Biotechnology careers

Biotechnology is an ever-changing, interdisciplinary industry that aims to create solutions for a range of scientific sectors (including genetics, medicine and immunology).

Biotechnology combines processes from both biology and technology fields to create products and technologies that help to improve people's lives and the health of the planet. It should therefore come as no surprise that many science graduates opt to pursue a career in biotechnology.

With the industry being as vast as it is, there are many different biotechnology career options available. Here, we take a look at some of the most in-demand biotechnology careers and the requirements that come with them!

 

Biochemist

A biochemist studies the chemical properties of biological processes and living things, such as disease, cell growth and development. They perform complex research projects and frequently isolate, analyse and synthesise DNA, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and other types of molecules. They also research the effects of hormones, drugs and nutrients on tissues and biological processes in order to develop products and processes that may improve human health.

Education Requirements: Doctorate in biochemistry

Salary:

  • Graduate - £18,000 to £28,000
  • PhD - £28,000 to £32,000
  • Senior - £35,000 to £40,000
  • Leadership - £45,000 to £50,000
  • Management - £50,000 to £55,000+

Career Prospects: As your career progresses, you're likely to move into more senior roles that involve leading a team / project and making key decisions. With further experience, you may start to oversee the work of a wider multi-disciplinary team and become more involved in strategic decisions and the planning of research.

 

Microbiologist

A microbiologist studies viruses, bacteria and the immune system to create biomedical and industrial products. They perform complex research projects and lab experiments that help in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious illnesses.

Education Requirements: Bachelor's degree in microbiology, biochemistry or related field. PhD required to conduct independent research.

Salary: £31,000 to £100,000+ depending on experience and further qualifications.

Career Prospects: There are generally very good opportunities for career progression within microbiology. It's possible to move from practitioner, to specialist, to team manager and then consultant. At senior levels, there will be more responsibility for the work of the lab and staff management.

 

Biomedical Engineer

Biomedical engineers combine biology and engineering expertise to design solutions for issues within the spheres of both biology and medicine. With the aim to enhance the quality and effectiveness of patient healthcare, they develop biomedical devices, equipment and medical software such as prostheses, artificial organs and diagnostic machines.

Education Requirements: Bachelor's degree in biomedical engineering, which comprises a combination of biology and engineering courses.

Salary: £23,000 to £43,000 within public sectors. £21,000 to £45,000 within private sectors.

Career Prospects: UK biomedical engineers can, broadly speaking, choose from three main areas to work in: the industry, the NHS, or research. Research will typically involve undertaking a PhD, followed by a role at a university or academic institute. Working within the industry involves securing a job after your degree and starting to work your way up. Senior posts may offer roles in management, production and marketing. The NHS route involves a clear structure within the early years, and the possibility to progress to more senior roles later in your career.

 

Epidemiologist

The role of an epidemiologist involves learning how diseases are spread via people or animals, with their ultimate goal being to completely stop the spread of disease. Since biotechnology utilises farm animals such as chickens and pigs that can carry diseases which mutate and affect humans, epidemiologists are vitally important to ensuring food chain safety.

Education Requirements: Master's degree in epidemiology or an MPH; requirements include coursework in statistics, life sciences and biology.

Salary: £24,000 to £105,000 depending on experience and responsibility.

Career Prospects: There is a structured career path within both the NHS and Public Health England (PHE). Once qualified, you can progress through the grades by gaining experience and completing further study and research.

 

These are just some of the most in-demand biotechnology careers that you can pursue. Click the link below to view a wider range of biotechnology job listings from Hyper Recruitment Solutions!

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Choosing a new employee to join your company is no easy task. Nowadays, a single job advert can receive in excess of 100 applications. With potentially hundreds of CVs to read and a diverse range of people to choose from, hiring the right candidate takes time, patience and careful consideration.

If you get it right, you could be welcoming an inspiring, motivated and hard-working person into your company - someone who will breathe new life into the working environment.

Get it wrong, however, and not only have you wasted an eye-watering amount of money, you're also back where you started, with the same vacancy to fill again...

So, ensure you hire the right candidate first time by taking note of our hiring mistakes to avoid.

 

Not making the job description clear.

To find the perfect fit for a particular role, you need to explain in your job description exactly what your ideal candidate would be like. Job seekers aren't mind-readers, and they need to know exactly what's required of them so that they can decide whether they're the right fit for a job.

Being as clear as possible in the job description improves your chances of finding a candidate who ticks all the boxes.

 

Advertising in the wrong places.

