New Year Fireworks

An article recently published on Buzzfeed offered a number of suggestions for job seekers who are hoping to land their 'dream role' in the new year. The tips were fairly wide-ranging, touching on everything from cleaning up your social media accounts to choosing the right interview clothes.

Even so, we believe that we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions can add a few extra tips to the list - if you're serious about getting a new job in 2018, here are 5 more things that you should keep in mind:

1. Ask somebody else to read your CV.

Before you send your CV to any potential employers, give it to a trusted friend or family member and ask them to give it a quick read-through. Your proof-reader will hopefully catch any spelling / grammar mistakes that you failed to spot yourself, but more importantly, they'll be able to tell you whether or not the document is a fair representation of your abilities and experiences. It may just be that you're selling yourself short!

2. Tailor your CV to each job you apply for.

Once you've finished writing your CV, it's easy to just send exactly the same version to every prospective employer. But tweaking your CV each time you send it - tailoring it to the specific role you're applying for - can be a very worthwhile endeavour. You don't have to start from scratch every time you begin a new job application, but you should assess each job description and make sure that your CV is emphasising the right skills and focusing on the most relevant parts of your career history in each case.

3. Eliminate all filler from your cover letter.

When applying for certain jobs, you will be required to accompany your CV with a cover letter that explains why you're applying for the role in question (and what makes you a good fit for it). Your cover letter is a great opportunity to make a glowing first impression, but no matter what you decide to put in this document, it needs to be concise and to-the-point. Once you've written your cover letter, read back over it and make sure that every single sentence has a point - if it doesn't add anything to the picture you're trying to paint, delete it! Employers won't enjoy reading a lot of pointless waffle that wastes their precious time, and a shorter, punchier cover letter will likely make more of an impact anyway.

4. Know how you're getting to the interview.

Showing up late for an interview is almost always a surefire way to not get the job. Once you've been told where you're being interviewed, take the time to plan your journey carefully: will you be walking, driving, or taking public transport? What time will you need to set out in order to arrive on time? Do you have an umbrella in case it rains on the day? Planning is key if you want to be sure of arriving on time (and not looking too dishevelled because you had to rush!).

5. Didn't get the job? Ask for feedback.

Even an unsuccessful job application can be valuable if you're able to learn from it and improve your approach for next time. If a prospective employer tells you that you didn't get the job, thank them for their time and ask them if they would be willing to provide any feedback. Did your answers leave something to be desired? Could you have dressed more appropriately for the interview? Was it simply a question of experience? You can't control every aspect of your job application, but constructive feedback can give you a better idea of what employers are looking for and how to present yourself in the best possible way.

Useful links:

How to prepare for a Job Interview

Now that you've been offered a job interview, it's time to buckle down and prepare for what's ahead.

Many people think they don't need to prepare for a job interview. It's tempting to believe that your qualifications alone will be enough to get you the job, or that the interview is just a way for the employer to get to know you. Though both of these statements are true to an extent, they are certainly not the whole story.

We at Hyper Recruitment Solutions have helped countless candidates to secure their dream jobs, so today we're going to share some of our best tips on how to prepare for a job interview.

The following tips should stand you in very good stead when the time comes to sit down with your potential employer.

Research the company

Researching your potential employer is one of the most important steps when preparing for a job interview. Hopefully, if you've applied for the job, you already know a little bit about the company anyway; nevertheless, read through the company's website, find out what they do, what their values are, their past projects, their future ambitions, and so forth.

The most important things to take note of are as follows:

  • How long has the company been around?
  • How did they get to where they are?
  • Who do they work with?
  • Who are their competitors?
  • What are their company values?
  • What do you like about the company?
This information will also help you to make sure that this is the company you want to be working for.

Google yourself

In much the same way as you've been researching the company, your potential employer will most likely conduct their own research on you. So try to think like the employer. What's the first thing they'll do when they want to find out more about a potential candidate? That's right: Google them!

Google your name and check what comes up. If your Facebook profile shows up, complete with lots of photos from drunken nights out, be sure to check your account's privacy settings. If some unsavoury images of you appear in Google Images, be sure to delete those pictures from the place where you uploaded them.

Likewise, be sure to delete any controversial posts that may have seemed like a funny joke at the time, but could potentially breach company policy if associated with you. You don't want your potential employer to get the wrong opinion of you!

Prepare for the interview questions

Most job interviews come with a standard set of questions. You know the ones: 'what are your weaknesses?', 'where do you see yourself in five years?', 'provide an example of when you lead a team'. A good way to prepare for a job interview is to write out your answers to these questions and revise. If you don't know the standard questions, you should read our blog post about common job interview questions.

A good tip when preparing for these questions is to try and think of unique answers. Your potential employer will most likely ask every candidate these questions, and may therefore have heard many of the same answers over and over again. Think hard about these questions and try to provide an answer that provides your interviewer with an insight into who you are (rather than just another cliché that tells them next to nothing).

Dress sharp

We are often told to not judge a book by its cover, but interviewers only have a limited time with each candidate, and first impressions are incredibly important.

Dressing smart for your job interview not only shows your potential employer that you really care about this job, it can also give you a confidence boost. If you feel like you suit the part and look good, you will feel more at ease during your interview. Confidence is an attractive quality in a situation that usually incites nerves, so prepare for your job interview by making yourself feel more confident.

For more advice on this front, read our blog post about what to wear to a job interview.

Prepare your journey

Our final tip on how to prepare for your job interview is to be on time (early, if possible!) to your interview. If you are late, this is a clear indicator to your potential employer that you don't care enough about the job that's up for grabs.

Plan ahead and prepare your journey. If the company is based somewhere that's not local to you, check your travel times and the traffic rigorously prior to the interview. If you think you may be late, be sure to call ahead and let them know why you will be late. After all, a traffic jam can be forgiven as long as you handle it professionally and reasonably.

Good luck! We hope our tips on how to prepare for a job interview have helped you. If you're still looking for your dream job, you can browse the latest science and technology jobs here.

Job interview questions and answers

So you've secured a job interview - congrats! The next step is to start preparing for the interview questions that you might be asked.

As you may already know, there are a number of typical questions and answers that come up at every interview. Today we're going to look at what these could be and the best way to answer them.

'Tell me about yourself.'

While this may seem like the easiest interview question to answer, if you're caught off-guard it can actually be one of the most difficult. What exactly do employers want to hear when they ask this question? Is it your academic history, your ambitions, your reasons for applying?

A little bit of each topic is perhaps the best way to answer this interview question. Be sure to detail previous academic history, ambitions, and reasons for applying that make you a great fit for the job. Make sure you don't ramble, though, and make sure all of the information is relevant. The employer is trying to understand who you are as a person and how you would fit into the company.

'Why should we hire you?'

You'll find that you get asked this question in most job interviews, so it's an important one to prepare an answer for. Though it may seem like a rather difficult question to answer, the employer is actually just trying to see how you have thought of yourself in relation to the company.

It's valuable to know how your skills suit the job role, but remember, the employer wants to know how you fit into their company specifically. So when it comes to answering this question, be sure to include details of how your skills suit the job role and how you, personally, suit the company.

This interview question gives you a great opportunity to stand out, so make sure your answer is both memorable and concise. For further advice and information on how to best answer this question, read our blog here.

'What do you know about this company?'

This may seem like a bit of a vain interview question from the company's side, but yet again, it's a very important part of many job interviews. Most companies are proud of their history, culture, and ambitions, and they will want to know you value the same things.

To prepare for this interview question, be sure to do extensive research on the company. Look up important things like:

  • When they started
  • Their biggest projects to date
  • Research they've conducted (if applicable)
  • The company's values and brand identity
Not only will these things help you to answer the question, they'll also help you decide if this is actually a job you want.

'Why did you leave your last job?'

This, understandably, is a very common interview question. Most employers want to know what led to you leaving your last company as it will help them to understand what you look for in a job. Honesty is always the best policy, but if (for instance) you had to resign from your last job because you had a falling out with your boss, be tactful about how you word this.

Here's an example: instead of saying 'I left because I hated my last manager', you could say 'I left my job because the company culture didn't feel like a good fit for me'. It's best to always be reasonably respectful of your previous company - you don't want the interviewer to think you'll end up bad-mouthing their company down the line.

'What's your greatest achievement?'

Compared to some of the other questions we've covered today, this is a much nicer one to prepare for. The best way to prepare for this question is to think back through all the things you're proud of. It's best to think of professional achievements, but you can use more general life events too as long as they reflect your suitability for the job.

You can use any awards you've won, successes with clients, big breakthroughs, or even the grade you received at university. You could even use the birth of your child or your marriage if you think this is relevant to the role; for example, if becoming a parent has made you more conscientious, or planning your wedding made you more organised, these are unique answers that will stand out in an employer's mind.

We hope these common interview questions and answers have helped you prepare for your upcoming interview! If you're still looking for jobs, click here to browse the latest science jobs from HRS.

Should I Move Abroad for Work?

Have you ever considered moving abroad for work? Given the sense of unease surrounding careers in the United Kingdom due to current political events, many people have found themselves in the same boat.

However, this is not a decision to take lightly. There are several factors that should play into your decision to move abroad for work, and it’s important to think carefully before making this big life choice.

Here are some things to consider before deciding to uproot and continue your career in another country. 


Job Market

United Kingdom:

Despite Brexit fears, it seems as if the science industry in the UK is still growing. A study by the Science Industry Partnership found these encouraging statistics concerning the UK science industry:

“The forecast scenarios illustrate that overall the science industry's cumulative demand for staff between 2015 and 2025 will be in the range of 180,000 to 260,000 staff. […]

>"The majority of demand will be replacement demand for people leaving the industry, largely due to retirement; accounting for between 177,000 to 185,000 jobs across the science industries by 2025. New jobs created due to growth will account for up to 77,000 jobs.”

So staying in the UK is not only plausible, it is potentially quite a lucrative move. With the UK’s high demand for scientific minds, the job opportunities here should continue to increase over the coming years.

Working Abroad:

Of course, moving abroad is appealing for many reasons, including a change of climate and the chance to explore a different culture. Another important factor is the increase in salary that is offered by some countries. Some of the best-paying countries for scientists are Switzerland, the USA, Japan, Australia and Germany. With Switzerland offering an average annual salary of $95,000, you can see why some people are tempted to move abroad.

Depending on what field you are in, there is also further opportunity for funding in the science industry abroad. This depends on the country and the specific type of scientific research you are looking at. If you’re currently looking for funding, you may want to read this article on some of the countries who are putting the most money into research.


Personal Preference

Everyone is different, and whether you like the idea of travelling or have family commitments that make you less inclined to move abroad for work, the choice is ultimately yours. If you are unhappy with your current situation, moving abroad offers the chance for a new start. However, it is also more than possible to have a fulfilling career here in the UK, and you shouldn't feel pressured to move abroad.


Will I be happy if I move abroad for work?

Again, as mentioned before, this will depend on yourself and your circumstances. However, studies have shown that different countries do have varying levels of happiness and life satisfaction. You can find the full study here. This may affect your decision concerning what country you want to move to for work.

We at HRS offer a range of jobs in the science industry, both in the UK and abroad. To find one that suits you, be sure to keep an eye on our job listings. We update them frequently and you can find them here.

For any questions about our job listings or advice about our recruitment service, feel free to contact us today.

How to Quit Your Job

People leave their jobs for all sorts of reasons - whether it's because of poor management, low morale, or simply feeling like it's time for a change. However, whatever the reason for your departure may be, it's important that you leave your job in a professional manner - it's never wise to burn bridges, especially if you want a good reference from your current employer!

Even if you're happy with your job, and you're leaving on good terms, resigning can be difficult. So, to make it a little easier for you, here are a few tips on how to quit your job gracefully:

Give Plenty of Notice

Most employment contracts state how much notice you must give when you live, and it's important that you abide by this as it gives your employer time to prepare for your departure. However, this may not always be the case; your employer doesn't have to accept the notice you give, and your employment could be terminated immediately.

Write a Resignation Letter

No matter how you feel when resigning, you must write a resignation letter. Writing a resignation letter will help you maintain a positive relationship with your employer while also making it easier for you to move on to your next job.

Keep your resignation letter simple, brief, and as positive as possible - there's no point criticising your employer if it was your choice to leave the company. Offer to help during the transition and afterwards within reason.

Ask for a Letter of Recommendation

Before you leave the company, it's a good ideas to ask for a letter of recommendation from your employer. A good reference from your former boss is important, as your future employment may on rely on this. It's important to get it in writing so you can keep it (unless there is an HR department that keeps a record of all references).

Check All Details & Return Company Property

Find out what benefits and salary you are entitled to receive upon leaving. Make sure you discussed your unused leave and sick pay, and whether you can cash in or roll over your pension plan. and whether you can cash in or roll over your pension plan. Also, if you have taken any property home from work, make sure you return it to your employer - the last thing you want to do is annoy your employer by stealing something that belongs to them.

Inform Your Workmates

Informing your workmates of your departure is important, as they may have to plan ahead to cover you in your absence. However, you should sort out all the details with your managers first, as they may want to inform the other staff themselves.

If you work in the science sector and you're thinking about leaving your job but don't have another job to go to, you may be interested in our recruitment services. