It's not surprising that the pharmaceutical industry is such a key focus for many of those in pursuit of the most desirable science jobs, given the ever-evolving nature of the sector amid continually high demand for new and improved medications and therapeutics.

As a pharmaceutical worker, you may be involved in everything from the dispensing of drugs and the labelling of medication to the writing of reports about experiments and the research itself that could have significant implications for an entire population of patients.  

An entry-level pharmaceutical role could land you a salary of around £18,000 per annum, rising to as much as £150,000 or higher if you eventually become an executive or specialist at a leading firm. But what are the core skills that are required to thrive in this stimulating and rewarding field?

The skills that make all the difference

Pharmaceutical workers are expected to possess any of a wide range of core skills, depending on their specific area and level of responsibility. These include good interpersonal skills and an ability to explain information in an easily understandable way to the public.

Good employees in this industry also tend to be highly organised, methodical and accurate, also having good maths and IT skills. They should be able to work both alone and as part of a team, prioritise projects and even apply a certain level of business knowledge, if applicable.

From project planning to managerial skills

An ability to plan ahead projects well is key in the pharmaceutical field, given the ever-present need to identify tasks, allocate resources and estimate costs.

Your ability to work as part of a team is likely to be routinely tested during your time as a pharmaceutical worker, with any prior experience in team building invaluable for suitably understanding and dealing with the distinct group dynamics and group development that apply to this sector.

As in virtually every other job role - certainly any that would be within the scope of a science recruitment agency - communication and presentation skills are also essential for pharmaceutical staffers, who need to be able to understand the relationship between their own communication style and skills and their all-round effectiveness in their role.

Should you rise to a managerial role in this highly performance-oriented sector, you will also need to be skilled at delivering constructive feedback and resolving conflicts.

Talk to Hyper Recruitment Solutions about your pharmaceutical career

From risk analysis and time management to decision making and delegation, there are many other core skills that will serve you well in the pharmaceutical industry, but the aforementioned make good starting points for further investigations of the right roles in this field for you.

Remember that here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, one of the most acclaimed science recruitment agencies active today, we can cater for a wide range of specialist skill sets in the pharmaceutical sector, encompassing - but not restricted to - regulatory affairs, quality assurance, research and development, engineering, clinical research and consumer insight.

For more information on how our highly experienced and knowledgeable science recruitment specialists can aid you into this highly competitive but exciting science industry, please contact us now by phone, email or our simple online enquiry form.  


Whether the role that you have your eye on is in R&D, quality assurance or such a specific field as pharmacology or molecular biology, there's one challenge that you will almost certainly have to face: the job interview.

You might think that a great interview performance in front of a recruitment team is all about what you say, but actually, what you do is hardly any less important.

It's something that a prospective employer will begin to judge as soon as you step into the interview room - that's right, before you even say anything.

Getting your eye contact right

Eye contact with the interviewer is one of the most important things to incorporate into your body language, as it signals that you are interested in and paying attention to them.

However, there's an art to getting eye contact right. Relentlessly fixing your eyes to those of the interviewer right through your exchange may be unsettling or even make you look blank and uninterested.

Instead, go for what body language expert Dr Lillian Glass calls "direct face contact", whereby every two seconds, you look at a different part of the interviewer's face, rotating from their eyes, to their nose, to their lips.

Using your head is important, too

Combining the aforementioned eye and face contact with the occasional nodding of your head further indicates your attentiveness and understanding of what the interviewer is saying.

Such nods can be further complemented with smiling at appropriate moments and laughing when the interviewer does, all of which helps to show your personality.

Try to resist interrupting the interviewer, and when it's your turn to speak, maintain an even and polite tone of voice that is neither overly soft and timid, nor too loud and domineering.

Strike the right pose

Where many candidates for jobs fail in achieving the right body language is not getting their overall body posture right.

There's a big difference, for instance, between the leaning forward that we all naturally do when we are engaged in a conversation, and the slouching that simply makes you look uninterested. To achieve the former, lean only slightly forward, with your chest high but your shoulders back and down.

Again, much of achieving the right overall body language is all about balance. It's a good idea, for instance, to gently mimic the positive body language of your interviewer, such as a subtle nod or posture change.

Matching their handshake works well too, but an overly firm handshake can suggest arrogance, while a weak one may indicate someone who is precisely that.

Body language is an in-depth field that we cannot possibly cover comprehensively here. Nonetheless, these basic rules should help you to improve your interview technique when competing for the most sought-after jobs. 

It's one of the big questions that you will ask yourself during your life: how do I find my dream job?

It's not necessarily as simple a question that it sounds, even for those who already know their interest is in jobs. After all, is your idea of a 'dream job' something that you love and are good at, or is there a specific ambition associated with it, such as a certain lifestyle or salary?

Here are five of our favourite tips for landing your ideal role in 2016.

1. Go on a journey of discovery

What is it that you actually want in a job? What are you passionate about? To what kind of jobs (or indeed, any jobs) do your existing skills and interests best match, and if you are deficient in any area, what do you need to do next?

Assess yourself with career tools like those of the National Careers Service, research particular fields like immunology, chemistry or clinical work, get in touch with experts in your desired sector about how to break into it... there's plenty that you can learn with little more than a computer and an Internet connection.

2. Focus on steady, incremental progress

Many people may have yearned for a job change for years, only to find themselves procrastinating over actually taking the steps to get there.

You don't need to turn your career on its head with a day or week - instead, focus on smaller things, such as attending a relevant event or registering with a recruitment agency, that will help you steadily towards your goal.

