Scientist Quiz

Nearly 7,000 people (and counting!) have taken Hyper Recruitment Solutions' What Type of Scientist Are You? quiz since we launched it earlier this year.

And who knows? Maybe we inspired some of those individuals to consider a career that had never even occurred to them before! For instance, have you ever thought about how your innate problem-solving skills might serve you well as a data scientist? Or how your love of animals might translate into a rewarding career in zoology?

If not, be sure to take the quiz yourself before you read on to find out what results everyone else has been getting!

The Most Popular Results

Science Quiz Results - Graph

As you can see, there's been a lot of variety in the results that people have been getting from our quiz - some people are clinical scientists, some are ecologists, and some are better suited to biochemistry.

The 3 most popular results are:

  1. Geologist (14.4% of people get this result)
  2. Astronomer (13.9% of people get this result)
  3. Physicist (13.4% of people get this result)

This suggests that there are a lot of people out there with analytical minds and a great love for going outdoors - these are qualities that mesh very well with a career in geology!

We've also seen a lot of people show an interest in unlocking the really big mysteries, like whether we're alone in the universe and indeed where the universe came from in the first place. These people would make great astronomers and physicians - the second and third most popular quiz results respectively.

The least popular result was Biologist - just 4.6% of our quiz-takers are best suited to a career in biology, but that's still more than 300 people!

Take the Quiz >   Browse Science Jobs >

What Can Job Interviewers Ask?

The questions you're asked during a job interview should mostly focus on your experience and qualifications. It also gives you and your prospective employer a chance to get to know one another.

What a job interview shouldn't be is an opportunity for the interviewer to ask lots of probing personal questions. In most cases, it's illegal for employers to make hiring decisions based on protected characteristics such as age, race, sexuality, and so on. By extension, it's usually not appropriate to ask about these things in an interview setting.

Sadly, just because it's not allowed doesn't mean that people don't do it. Hyper Recruitment Solutions conducted a survey of 1,000 hiring managers and 1,000 jobseekers, and a stunning 85% of interviewers admitted to asking inappropriate questions in job interviews.

Here's a closer look at some of the subjects that should remain off-limits for interviewers...


Age

Example: What year were you born?

Interviewers are not allowed to ask you your age or date of birth. You also don't have to include this information on your CV if you don't wish to.

55% of the interviewers we surveyed admitted to asking candidates when they were born. 60% stated that they considered this an 'acceptable' question.


Children & Pregnancy

Example: Have you got any plans to start a family?

It's illegal to make hiring decisions based on whether or not the candidate has children and/or plans to have a child in the future. Paid maternity/paternity leave is a right, and employers can't exclude candidates who wish to become parents just because they don't want to grant it. Already being a parent should not be a barrier to getting a job either.

That being said, our survey found that 40% of employers think it's acceptable to ask if a candidate is planning on taking maternity/paternity leave, while 54% find it acceptable to ask whether the candidate has any children already.


Gender & Sexuality

Example: Are you a man or a woman?

Your sexual orientation and gender identity are personal matters that should not have any bearing on your ability to do your job.

In most cases, it is illegal for employers to ask about your sex or your sexuality (although exceptions may be made for positive action schemes, e.g. an initiative to hire more LGBT workers).


Health & Disabilities

Example: Are you physically fit and healthy?

In our survey, 53% of hiring managers admitted to asking the question above. But it's illegal to ask questions about a candidate's health before offering them a job.

Employers in certain industries may require workers to pass a physical exam before starting work. Crucially, though, this should not be part of the recruitment/hiring process - any necessary health checks can only take place once the candidate has been offered the job.


Marital Status & Relationships

Example: Are you in a relationship?

As with gender and sexuality, one's marital status generally has no bearing at all on their suitability for a job. And yet 51% of interviewers we surveyed admitted to asking candidates whether they're married / in a relationship!


Religion

Example: Will you need time off for religious holidays?

It's unlawful to discriminate against someone based on their religious beliefs, so questions about faith should be off-limits at all times during job interviews.

Unfortunately, our survey indicated that just 18% of hiring managers understand that it's illegal to ask questions like 'Will you need time off for religious holidays?' 39% said it was inappropriate, but not illegal, while 43% felt that this question was acceptable.


Where You're From

Example: Where were you born?

Questions like 'Where were you born?' and 'Where's that accent from?' may seem innocuous enough, but again, they're not appropriate for an interview environment. Sadly, a large number of interviewers think these questions are acceptable - for instance, 47% of those surveyed stated that it's acceptable to ask the origin of a candidate's accent.


More useful links from HRS:

Tell us what you look for when hiring! Our survey takes just 2-3 minutes to complete.

Employer Survey

We’re asking employers what they look for in job applicants. As a prestigious recruitment company, it’s important to us that we identify what really matters to you when looking to fill a vacancy – helping applicants become better means increasing the quality of applications you receive. Click here to take the survey!

Why complete our survey?

Here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we know just how frustrating it can be when job applicants don’t get the basics right - after all, there's so much advice out there to help you get it right! But that advice can often be contradictory, and the job market is made up of so many different roles and sectors that it's sometimes hard to know which rules apply across the board.

That's where our survey comes in. Each response from an employer or hiring manager gives us a better idea of what applicants can do better - so don’t miss the chance to have your say on what really matters to you during the recruitment process. It takes just 2-3 minutes, and it really makes a difference!

What areas does the survey cover?

This survey covers virtually every aspect of the job application process, from CV length to providing suitable references. We hope that, by collecting solid feedback on these topics from real-life employers, our survey will be a real help to job seekers who aren't quite sure where to start.

Complete the survey now >

Who are we?

Hyper Recruitment Solutions are an elite recruitment company specialising in the science and technology sectors. We aim to create a better world for employers and job seekers alike - click here to learn about the services we provide for employers.

Pharmaceutical roles can be very rewarding, and there's a lot of demand in this sector right now!

Pharmaceutical Role

The pharmaceutical industry plays an important role in healthcare. After all, medicines have the potential to diagnose, cure and prevent diseases and illness. This means you could be involved in saving lives and helping others every day.

But if that isn’t a convincing enough reason to get involved in this industry, below we outline our top five reasons why you should consider a career in pharmaceuticals.

1. It's extremely rewarding

First of all, working in a pharmaceutical role can be extremely rewarding. As mentioned above your work and knowledge can save lives and help others – what’s more rewarding then that!

Everything you do will make an impact. Whether this is providing advice to someone on the best remedies for their back pain or informing someone on the correct dosage for their prescription. And this means that you’ll leave work every day feeling positive and satisfied that you’re making a real difference.

What’s more, you will be interacting with patients and their families. You will be able to see the struggles people are facing and connect with them as individuals. This can be fulfilling as you see the results of your assistance first hand.

2. Large demand in the industry

It goes without saying that people will always need medication. Think about how many pharmacies are in your local area, most places will have one every five miles. The pharmaceutical industry isn’t restricted to the typical Lloyds Pharmacy in towns either, there’s pharmaceutical roles in hospitals and laboratories too. After all, people have to research, check and monitor the safety of new drugs and treatments before they are used in mainstream procedures.

Therefore, you will have brilliant job security as there are a huge number of opportunities available in the industry. This can be very reassuring, especially given the ongoing economic uncertainty in the UK right now.

3. Career opportunities

When considering what career path to take it’s important to think about the future prospects. Working in a pharmaceutical role won’t disappoint in this area and can have brilliant opportunities for career progression. There are many different paths you can take in the industry and each has room for progression and promotion.

For example, as a community pharmacist there will be chances for you to work in managerial roles or you could even set up your own business. This means that you can rest assured that choosing a career in pharmaceuticals leaves you open to a range of opportunities.

4. Salary

The average salary for a pharmacist can range from anywhere between £26,500 and £83,000 a year according to the National Career Service. This salary is above the average UK earning, another huge benefit of working in this industry. And with experience, you can expect to be on the higher end of this pay range as well.

As with many jobs, the more responsibilities you take on, the bigger pay packet you can expect. Plus, there may be opportunities to earn more than this for those who choose to manage their own pharmaceutical company or climb up the ranks in a specific area.

5. Flexibility

The flexible nature of jobs in this industry is a good reason to consider a pharmaceutical role. First, wherever you live or want to live, there will be job prospects for you whether that’s in a big city, the countryside or even abroad. Not many jobs have these prospects so it’s great if you want the freedom to choose where you work.

Furthermore, unlike many health sector professions you will have more flexibility in your work hours. While some pharmacists may have to work overnight shifts it’s also common to work traditional 9 to 5 hours at many places too. Also if you want to work part-time this would be possible to arrange.

In conclusion

If you want a rewarding job with a chance to help people every day and make a difference, you should consider a pharmaceutical role. While there may be challenging aspects to a job in the healthcare sector, it can provide you with a brilliant career full of prospects and opportunities!

This post was written by CV-Library, one of the fastest-growing job boards in the UK. CV-Library hosts over 165,000 jobs every month: from software development to sales. It also owns a range of sector specific career sites, including JobsMedical.

Graduate writing CV

You've graduated from university, and now you're on the hunt for your dream job. But having the right degree, the right skills, and even the right work experience means nothing if you don't know how to lay it all out on your CV!

A good CV needs to make a lasting impression on the person reading it. The average employer spends mere seconds scanning each applicant's CV, so it's crucial to make sure that yours really grabs their attention. Follow our graduate CV guide to make sure your document hits all the right notes.

Personal Information

This section should include your key personal details, such as:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Contact number
  • Email address
Feel free to include other information - such as the fact that you have a clean driving licence and access to your own vehicle - if you think it may give an edge over other applicants. If you are currently employed, mention this here (along with the notice period you will need to serve before leaving).

Skills & Expertise

This is where you should talk about your skills as they pertain to the job you're after. It is crucial to highlight skills that are relevant / transferable to the position - examples may include:

  • Strong problem solving skills
  • A good understanding of relevant regulations / legal matters
  • The ability to work in a team
  • Good communication skills
This is your opportunity to show off the skills and expertise that make you the perfect candidate for the job! 

Experience & Education

This is the juiciest and most important part of your CV. List all of your past work/education experiences in chronological order, starting with the most recent and working backwards. Include start/end dates, a brief description of each role, a brief list of what you achieved or learned in that role, and any qualifications/grades earned.

It is again important to focus on experience and education that is relevant to the job in question, as this will look good to your potential employer. For example, if you're applying for a scientific position, make sure you list your most impressive scientific experiences and qualifications. If you do not have any relevant work experience, try to focus on education and any transferable skills you've picked up over the course of your life thus far.

Interests & Hobbies

This is where you can detail the activities that you enjoy in your spare time. Remember, though: the employer does not want to read your life story! Ideally, the activities listed here will complement the information you've given elsewhere in your CV; for instance, if it's a scientific position that you're applying for, you might state that you like to read the latest science news and keep up with trending topics. This reinforces your interest in the position and will look better than saying 'I like playing video games and watching Netflix'.

References

It's common practice to state 'References available on request' at the end of a CV. That said, if you have strong, relevant references available, this is another opportunity to stand out from the other applicants. Some positions may state that references are required, so be sure to know exactly what is expected of you before proceeding.

*

Including all of the above on your CV should get you well on your way to securing the job you want! Remember not to waffle and to focus on what's really important at all times. Also, check for spelling and grammar mistakes, as these will really take the shine off what you've written. Finally, consider tailoring your CV to each job you apply for - different roles will require different skills, and a one-size-fits-all approach doesn't always pay off!

If you need help with your job hunt, please don't hesitate to contact Hyper Recruitment Solutions for expert assistance.

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