Microbiology

Microbiology is a burgeoning field, and microbiologists can earn upwards of £30,000 a year (depending on the nature of the role and the candidate's qualifications / experience level).

But what exactly does a microbiologist do? In order to answer that, let's start with a more basic question...

What is Microbiology?

Moicrobiology is the study of microscopic organisms (microorganisms) such as bacteria and viruses. There are many different branches of microbiology, including:

  • Bacteriology (the study of bacteria)
  • Virology (the study of viruses)
  • Mycology (the study of fungi)
  • Phycology (the study of algae)
Generally speaking, the term 'microbiology' can be applied to the study of any living organism that is too small to been with the naked eye.

So that's a rough overview of what microbiology is - now, let's return to our original question. What does a microbiologist do on an average working day?

Microbiologist Job Description

Microbiologists typically work within the medical and life science industries, but can be found in a variety of other sectors too. A degree in Microbiology or a closely-related discipline (e.g. Biomedical Science) tends to be the minimum requirement to enter this line of work, although this may not be mandatory for some junior positions.

As a microbiologist, you'll be spending most of your time in a laboratory, studying microorganisms with the aid of a microscope. If you find yourself working within the healthcare sector, you will most likely be working to understand and prevent different types of infection; elsewhere, you might be required to develop enzyme indicators or analyse biological samples.

Hyper Recruitment Solutions is a leading light in UK science recruitment. Use the link below to browse our latest microbiology vacancies, or create your candidate account here.

Apply for Microbiology Jobs >

Lord Sugar's business partner becomes first winner of The Apprentice to reach £1m profit

Ricky Martin with his business partner Lord Sugar

  • Former winner of The Apprentice and CEO of Hyper Recruitment Solutions (HRS) Ricky Martin leads company to a pre-tax profit of over £1m

  • HRS set to turn over £10m in the 2018 calendar year

  • Projected turnover for the next HRS financial year (July 2018 - June 2019) is £14m

Crowned winner of The Apprentice in 2012, and following the investment from Lord Sugar, Hyper Recruitment Solutions (HRS) was founded focusing on mid-level and senior recruitment in STEM industries globally; and today announces huge success, reaching the £1m profit mark.

HRS turned over a staggering £8m in the 12 months up to June 2018, achieving a 106% growth on profit and a 90% growth on turnover. Following on from the previous year’s 34% growth on profit and 59% on turnover. In the past 12 months alone, HRS has broken all company records on both sales and profit whilst managing to restructure and expand.

With two new locations in Manchester and Edinburgh alongside the founding company site based in Essex, the successful business now boasts 50 employees across the business. The company’s rapid expansion has resulted in a newly formed internal training academy together with focus on recruitment development, showcasing employee retention and return on investment in the first 12 months, snowballing from 30% to 80%. The expansion of staff by 50% has proved to be HRS’s most expensive, yet most successful year to date.

With continued success in mind, HRS have big plans for the next two years, looking to continue growth as the leading recruitment partner for science industries across the UK as well as a plan to focus on developing the businesses presence and offering across Europe.

Ricky Martin, CEO of Hyper Recruitment Solutions, says: “I couldn’t be prouder of the whole team at HRS who have got us to where we are today. To have grown from a company of just one back in 2012 to a business with 50 staff across 3 major UK cities, that makes a difference to so many people, is remarkable.”

Lord Sugar commented: “Investing in Ricky was a no-brainer, his understanding of the recruitment industry combined with his passion for business has resulted in the success Hyper Recruitment Solutions sees today. Being the first Apprentice winner to hit the £1m pre-tax profit mark is just the start, I know the future is bright for HRS going forward.”

HRS further plan to reinvest the business profit into talent at the business, growing their specialist workforce and continuing to provide the training and development needed to maintain their standards of employing the most professional and ethical recruiters in the industry.

Mr Martin added: “Money has always been secondary to changing lives in my eyes, however to do so and become the first winner of The Apprentice to break the £1m profit milestone in a single company year, is a huge success and I couldn’t be more thrilled!”

Making strides in the recruitment world, HRS ensures they give back to communities proving they’re not solely in it for profit. The business currently partners with charities Jeans for Genes, Alzheimer’s Society and Apps 4 Good which all make a difference to the sectors they recruit for, namely science, technology and engineering.

Mr Martin continued: “The reason Lord Sugar invested in to my business idea is because I was not just a recruiter. I was somebody who wanted to support talent in a specialist sector, which makes a real difference. It’s this passion for doing the right thing that has seen HRS go from strength to strength; and is why our financials have followed suit!”

Visit Hyper Recruitment Solutions >

Scientist Quiz

Nearly 7,000 people (and counting!) have taken Hyper Recruitment Solutions' What Type of Scientist Are You? quiz since we launched it earlier this year.

And who knows? Maybe we inspired some of those individuals to consider a career that had never even occurred to them before! For instance, have you ever thought about how your innate problem-solving skills might serve you well as a data scientist? Or how your love of animals might translate into a rewarding career in zoology?

If not, be sure to take the quiz yourself before you read on to find out what results everyone else has been getting!

The Most Popular Results

Science Quiz Results - Graph

As you can see, there's been a lot of variety in the results that people have been getting from our quiz - some people are clinical scientists, some are ecologists, and some are better suited to biochemistry.

The 3 most popular results are:

  1. Geologist (14.4% of people get this result)
  2. Astronomer (13.9% of people get this result)
  3. Physicist (13.4% of people get this result)

This suggests that there are a lot of people out there with analytical minds and a great love for going outdoors - these are qualities that mesh very well with a career in geology!

We've also seen a lot of people show an interest in unlocking the really big mysteries, like whether we're alone in the universe and indeed where the universe came from in the first place. These people would make great astronomers and physicians - the second and third most popular quiz results respectively.

The least popular result was Biologist - just 4.6% of our quiz-takers are best suited to a career in biology, but that's still more than 300 people!

Take the Quiz >   Browse Science Jobs >

What Can Job Interviewers Ask?

The questions you're asked during a job interview should mostly focus on your experience and qualifications. It also gives you and your prospective employer a chance to get to know one another.

What a job interview shouldn't be is an opportunity for the interviewer to ask lots of probing personal questions. In most cases, it's illegal for employers to make hiring decisions based on protected characteristics such as age, race, sexuality, and so on. By extension, it's usually not appropriate to ask about these things in an interview setting.

Sadly, just because it's not allowed doesn't mean that people don't do it. Hyper Recruitment Solutions conducted a survey of 1,000 hiring managers and 1,000 jobseekers, and a stunning 85% of interviewers admitted to asking inappropriate questions in job interviews.

Here's a closer look at some of the subjects that should remain off-limits for interviewers...


Age

Example: What year were you born?

Interviewers are not allowed to ask you your age or date of birth. You also don't have to include this information on your CV if you don't wish to.

55% of the interviewers we surveyed admitted to asking candidates when they were born. 60% stated that they considered this an 'acceptable' question.


Children & Pregnancy

Example: Have you got any plans to start a family?

It's illegal to make hiring decisions based on whether or not the candidate has children and/or plans to have a child in the future. Paid maternity/paternity leave is a right, and employers can't exclude candidates who wish to become parents just because they don't want to grant it. Already being a parent should not be a barrier to getting a job either.

That being said, our survey found that 40% of employers think it's acceptable to ask if a candidate is planning on taking maternity/paternity leave, while 54% find it acceptable to ask whether the candidate has any children already.


Gender & Sexuality

Example: Are you a man or a woman?

Your sexual orientation and gender identity are personal matters that should not have any bearing on your ability to do your job.

In most cases, it is illegal for employers to ask about your sex or your sexuality (although exceptions may be made for positive action schemes, e.g. an initiative to hire more LGBT workers).


Health & Disabilities

Example: Are you physically fit and healthy?

In our survey, 53% of hiring managers admitted to asking the question above. But it's illegal to ask questions about a candidate's health before offering them a job.

Employers in certain industries may require workers to pass a physical exam before starting work. Crucially, though, this should not be part of the recruitment/hiring process - any necessary health checks can only take place once the candidate has been offered the job.


Marital Status & Relationships

Example: Are you in a relationship?

As with gender and sexuality, one's marital status generally has no bearing at all on their suitability for a job. And yet 51% of interviewers we surveyed admitted to asking candidates whether they're married / in a relationship!


Religion

Example: Will you need time off for religious holidays?

It's unlawful to discriminate against someone based on their religious beliefs, so questions about faith should be off-limits at all times during job interviews.

Unfortunately, our survey indicated that just 18% of hiring managers understand that it's illegal to ask questions like 'Will you need time off for religious holidays?' 39% said it was inappropriate, but not illegal, while 43% felt that this question was acceptable.


Where You're From

Example: Where were you born?

Questions like 'Where were you born?' and 'Where's that accent from?' may seem innocuous enough, but again, they're not appropriate for an interview environment. Sadly, a large number of interviewers think these questions are acceptable - for instance, 47% of those surveyed stated that it's acceptable to ask the origin of a candidate's accent.


More useful links from HRS:

Research Scientist

A research scientist is someone who plans and conducts experiments in almost any area of science, from pharmacology to meteorology. In this blog post, we will look at some of the main responsibilities of research scientists and the types of organisation they work for.

What does a working day in the life of a research scientist look like?

As a research scientist, you will spend most of your working life in a laboratory. Depending on your role and the industry you're in, you could be doing all kinds of different things, including:

  • Designing and carrying out experiments
  • Collecting samples
  • Recording, analysing and presenting data
  • Drafting research reports that discuss the methods and findings of your research
  • Supervising or training junior members of staff / technicians
  • Researching and staying up to date with scientific developments in your field

While this list is not exhaustive, it does give you a flavour of just how varied a research scientist's job can be. Having said that, research scientists generally spend several years on a single project - but while this may sound tedious, the quest for an answer can actually be very rewarding.

Who employs research scientists?

Research scientists are needed across virtually all scientific disciplines, and accordingly, it's possible to find work in all kinds of different sectors. Examples include:

  • Universities
  • Pharmaceutical companies
  • Environmental agencies
  • Food and drink manufacturers
  • Government bodies

Are you looking for a job as a research scientist? Use the link below to browse the latest vacancies from Hyper Recruitment Solutions!

Apply for Research & Development Jobs >

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