Online job search

Let's face it: looking for a job can be very challenging. And staying motivated during a frustrating job search can seem impossible.

It's natural to feel down in dumps when you're struggling to find a new job, but prolonged exasperation can pull you into a downward spiral from which it may be hard to bounce back.

So how can you get past those feelings? Here are a few job search motivation tips to help perk you!

 

Have a plan.

Before you begin your job search, you should have a clear idea of what sort of role / company you're actually looking for. What are your red lines? Are you casting your net as wide as possible, or staying within a very specific niche? Asking yourself these questions will help to keep you relaxed when things get a little crazy and disjointed.

Bringing some structure to your job search allows you to control the controllable and helps you to stay focused.

 

Be around people that inspire you.

It's never a good feeling when a job application is met with rejection. If this happens multiple times, your confidence may start to dwindle.

When you're feeling low, it may help to surround yourself with positivity. One way to do this is to make an effort to meet up with positive influences in your life. These can be family members, friends, or industry colleagues who'll help you to stay on track and not get too disheartened when things aren't going your way.

 

Remind yourself of your achievements.

When faced with rejection, we often start to feel as if we're not good enough and question our own value. An excellent way to overcome this feeling is to remind yourself of all the great things that you have accomplished in your work life. These can be small things, such as positive comments from former clients or praise-filled emails from an ex-boss, or they can be more formal milestones like certificates and awards you've received.

Create a collection of all these positive reminders to keep yourself motivated.

 

Help others.

Helping others is another fantastic way to raise your motivation levels during a job search. This may sound a little cheesy, but it's easier to feel happy when you're providing happiness to others - whether that's in a volunteering space, mentoring somebody, or just helping out some friend who can't help themselves.

 

Don't be too hard on yourself.

This is probably the most important tip to remember when you're going through a tough job hunt. Be kind to yourself. Remind yourself that there are tonnes of talented people in the world who are in the exact same position as you who are, also struggling - you are not on your own.

Your lack of success isn't your fault, and you need to just keep on trying.

 

Take in some motivational material.

Stay motivated by reading and listening to motivational material! Subscribe to motivational blogs and podcasts to keep your positive energy levels high, and keep up-to-date with essential industry news so that you are staying on top of your game and are constantly learning. This will give you the little bursts of drive that you need to keep your job search going!

 

READ MORE: Why Didn't I Get the Job?

CV Advice & Tips   Browse Science Jobs

Morning commute in London

Despite an increasing number of people working from home, many of us still have to commute back and forth to the office every day. Coupled with the fact that the length of the average commute has now risen from 48 minutes to an hour, you may find that you're actually spending quite a lot of your time on the train, bus, taxi or sitting in your car.

But this time doesn't have to be wasted. Regardless of how you prefer to commute, here are a number of ways that you can make more of your morning and evening travel time!

 

Listen to audiobooks and podcasts

Enjoying an audiobook or podcast series while commuting is a great way to pass the time. Listening to audiobooks prepares you to think critically, allowing you to be on top of your work from the get-go. You could even listen to something that's relevant to your job - this can help to spark ideas and generally psych you up for the day.

Alternatively, if you'd prefer to steer clear of work-related content, audiobooks and podcasts can allow you to get lost in a story or conversation that takes your mind off your day-to-day stress.

 

Enjoy some music

A number of studies have pointed out the positive effects that music can have, such as improved immunity, reduced stress, enhanced brain function and relief from anxiety. Music is even better when you're joining in - although you should maybe avoid doing this on a packed train at 8 in the morning.

 

Take a nap

Naps are great. Everyone loves a nap, right? If work or your home life has left you a little sleep-deprived, your commute may just be the perfect place to close the deficit.

Simply sit back, relax and grab the shut-eye you need. Just make sure you don't miss your stop or dribble on the person next to you.

 

Read something

Whether it's a paperback, an ebook, a newspaper or a magazine, your morning commute presents the perfect time to put your head down and get lost in words. As with the audiobook tip above, you can dive head-first into something work-related or something completely fictional - the choice is yours.

Reading comes with a host of benefits too, such as reduced anxiety and enhancing your ability to understand others.

 

Catch up on the small stuff

Depending on the length of your commute and your transportation method, you may be able to use the time to catch up on all the small stuff you tend to put off.

Clear your mental in-tray by replying to texts and emails, creating shopping lists, or even setting small goals for the week ahead.

 

Get inspired

Regardless of how you commute, there are always opportunities to be inspired! Instead of gazing aimlessly out of the window, try taking a few minutes to take in the people and places around you. There is always value in simply noticing what is going on in your surroundings.

So, next time you feel your mind wandering, try focusing your senses to see if there is anything that sparks your interest!

 

In summary, there is no right or wrong way to make the most out of your commute to and from work. One day, you may listen to an audiobook; the next, you could be replying to emails or making up a story in your head about a fellow passenger and his unusual hat.

Whatever you decide to do, be sure to use your commute wisely so that you can start or finish your day feeling energised or relaxed and make your workweek just that little bit easier.

 

Like HRS on Facebook for more advice and insight like this!

 

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Biotechnology careers

Biotechnology is an ever-changing, interdisciplinary industry that aims to create solutions for a range of scientific sectors (including genetics, medicine and immunology).

Biotechnology combines processes from both biology and technology fields to create products and technologies that help to improve people's lives and the health of the planet. It should therefore come as no surprise that many science graduates opt to pursue a career in biotechnology.

With the industry being as vast as it is, there are many different biotechnology career options available. Here, we take a look at some of the most in-demand biotechnology careers and the requirements that come with them!

 

Biochemist

A biochemist studies the chemical properties of biological processes and living things, such as disease, cell growth and development. They perform complex research projects and frequently isolate, analyse and synthesise DNA, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and other types of molecules. They also research the effects of hormones, drugs and nutrients on tissues and biological processes in order to develop products and processes that may improve human health.

Education Requirements: Doctorate in biochemistry

Salary:

  • Graduate - £18,000 to £28,000
  • PhD - £28,000 to £32,000
  • Senior - £35,000 to £40,000
  • Leadership - £45,000 to £50,000
  • Management - £50,000 to £55,000+

Career Prospects: As your career progresses, you're likely to move into more senior roles that involve leading a team / project and making key decisions. With further experience, you may start to oversee the work of a wider multi-disciplinary team and become more involved in strategic decisions and the planning of research.

 

Microbiologist

A microbiologist studies viruses, bacteria and the immune system to create biomedical and industrial products. They perform complex research projects and lab experiments that help in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious illnesses.

Education Requirements: Bachelor's degree in microbiology, biochemistry or related field. PhD required to conduct independent research.

Salary: £31,000 to £100,000+ depending on experience and further qualifications.

Career Prospects: There are generally very good opportunities for career progression within microbiology. It's possible to move from practitioner, to specialist, to team manager and then consultant. At senior levels, there will be more responsibility for the work of the lab and staff management.

 

Biomedical Engineer

Biomedical engineers combine biology and engineering expertise to design solutions for issues within the spheres of both biology and medicine. With the aim to enhance the quality and effectiveness of patient healthcare, they develop biomedical devices, equipment and medical software such as prostheses, artificial organs and diagnostic machines.

Education Requirements: Bachelor's degree in biomedical engineering, which comprises a combination of biology and engineering courses.

Salary: £23,000 to £43,000 within public sectors. £21,000 to £45,000 within private sectors.

Career Prospects: UK biomedical engineers can, broadly speaking, choose from three main areas to work in: the industry, the NHS, or research. Research will typically involve undertaking a PhD, followed by a role at a university or academic institute. Working within the industry involves securing a job after your degree and starting to work your way up. Senior posts may offer roles in management, production and marketing. The NHS route involves a clear structure within the early years, and the possibility to progress to more senior roles later in your career.

 

Epidemiologist

The role of an epidemiologist involves learning how diseases are spread via people or animals, with their ultimate goal being to completely stop the spread of disease. Since biotechnology utilises farm animals such as chickens and pigs that can carry diseases which mutate and affect humans, epidemiologists are vitally important to ensuring food chain safety.

Education Requirements: Master's degree in epidemiology or an MPH; requirements include coursework in statistics, life sciences and biology.

Salary: £24,000 to £105,000 depending on experience and responsibility.

Career Prospects: There is a structured career path within both the NHS and Public Health England (PHE). Once qualified, you can progress through the grades by gaining experience and completing further study and research.

 

These are just some of the most in-demand biotechnology careers that you can pursue. Click the link below to view a wider range of biotechnology job listings from Hyper Recruitment Solutions!

Browse Biotechnology Jobs >>

Choosing a new employee to join your company is no easy task. Nowadays, a single job advert can receive in excess of 100 applications. With potentially hundreds of CVs to read and a diverse range of people to choose from, hiring the right candidate takes time, patience and careful consideration.

If you get it right, you could be welcoming an inspiring, motivated and hard-working person into your company - someone who will breathe new life into the working environment.

Get it wrong, however, and not only have you wasted an eye-watering amount of money, you're also back where you started, with the same vacancy to fill again...

So, ensure you hire the right candidate first time by taking note of our hiring mistakes to avoid.

 

Not making the job description clear.

To find the perfect fit for a particular role, you need to explain in your job description exactly what your ideal candidate would be like. Job seekers aren't mind-readers, and they need to know exactly what's required of them so that they can decide whether they're the right fit for a job.

Being as clear as possible in the job description improves your chances of finding a candidate who ticks all the boxes.

 

Advertising in the wrong places.

Certain types of people look for jobs in certain types of places, so understand your demographic before you start advertising. If you need a graduate to fill a particular role, make sure your job is advertised on graduate-friendly websites. Similarly, for specialist roles (e.g. scientific jobs) seek the help of industry-specific recruitment specialists like us!

Putting your job in front of the right candidates is crucial if you want to find the right person for the job.

 

Not conducting phone interviews.

A five-minute phone call with a potential candidate can give you a far better insight into their personality than a CV can. How well can they handle the pressure of a phone call? Are they good at communicating? Are they friendly? These are all things that you can determine via a brief telephone conversation.

Phone interviews can save you and your candidates time and help you on your way to identifying the perfect candidate earlier in the hiring process.

We know that the hiring process can be arduous, but don't worry - HRS can offer you lots of expert advice that will help you choose the right candidate for the job first time.

Our Candidate Screening Process   Submit a Job Listing

Office manager talking

If you've ever worked in an office environment, you'll know that some workplace annoyances are as commonplace as the office coffee machine.

Whether it's the water cooler gossip group or that one guy who always leaves his dirty dishes lying around, certain recurring stereotypes rear their head time after time after time.

One such stereotype that's virtually universal is the legendary language of office lingo – a bizarre verbiage used seemingly only within the confines of the office walls.

 

Our 5 Most Irritating Office Buzzwords

From “blue sky thinking” and “reinventing the wheel” to “raising the bar” and “moving the needle”, office linguistics have become a parody of themselves over time.

With that being said, let’s not waste any more column inches. It’s time to grab the low-hanging fruit and open the kimono with a brief intro to some of the most common (and most annoying) office buzzwords known to man.

 

“Ideas shower”

Example: “That’s great. Maybe we should have an ideas shower to expand on this.”

Translation: Brainstorm.

The term “ideas shower” came to prominence in the mid-to-late 2000s after somebody decided that “brain storming” might be offensive to people with epilepsy.

Despite the eggshell treading, a 2005 survey - carried out by the Epilepsy Society - found that “93 per cent of people with epilepsy did not find the term derogatory or offensive in any way”, rendering that caution rather pointless.

Nevertheless, the term is still used in offices to this day, with execs the world over lathering up in its inspiring waters daily.

 

“Learnings”

Example: “What are the key learnings here, Chad?”

Translation: Lessons.

Where to begin?

Okay, we should probably start by highlighting that “learnings” isn’t actually a legitimate dictionary term. Yet here we are…

We’re guessing that, somewhere along the way, “lessons” became a dirty word (unbeknownst to the rest of the world) and a suitable corporate replacement was required.

The chosen substitute was “learnings” – presumably the result of an ideas shower.

 

“Synergise”

Example: “We need to synergise and think outside the box going forward.”

Translation: Work together.

Using dynamic words can be a great way to engage people in a meeting or presentation; however, this is one business term that has gone the way of Tony Christie’s “Amarillo”.

A hackneyed old trope, “synergise” has become an overused crutch for execs looking to incite unity, boost motivation and inspire.

Ironically, this uninspired office cliché is about as inspiring as a demotion and more likely to inspire a migraine.

 

“Disambiguate”

Example: “We need to disambiguate the figures so I can run the numbers by HO.”

Translation: Clarify.

If there was ever a term laced with the power to send teeth into an instinctive state of grinding, this is it.

An ironically confusing word in its own right, this is one term that should be left alone to marinate in its own ambiguity.

 

“Paradigm shift”

Example: “Okay, people. This company is in need of a paradigm shift.”

Translation: Dramatic change.

A true corporate classic, this term is often used to highlight a significant change within a company, industry, or business strategy.

Instead, it often leaves innocent bystanders shell-shocked into a state of dumbfounded numbness.

In the event of such puzzlement, kindly request that your host disambiguate their statement.

 

Honourable Mentions

There are plenty of other infuriating office buzzwords where those came from, such as…

 

“Take this conversation off-line”

Example: “I agree, but perhaps we should take this conversation off-line.”

Translation: Chat in private.

 

“Get our ducks in a row”

Example: “We really need to get all our decks in a row if we want to hit these targets.”

Translation: Get organised.

 

“Cascading relevant information”

Example: “If we could start cascading relevant information, that would be great.”

Translation: Discuss with colleagues.

 

“Guesstimate”

Example: “If I had to guesstimate, Miles, my bonus this year is well into six figures.”

Translation: Guess. Or estimate.

 

“Bandwidth”

Example: “I don't care what marketing says, we don't have the bandwidth for another big project right now.”

Translation: Resources.

 

“Close of play”

Example: “I want that Johnson file on my desk by close of play, Susan.”

Translation: The end of the day.

 

“Upskill”

Example: “We need to upskill the team to increase our bottom line.”

Translation: Train.

 

“Restructuring”

Example: “Head Office have ordered this restructuring, Steve - my hands are tied!”

Translation: Clear out your desk.

 

Buzzword Bingo

If you work in an office, there’s a good chance you’ve already heard some of the above terms this week. You may even be guilty of regurgitating one or two yourself!

As a rule of thumb, the more corporate the environment, the more examples you can expect to find, worn like a verbal badge of honour, proudly polished off in every meeting and presentation. As such, deciphering office buzzwords has become an accepted part of working life for many.

So much so, in fact, that “Buzzword Bingo” has been a popular game for decades, providing office workers the world over with a humorous way to pass the time, avoid boredom and subdue their grating fury over hollow words and surplus syllables.

Why not play a round of Buzzword Bingo during your next ideas shower? Just be sure to synergise with colleagues, get your ducks in a row, and cascade the relevant information ahead of time.

Follow HRS on Twitter >>   Browse Science Jobs >>