3. Don't think only about the money

There's a saying that if you find a job you love, you will never work a day in your life.

It's true in many ways. While you obviously can't completely discount the money element, allowing it to dominate your job search is rarely a reliable way to find your dream job, which is - after all - the whole objective behind this article.

4. Gradually ease into your new career

Unless you are a recent or soon-to-be graduate or have sufficient financial backing to undertake a long unpaid internship in your desired role, and certainly if you already have a steady job, you may be reluctant to make the big jump into a new career.

The good news is that you don't have to - indeed, it may be best for you not to risk everything. Don't feel guilty about keeping your steady existing job for now while taking a part-time course, volunteering or work shadowing to explore your potential career change.

5. Be realistic about what constitutes a 'dream job'

Even the most popular and well-paid jobs have their positive and negative aspects, but at the same time, don't lapse into thinking that literally any job that pays is a 'dream' one.

No job situation is absolutely perfect, but there are definitely roles that will make you feel more rewarded than others.

Keep an open mind, prepare to work hard and contact one of the leading recruitment agencies, Hyper Recruitment Solutions about how we can power your career to new levels of success in 2016!  

It seems almost impossible these days to avoid social media, and indeed, many of us - particularly the Millennials who have grown up around smartphone and tablet communication - routinely use social networks for both personal and professional purposes.

However, while 73% of 18 to 34-year olds found their last job through social media, it's also true that 94% of recruiters either already use social networks for recruiting or plan to do so.

That makes it extremely important for those hunting for science jobs - in sectors ranging from biology and chemistry to pharmacology and immunology - to have a social media profile that says the right things about their professional self.  

The big difference made by social media to your job search

It's been a long time since LinkedIn was the only social media platform used for professional purposes, with Facebook and Twitter by no means merely the homes of amusing cat pictures or frivolous celebrity tweets.

The truth is that, whatever social media platforms you are active on - Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram and/or various others - everything that you say on them contributes to your overall 'employee brand'.

That means even those rants about late-running trains or annoying relatives count - and they don't necessarily reflect well on you. Even worse, however, is when your professional life is the subject of those rants - with those tweeting about a bad day at work risking the loss of their job.

Focus on LinkedIn - but not exclusively

While it is important to pay attention to everything that you say across all of your social media accounts - just like the most eagle-eyed recruitment agencies will be doing when considering your candidacy - the most attractive LinkedIn profile is a particular must-have.

After all, from a professional point of view, LinkedIn remains the most important social network, with 48% of recruiters making it their sole focus for social outreach. Some employers have been completely ditched CVs in favour of LinkedIn recruiting.

So, remember to complete your LinkedIn profile as much as possible, ensure that you refer to the same job title across all of your social communications and always challenge the appropriateness of whatever content you post.

The stakes are high in today's social media world

Being professional may be easier on LinkedIn, but on less career-oriented social platforms, it is much easier to suffer those all too common lapses that may cost you the chance of your dream role - perhaps without you even knowing.

Do you want to ensure that you are in the best position possible to compete for the very best jobs in 2016?

If so, explore the different fields that we cover, read about our complete Candidate Commitment and get in touch with our experts here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions today. 

The established wisdom in job interview preparation is that while dressing well will never overcome deficiencies in what you actually say in front of a prospective employer, it can nonetheless play a big role in projecting a more positive image of yourself.

Indeed, there have even been indications recently that the saying "the clothes make the man (or woman)" has more truth to it than many of us realise, a study cited in The Atlantic finding evidence that people's thought processes change when they wear a suit.

So, you might know the importance of dressing smartly when being interviewed for jobs - but what exactly does that entail?

How suitable 'interview wear' differs between the sexes

The basic rules of interview dress arguably don't change much whether you are a man or a woman - you are still best advised to wear something comfortable and that you actually feel confident in. It's a good idea to go for 'safer' colours like black, not using more than three colours across your entire outfit, while you should also pay attention to all of those 'small' aspects, such as shoes and socks.

Beyond these broad principles, if you are attending an interview for a role, whether it is in chemistry, pharmacology, immunology or a different scientific or technical field altogether, you will almost certainly be expected to dress more formally than the 'business casual' that can be prevalent in interviews for other job sectors.

What men might wear to a science job interview

A good rule of thumb is to dress one level more formal than would be expected in the day-to-day job. For men, that often means opting for darker, more sober colours, choosing cotton instead of linen on account of the latter's tendency to crease easily, and brown or black shoes - leather rather than suede.

Colours are an important consideration for men, which at the most basic level, means avoiding distracting or garish ties and socks. Also give thought to colour combinations and coordination - while blue can be made to work with brown, the same cannot be said of black and brown.

Some good dress pointers for women

Suits aren't merely timeless - they also effortlessly cross gender lines. Further down one's outfit is a different story, with women needing to choose between trousers and a skirt. If opting for the latter, the distance between the hemline and the knee should not exceed the length of one biro.

Women, like men, are advised to wear darker colours like black, navy or brown, although a lighter, plainer colour can be a good choice in the summer. Scarfs can also be a source of brighter colour, but patterns anywhere are generally a no-no. Any blouse is best plain, and heels should not be too high.

While many would reasonably argue that there are no hard-and-fast rules governing what to wear to an interview with a recruitment agency, the above should nonetheless constitute sound guidelines for the many of us who consider the thorny issue of interview wear almost as intimidating as the interview itself.   

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