It's one of the big questions that you will ask yourself during your life: how do I find my dream job?

It's not necessarily as simple a question that it sounds, even for those who already know their interest is in jobs. After all, is your idea of a 'dream job' something that you love and are good at, or is there a specific ambition associated with it, such as a certain lifestyle or salary?

Here are five of our favourite tips for landing your ideal role in 2016.

1. Go on a journey of discovery

What is it that you actually want in a job? What are you passionate about? To what kind of jobs (or indeed, any jobs) do your existing skills and interests best match, and if you are deficient in any area, what do you need to do next?

Assess yourself with career tools like those of the National Careers Service, research particular fields like immunology, chemistry or clinical work, get in touch with experts in your desired sector about how to break into it... there's plenty that you can learn with little more than a computer and an Internet connection.

2. Focus on steady, incremental progress

Many people may have yearned for a job change for years, only to find themselves procrastinating over actually taking the steps to get there.

You don't need to turn your career on its head with a day or week - instead, focus on smaller things, such as attending a relevant event or registering with a recruitment agency, that will help you steadily towards your goal.

3. Don't think only about the money

There's a saying that if you find a job you love, you will never work a day in your life.

It's true in many ways. While you obviously can't completely discount the money element, allowing it to dominate your job search is rarely a reliable way to find your dream job, which is - after all - the whole objective behind this article.

4. Gradually ease into your new career

Unless you are a recent or soon-to-be graduate or have sufficient financial backing to undertake a long unpaid internship in your desired role, and certainly if you already have a steady job, you may be reluctant to make the big jump into a new career.

The good news is that you don't have to - indeed, it may be best for you not to risk everything. Don't feel guilty about keeping your steady existing job for now while taking a part-time course, volunteering or work shadowing to explore your potential career change.

5. Be realistic about what constitutes a 'dream job'

Even the most popular and well-paid jobs have their positive and negative aspects, but at the same time, don't lapse into thinking that literally any job that pays is a 'dream' one.

No job situation is absolutely perfect, but there are definitely roles that will make you feel more rewarded than others.

Keep an open mind, prepare to work hard and contact one of the leading recruitment agencies, Hyper Recruitment Solutions about how we can power your career to new levels of success in 2016!  

It seems almost impossible these days to avoid social media, and indeed, many of us - particularly the Millennials who have grown up around smartphone and tablet communication - routinely use social networks for both personal and professional purposes.

However, while 73% of 18 to 34-year olds found their last job through social media, it's also true that 94% of recruiters either already use social networks for recruiting or plan to do so.

That makes it extremely important for those hunting for science jobs - in sectors ranging from biology and chemistry to pharmacology and immunology - to have a social media profile that says the right things about their professional self.  

The big difference made by social media to your job search

It's been a long time since LinkedIn was the only social media platform used for professional purposes, with Facebook and Twitter by no means merely the homes of amusing cat pictures or frivolous celebrity tweets.

The truth is that, whatever social media platforms you are active on - Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram and/or various others - everything that you say on them contributes to your overall 'employee brand'.

That means even those rants about late-running trains or annoying relatives count - and they don't necessarily reflect well on you. Even worse, however, is when your professional life is the subject of those rants - with those tweeting about a bad day at work risking the loss of their job.

Focus on LinkedIn - but not exclusively

While it is important to pay attention to everything that you say across all of your social media accounts - just like the most eagle-eyed recruitment agencies will be doing when considering your candidacy - the most attractive LinkedIn profile is a particular must-have.

After all, from a professional point of view, LinkedIn remains the most important social network, with 48% of recruiters making it their sole focus for social outreach. Some employers have been completely ditched CVs in favour of LinkedIn recruiting.

So, remember to complete your LinkedIn profile as much as possible, ensure that you refer to the same job title across all of your social communications and always challenge the appropriateness of whatever content you post.

The stakes are high in today's social media world

Being professional may be easier on LinkedIn, but on less career-oriented social platforms, it is much easier to suffer those all too common lapses that may cost you the chance of your dream role - perhaps without you even knowing.

Do you want to ensure that you are in the best position possible to compete for the very best jobs in 2016?

If so, explore the different fields that we cover, read about our complete Candidate Commitment and get in touch with our experts here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions today. 

The established wisdom in job interview preparation is that while dressing well will never overcome deficiencies in what you actually say in front of a prospective employer, it can nonetheless play a big role in projecting a more positive image of yourself.

Indeed, there have even been indications recently that the saying "the clothes make the man (or woman)" has more truth to it than many of us realise, a study cited in The Atlantic finding evidence that people's thought processes change when they wear a suit.

So, you might know the importance of dressing smartly when being interviewed for jobs - but what exactly does that entail?

How suitable 'interview wear' differs between the sexes

The basic rules of interview dress arguably don't change much whether you are a man or a woman - you are still best advised to wear something comfortable and that you actually feel confident in. It's a good idea to go for 'safer' colours like black, not using more than three colours across your entire outfit, while you should also pay attention to all of those 'small' aspects, such as shoes and socks.

Beyond these broad principles, if you are attending an interview for a role, whether it is in chemistry, pharmacology, immunology or a different scientific or technical field altogether, you will almost certainly be expected to dress more formally than the 'business casual' that can be prevalent in interviews for other job sectors.

What men might wear to a science job interview

A good rule of thumb is to dress one level more formal than would be expected in the day-to-day job. For men, that often means opting for darker, more sober colours, choosing cotton instead of linen on account of the latter's tendency to crease easily, and brown or black shoes - leather rather than suede.

Colours are an important consideration for men, which at the most basic level, means avoiding distracting or garish ties and socks. Also give thought to colour combinations and coordination - while blue can be made to work with brown, the same cannot be said of black and brown.

Some good dress pointers for women

Suits aren't merely timeless - they also effortlessly cross gender lines. Further down one's outfit is a different story, with women needing to choose between trousers and a skirt. If opting for the latter, the distance between the hemline and the knee should not exceed the length of one biro.

Women, like men, are advised to wear darker colours like black, navy or brown, although a lighter, plainer colour can be a good choice in the summer. Scarfs can also be a source of brighter colour, but patterns anywhere are generally a no-no. Any blouse is best plain, and heels should not be too high.

While many would reasonably argue that there are no hard-and-fast rules governing what to wear to an interview with a recruitment agency, the above should nonetheless constitute sound guidelines for the many of us who consider the thorny issue of interview wear almost as intimidating as the interview itself.   


In today's highly competitive jobs market, it's common for employers to have many highly suitable candidates for just one or two positions. This naturally raises the question of how they can better separate candidates, to which one of the most obvious answers is to ask more challenging interview questions.

As there's no substitute for preparation for your own next interview, here are 10 of the most difficult questions that you may be asked, and how you may best answer them.

1. Can you tell me something about yourself?

This is a question where it is so easy to slide into endless irrelevant talk about where you were born, your parents, childhood, family, personal likes and dislikes and so on. Instead, pick out brief examples of your personal and professional experiences that make you suitable for the position - or even have a 'lift pitch' ready to deliver.

2. Why do you think you would be successful in this job?

Don't just wander into general boasting about how brilliant you are - remember that this is a very specific question about what makes you suitable for this job, as opposed to others. Match your strengths to the characteristics that are outlined in the job description and person specification.

3. Why are you leaving your present job?

Like many questions that you may be asked by those conducting recruitment campaigns, this isn't too tough a question if you prepare well. Talk about the personal and professional growth opportunities, challenge or excitement of taking on this position, rather than whinging about your present or last employer.

4. Have you ever had a bad experience with an employer?

There are two big risks with this question - criticising a past employer or incriminating yourself in relation to that bad experience. If you can't truthfully say that you have never had a bad experience with an employer, at least describe a difficult situation that you emerged stronger from as a way of demonstrating your potential now.

5. What are your most and least favourite aspects of your present job?

Be more specific than just citing "a nice atmosphere" - something that relates to the position, such as your enjoyment of teamwork, is ideal. As for least favourite aspects... try to make it something as far away as possible from the responsibilities that you would have in this particular job, and make sure the answer illustrates either good performance or an ability to learn. 

6. Give me an example of when you handled a major crisis

Many candidates are thrown by just how dramatic this question sounds, so feel free to reframe it as "Give an example of when you coped with a difficult situation". Look back through your personal, professional and educational life and think of situations where you successfully dealt with an unexpected problem.

7. Give me an example of a time when you showed initiative

A big danger here is of stumbling into describing an idea that you had that you didn't put into action. It is therefore better to describe an idea that you did act upon, where you solved a problem by yourself and can back it up with examples of the positive consequences that such action had.

8. Where do you expect to be in five years' time?

Saying that you want to be running the company or in the interviewer's role isn't a very insightful answer. Talk instead about your motivations and your understanding of your likely career path in this particular organisation or industry - this being very much a question where you will be expected to have done your employer research.

9. What can you tell me about this company/industry?

It's obvious advice to say that this requires extensive prior research, but again, it's true. Look at the company website, its 'About Us' section and any other details about the company's history, objectives and values that you can find. Write down some key points to tell the interviewer that show you are interested in a job with this company, not just a job.

10. Do you have any questions or anything else you would like to add?

This shouldn't be your cue to just say "no". Take the opportunity to end the interview on a decisive and memorable note that banishes any lingering interviewer doubts. Prepare some questions in advance about the company's culture or even what the interviewer likes best about the company, to demonstrate that you are interviewing them, rather than merely being interviewed by them.  

Don't be yet another candidate who thinks they're good enough to "wing it" - by thoroughly preparing in advance with answers for questions like the above, you will be able to gain a decisive advantage in the race for many of the most desirable jobs. 

One of the biggest changes in the world of science recruitment in recent years - indeed, in any recruitment field - has been the rise of the virtual interview.

Virtual interviews can be defined as "any form of interview that uses information and communication technologies (ICTs) such as email, discussion board, real-time chat or video chat system such as Skype."

While many of the usual principles of how to handle a job interview also apply for a virtual interview, the latter also comes with certain distinctive challenges - so don't forget the below advice when faced with one.

Get comfortable with the technology

Particularly when you are being interviewed for more technical science jobs, it is important to get the associated technology in order and not appear overawed or intimidated by it - any attempted small-talk about how weird it is to be interviewed 'virtually' is likely to create the wrong impression.

If technical issues do occur - as can happen with even the best preparation - respond in a professional way, asking the interviewer to repeat the question if necessary and politely asking if you can disconnect and reconnect if the problem is persistent.

Also keep signalling acknowledgement - such as by saying "yes" or "hmm" or nodding the head - so that the interviewer is in no doubt that you can hear them.

Project the most professional impression

There are so many issues of professional presentation or lack thereof that can arise in a virtual interview if you do not thoroughly and suitably prepare.

Dress remains as important in a virtual interview as it does in a face-to-face one. Indeed, with one recent study suggesting that simply wearing a suit affects the way you think, it is advisable to dress smartly even for a phone interview.

Other presentation issues that can arise during a virtual interview include your cat walking into the shot, unmade bedding in the background, harsh lighting or an unflattering camera angle - again, all problems that need to be ironed out in the preparation rather than during the interview itself.

Be sure to adopt the right interview manner

In all of your anxiety to project the desired impression of a competent candidate, it can be easy to forget such apparent basics as actually looking into the camera rather than your image on the screen, keeping a straight posture and being subtle in reference to any notes that you have placed nearby to aid you.

Remember, too, not to over-rehearse - in a virtual interview as much as in a 'real' one, a natural manner can go a long way to making you a more engaging interviewee.

There are so many other important things to keep in mind when being interviewed 'virtually', from choosing a professional username if this is required for any videoconferencing technology you use, to keeping a printout of your CV and other key documentation nearby.

If there's one thing that definitely applies to virtual interviews as much as it does to 'normal' in-person interviews, it is the great importance of preparation - so never underestimate it if you are called to such an interview by a recruitment agency. 

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