Certain types of people look for jobs in certain types of places, so understand your demographic before you start advertising. If you need a graduate to fill a particular role, make sure your job is advertised on graduate-friendly websites. Similarly, for specialist roles (e.g. scientific jobs) seek the help of industry-specific recruitment specialists like us!

Putting your job in front of the right candidates is crucial if you want to find the right person for the job.

 

Not conducting phone interviews.

A five-minute phone call with a potential candidate can give you a far better insight into their personality than a CV can. How well can they handle the pressure of a phone call? Are they good at communicating? Are they friendly? These are all things that you can determine via a brief telephone conversation.

Phone interviews can save you and your candidates time and help you on your way to identifying the perfect candidate earlier in the hiring process.

We know that the hiring process can be arduous, but don't worry - HRS can offer you lots of expert advice that will help you choose the right candidate for the job first time.

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Office manager talking

If you've ever worked in an office environment, you'll know that some workplace annoyances are as commonplace as the office coffee machine.

Whether it's the water cooler gossip group or that one guy who always leaves his dirty dishes lying around, certain recurring stereotypes rear their head time after time after time.

One such stereotype that's virtually universal is the legendary language of office lingo – a bizarre verbiage used seemingly only within the confines of the office walls.

 

Our 5 Most Irritating Office Buzzwords

From “blue sky thinking” and “reinventing the wheel” to “raising the bar” and “moving the needle”, office linguistics have become a parody of themselves over time.

With that being said, let’s not waste any more column inches. It’s time to grab the low-hanging fruit and open the kimono with a brief intro to some of the most common (and most annoying) office buzzwords known to man.

 

“Ideas shower”

Example: “That’s great. Maybe we should have an ideas shower to expand on this.”

Translation: Brainstorm.

The term “ideas shower” came to prominence in the mid-to-late 2000s after somebody decided that “brain storming” might be offensive to people with epilepsy.

Despite the eggshell treading, a 2005 survey - carried out by the Epilepsy Society - found that “93 per cent of people with epilepsy did not find the term derogatory or offensive in any way”, rendering that caution rather pointless.

Nevertheless, the term is still used in offices to this day, with execs the world over lathering up in its inspiring waters daily.

 

“Learnings”

Example: “What are the key learnings here, Chad?”

Translation: Lessons.

Where to begin?

Okay, we should probably start by highlighting that “learnings” isn’t actually a legitimate dictionary term. Yet here we are…

We’re guessing that, somewhere along the way, “lessons” became a dirty word (unbeknownst to the rest of the world) and a suitable corporate replacement was required.

The chosen substitute was “learnings” – presumably the result of an ideas shower.

 

“Synergise”

Example: “We need to synergise and think outside the box going forward.”

Translation: Work together.

Using dynamic words can be a great way to engage people in a meeting or presentation; however, this is one business term that has gone the way of Tony Christie’s “Amarillo”.

A hackneyed old trope, “synergise” has become an overused crutch for execs looking to incite unity, boost motivation and inspire.

Ironically, this uninspired office cliché is about as inspiring as a demotion and more likely to inspire a migraine.

 

“Disambiguate”

Example: “We need to disambiguate the figures so I can run the numbers by HO.”

Translation: Clarify.

If there was ever a term laced with the power to send teeth into an instinctive state of grinding, this is it.

An ironically confusing word in its own right, this is one term that should be left alone to marinate in its own ambiguity.

 

“Paradigm shift”

Example: “Okay, people. This company is in need of a paradigm shift.”

Translation: Dramatic change.

A true corporate classic, this term is often used to highlight a significant change within a company, industry, or business strategy.

Instead, it often leaves innocent bystanders shell-shocked into a state of dumbfounded numbness.

In the event of such puzzlement, kindly request that your host disambiguate their statement.

 

Honourable Mentions

There are plenty of other infuriating office buzzwords where those came from, such as…

 

“Take this conversation off-line”

Example: “I agree, but perhaps we should take this conversation off-line.”

Translation: Chat in private.

 

“Get our ducks in a row”

Example: “We really need to get all our decks in a row if we want to hit these targets.”

Translation: Get organised.

 

“Cascading relevant information”

Example: “If we could start cascading relevant information, that would be great.”

Translation: Discuss with colleagues.

 

“Guesstimate”

Example: “If I had to guesstimate, Miles, my bonus this year is well into six figures.”

Translation: Guess. Or estimate.

 

“Bandwidth”

Example: “I don't care what marketing says, we don't have the bandwidth for another big project right now.”

Translation: Resources.

 

“Close of play”

Example: “I want that Johnson file on my desk by close of play, Susan.”

Translation: The end of the day.

 

“Upskill”

Example: “We need to upskill the team to increase our bottom line.”

Translation: Train.

 

“Restructuring”

Example: “Head Office have ordered this restructuring, Steve - my hands are tied!”

Translation: Clear out your desk.

 

Buzzword Bingo

If you work in an office, there’s a good chance you’ve already heard some of the above terms this week. You may even be guilty of regurgitating one or two yourself!

As a rule of thumb, the more corporate the environment, the more examples you can expect to find, worn like a verbal badge of honour, proudly polished off in every meeting and presentation. As such, deciphering office buzzwords has become an accepted part of working life for many.

So much so, in fact, that “Buzzword Bingo” has been a popular game for decades, providing office workers the world over with a humorous way to pass the time, avoid boredom and subdue their grating fury over hollow words and surplus syllables.

Why not play a round of Buzzword Bingo during your next ideas shower? Just be sure to synergise with colleagues, get your ducks in a row, and cascade the relevant information ahead of time.

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"We're going to turn the UK into a supercharged magnet, drawing scientists like iron filings from around the world" - Boris Johnson.

While giving a speech at the Culham Science Centre, Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, spoke about his plans to expand the UK's hub of scientists and intellectuals following Brexit.

To do this, he plans to remove the cap on 'tier one' visas which currently only allow 2,000 skilled migrants into the UK each year.

On top of this, he wants officials to come up with a way to allocate automatic endorsement (subject to immigration checks) that allows researchers' families to work and live in the UK too. 

 

The Current Situation

Currently, over half of UK scientific workforce is made up of EU researchers (roughly 211,00 people), who don't need visas to work in Britain. Researchers from outside of the EU are faced with an arduous, expensive process to gain a working visa for the UK costing, on average, £8000.

Following our departure from the EU, researchers from European countries will be expected to go through the same process, which has sparked fears of a scientific skills shortage.

 

Concerns

Researchers in the UK are already worrying about the consequences of a no-deal Brexit. The loss of scientific collaborations with EU institutes, alongside the loss of European funding, is predicted to impact our science industries.

It's thought that the UK will be unable to participate in EU-funded Horizon projects and that British scientists may not be involved at all if the UK leaves the EU without a deal. 

Mr Johnson addressed these concerns by saying "the UK will continue to collaborate in great scientific projects under any circumstances".

 

What Does the Future Hold?

It's nice to see the PM already addressing these concerns and prominent scientific figures, like Dr Daniel Rathbone (assistant director of the Campaign for Science and Engineering), have welcomed the Prime Ministers "powerful message".

But, like us, they look forward to seeing the finer details of these proposals. Science is a collaborative enterprise and we're hopeful that these proposals will keep our science industries thriving for years to come!

Read more on this story here >

If you're currently looking for jobs in the science or technology sector, we can help match you with your dream role! Start by browsing our current job vacancies now. 

Don't forget to follow us on social media for more science news and insights.

Business relocation

Whether your business is in its infancy or a well-established enterprise, you may be considering business relocation as an opportunity to grow and expand (or indeed to downsize).

Business relocation can occur for a plethora of reasons, but one thing is certain: pursuing a fresh start in new premises is not a decision to be taken lightly.

Relocating a whole company is costly and causes disruptions, so choosing the right time to move your business - and doing it for the right reasons - is paramount.

 

Why relocate your business?

 

Moving to find better employees

One reason you might choose to relocate your business is to pursue staff with better qualifications and/or more experience.

If your business requires individuals with a very particular skill set (especially common in scientific professions), you might find that your current location just isn't suitable.

Many business owners relocate close to higher education institutions because they offer a surplus of well-educated graduates who are ready to seek employment.

 

Upgrading facilities

Another reason you might move your business is to make better facilities available to staff. If your workforce is growing and expanding, sheer lack of space can be a factor that influences your decision to relocate.

If you find that you can afford to upgrade your facilities (e.g. desks, toilets, parking) but have insufficient space for it in your current building, relocation may be a great option.

 

Downsizing

If your business is facing economic difficulties, or the location of your business is no longer lucrative, downsizing to smaller offices in a more economically-stable town or city might be just the fresh start your business needs to recover.

Whether you need to cut jobs or not, downsizing your business can increase your profit margins and allow you to move somewhere where demand for your product / service is at its highest.

 

Business Relocation Tips:

  • Plan ahead
  • Let loyal customers and vendors know well in advance
  • Update your contact details
  • Update your website and other online listings
  • Don't make a snap decision

If you're planning to relocate and you need to find new employees for your business, Hyper Recruitment Solutions can help!

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