing to pursue bioscience careers undertake further study such as a PhD, which is essential for academic research. Alternatively, you may decide to enter the general graduate jobs market or look to gain professional qualifications in a non-science field like teaching, law or finance.

What if I would like to become a biochemist?

As one of the most respected science recruitment agencies in the UK, Hyper Recruitment Solutions is here to provide you with all of the assistance that you require to secure a rewarding role in biochemistry after you graduate, encompassing CV and interview advice and actual advertisements for biochemistry vacancies.

As with other science jobs, work experience can play a big role in helping you to secure your dream role. You will have already developed practical and technical skills through the laboratory-based work and final year research project of your biochemistry degree, but you may further boost your marketability to employers by acquiring relevant work experience, such as in a research laboratory as part of a summer internship.

Developing your biochemistry career

Once you have secured a biochemistry role, you will develop your skills on the job, possibly as part of a structured graduate training programme provided by your employer. You may also seek to reinforce your professional scientist status and keep your biochemistry knowledge up to date through membership of a professional body, such as the Society of Biology or the Biochemical Society.

Your work as a biochemist will mainly take place in a laboratory, working from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday. It may be required in some jobs to work shifts, as well as for longer hours during busier periods. Many biochemists also work on a part-time basis.

How much could I earn as a biochemist?

As detailed by the National Careers Service, trainee clinical biochemists on the NHS Scientist Training Programme can expect to earn a salary of around £25,000 a year, from which point, the NHS's Agenda for Change (AfC) pay structure applies. Qualified clinical biochemists in the NHS, for example, start in Band 6, earning between £26,302 and £35,225. With experience, you will have the option of applying for Band 7 jobs commanding salaries of up to £41,373.

Postdoctoral researchers and research fellows, meanwhile, can command salaries of £29,000 to £36,000 a year, and for research scientists in industry, the guideline wage is between £23,000 and £42,000 a year.

With biochemistry graduates employed by various other public sector organisations such as the Environment Agency and government departments, as well as across a wide range of companies in such industries as biotechnology, agriculture, food and water, there's no question that a biochemistry degree can stand you in extremely good stead in your search for science jobs.

Talk to our experts here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions today about the best next steps to take after graduation. 


The fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) industry concerns goods that make a quick transition from the production lines to supermarket shelves, including food and drink, home cleaning, personal hygiene and similar items.

 

The sector certainly offers plentiful opportunities to those seeking rewarding science jobs, having been worth more than $570.1 billion as of 2015, according to The Telegraph. But what are five of the best reasons to pursue a career in FMCG?

 

1.                   It's the home of the leading brand names

 

Companies recognised the world over – such as Unilever, L'Oreal, Dove, Dettol and Walkers – are all involved in the FMCG sector, whether focused on multiple or single product areas, so securing a job in this industry enables you to be at the forefront of the latest developments instigated by the leading brands.

 

2.                   It's a highly innovative industry

 

The pressure to continue attracting consumers and fulfilling their requirements amid intense industry competition has long made FMCG a key frontier for innovation. There is always the need for fresh and exciting ideas relating to product packaging, advertising, marketing and communications, and you could be at the centre of this ever-evolving process.

 

3.                   It offers plentiful employment opportunities

 

Employment prospects in FMCG have long been strong – even during periods of recession. The sector is, after all, closely connected to retail, a sector in which 2.8 million people were employed in the UK in 2015, according to Retail Economics. However, graduates in chemical, civil/structural, control and electrical engineering disciplines are also continually sought-after by the industry's employers.

 

4.                  It's a diverse sector

 

As a matter of fact, such is the diversity and dynamism of the FMCG industry that graduates from any degree background are welcomed, which marks it out from many of the other sectors that we serve as a science recruitment agency here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions. Whatever degree you studied, there are opportunities for you to gain employment and make an impact in this exciting industry.

 

5.                  It serves consumer needs

 

If you like the idea of a career that makes a difference to ordinary people's lives, an FMCG role could be a good match to your values and ambitions. There will always be a need for affordable and available consumer goods ranging from toiletries and other consumables to stationery and over-the-counter medicines, and with every person in the world being a consumer, your work will be essential to satisfying this demand.

 

Secure that dream FMCG role with Hyper Recruitment Solutions

 

The FMCG sector may be just one of the many that we serve here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, also including the likes of pharmaceuticals, biotechnology and telecommunications, but we can nonetheless make a big difference to your ability to land a rewarding job in this important sector.

 

Our science recruitment agency was founded by Ricky Martin in partnership with Lord Alan Sugar, and provides the services – including CV writing tips, interview advice and advertisements of the latest FMCG job vacancies – that will help you to begin or further your FMCG career. Contact us today about our widely acclaimed recruitment services and expertise. 

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