Hyper Recruitment Solutions has been included in the FT 1000 list!

HRS team

We recently learned that Hyper Recruitment Solutions (HRS) was to be included in this year's FT 1000 list, an annual ranking of the fastest-growing companies in Europe. We are the 42nd fastest-growing UK company in the list, and the highest-ranking company founded by a former BBC Apprentice winner. This is a tremendous honour for us, and testament to the company's ongoing success!


What is the FT 1000?

The FT 1000 is an annually-published list of the thousand fastest-growing companies in Europe. The rankings - compiled by the Financial Times in association with Statista - are based on compound annual growth rate in revenues.

Click here to view this year's FT 1000 list in full.


What does this mean for us?

Ranking among Europe's fastest-growing businesses is, as mentioned above, a great honour for all of us here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, and we'd like to thank all of the candidates and employers who work with us - as well as our hard-working staff in Essex, Manchester and Edinburgh - for making this achievement possible.

There can be no doubt that HRS has become a leading light in the science and technology recruitment industry, and we have established a fantastic reputation for ethical, high-quality service. Our inclusion in the FT 1000 list is just the latest in a number of high-profile awards and honours for Hyper Recruitment Solutions - for example, did you know that we were recently named Best Company to Work for (Up to 50 Employees) at the 10th annual IRP Awards?

More About HRS   Browse Science Jobs

Would you like to join our award-winning team? Visit our Careers page!

Have you been meaning to get your little ones more involved and interested in science? Great – British Science Week is the perfect time to do so! 


British Science Week

British Science Week is a ten-day celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths. This incredible week is run by the British Science Association, who are encouraging people of all ages to participate in STEM events and activities.

They are hosting a number of events across the country if you’d like to take your child to one, but you can also get involved with British Science Week at home with the help of their free activity packs. You can view and download the activity packs here:

British Science Week Activity Packs >

If you have your own idea for a STEM event or activity, you can use the British Science Association’s networking platform Science Live to get other people in your area involved. The aim of this week is to get as many people involved in science as possible, so don’t be shy to engage with your community!

We think that this is a great way to get people of all ages involved in science. Hopefully, this celebration will spark an interest that leads to them pursuing careers in science industries too! Will you be doing anything to celebrate British Science Week this year? Why not take our quiz to find out what type of scientist you are?

Take Our Science Quiz >

On the 8th March every year we celebrate International Women’s Day, a day that promotes gender equality & celebrates the achievements of women worldwide. 

Female Scientist

As specialists in science recruitment, we wanted to celebrate women working in science, technology, engineering and mathematics industries this International Women’s Day. It is widely acknowledged that pretty much all STEM careers are saturated with male workers, but in recent years more women have been studying STEM subjects and pursuing STEM careers. Let’s take a look at some of the interesting statistics provided by The STEM Women Organisation:


Number of Women Graduating in STEM Subjects

These figures show that in 2016/17 more women graduated with STEM degrees than they did in the previous year across all core subjects! It truly is amazing to see an increase in the number of women taking an interest in science.

Women & Science in the Media:

One way that women are often inspired to pursue a particular degree or a career is through aspiring to be like other women they see on TV. There are a number of women in the media who, through their work as scientific TV presenters, are really inspiring other women to pursue science careers.

Liz Bonnin

For those of you who haven’t heard of Liz Bonnin, she is a TV presenter who has worked on a number of successful science and nature programmes. She studied biochemistry at university and later completed a masters in Wild Animal biology. In her TV career, Liz has presented over 50 primetime science and nature programmes including the incredibly popular BBC 1 documentary Drowning in Plastic. Liz has travelled the length and breadth of the Earth to pursue her career, and is a true inspiration to women.

Professor Alice Roberts

As an anatomist, biological anthropologist, author, broadcaster and Professor of Public Engagement in Science and the University of Birmingham, it’s safe to say that Professor Alice Roberts is an amazing role model for women who are interested in science. She has presented a range of science and archaeology TV shows and regularly tours the country to give lectures on her books and television programmes.

Miranda Krestovnikoff

Miranda is not only a biologist, but she is a specialist in natural history and archaeology and she’s a trained diver! This amazingly talented woman has presented a range of television programmes that showcase her extensive knowledge of these subjects, and she has authored two books. She enjoys motivating young people to love and care for nature in the way that she does, and she often visits schools and universities to share her message.

Aren’t these women truly inspirational! We think it’s great that women can use the media to not only promote science and conservation but also to show younger women that science is an increasingly gender inclusive industry. If you’re a woman on the hunt for a science-based job, take a look at the science jobs we have to offer by clicking the button below:

View Science Jobs on HRS >


Job Interview Biggest Weakness

If you’re going for a job interview, you’re probably dreading the interviewer asking you to talk about your biggest weakness – and that’s totally normal. This very common interview question puts you on the spot and requires you to evaluate and talk about yourself in a somewhat negative way.

To minimise the risk of freezing up or saying the wrong thing, there are a few things you can do to prepare yourself for this question:

Understand WHY interviewers ask this question.

It might seem a little strange for an interviewer, who should be interested in your achievements and experience, to want to know about your biggest weakness. But the reason they ask this question is quite simple: they want to get past your smart, rehearsed interview façade to understand what you’re like as a person and what you’re like to work with.

Answer the question in TWO parts:

1. Identify your weakness.

  • Don't deny that you have weaknesses.
  • Choose a weakness that doesn't directly relate to the job.
  • Try not to get defensive or talk about yourself in an overly negative way.
  • Don't try to disguise a strength as a weakness - try to be honest.

2. Talk about how you're working on it.

  • Give an example of a time your weakness caused an issue at work, then explain how you resolved it.
  • Give examples of the ways you plan to work on your weakness (if you haven't started working on it already).
  • Be positive and confident - having weaknesses isn't something to be embarrassed about. Everybody has them!

Plan your response to the question.

It is quite likely that the interviewer will ask you about your biggest weakness - this question is so common at this point that it's on the verge of becoming a cliché - so we recommend preparing a constructive answer ahead of time.

  • Think carefully about your weaknesses and write them down.

  • Look at the job specification and highlight the key skills and attributes required for the role.

  • Compare your list of weaknesses to the key requirements of the job. Exclude any weaknesses that might give the impression you're not suitable for the position at all - e.g. don't give shyness as your answer if it's a customer-facing role requiring strong interpersonal skills.

  • Compose a strong answer relating to the remaining weakness(es).

Example of a good response:

Scenario: You're applying for a job as a lab technician. This job requires meticulous attention to detail and safe practices.

Good Answer: "I am not very good at public speaking. I get very nervous; I'll happily put my ideas forward when working in a small team, but on a larger scale, I do tend to struggle. However, I have arranged to go back to my university and give a talk to current chemistry students about my experience on the course - I'm hoping that this will help me to improve!"

Bad Answer: "I really struggle to be organised. My friends and family say I'm a bit of a slob, and I'm always breaking things accidentally. There's not much I can do about it, though - that's just who I am!"

Here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we can offer lots of helpful advice if you're applying for a job in a scientific sector. Click the link below to browse our latest job listings.

Browse Science Jobs >

Women in Science

The International Day of Women and Girls in Science, which takes place on the 11th of February every year, was created by the United Nations as part of the ongoing effort to address gender imbalance in core STEM subjects and promote the participation of women in scientific roles.

The Statistics

Across 14 different countries, the percentage of women graduating from universities with degrees in science-related subjects are as follows:

  • Bachelor's Degree: 18%
  • Master's Degree: 8%
  • PhD: 2%

These low figures are quite disheartening, as are reports that under 30% of scientific research and development roles are currently held by women.

The UN's International Day of Women and Girls in Science aims to encourage women and young girls to pursue an education or career in science and dramatically raise the above percentages.

Breaking Gender Stereotypes

To mark the occasion, we'd like to take a look at just some of the many prolific female scientists who have done vital work throughout history and helped to pave the way for gender equality in scientific fields:

Lise Meitner (1878-1968)

Lise Meitner was an Austrian-Swedish physicist who specialised in radioactivity and nuclear physics. Together with a select group of other scientists, she discovered nuclear fission of uranium - the basic principle of the nuclear weapons that were to follow.

Grace Hopper (1906-1992)

Grace Hopper was an American computer scientist. She was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark 1 computer, and she developed an early variation of the programming language COBOL which is still in use today.

Sandra Faber (1944- )

Sandra Faber is an astrophysicist specialising in the evolution of galaxies. Some of her important contributions to science include linking the brightness of galaxies to the speed of stars within them and helping to design the Keck telescopes in Hawaii.

Are you ready to pursue a career in science? HRS is here to help! Click the link below to browse a huge selection of science jobs spanning a variety of scientific fields.

See All Science Jobs >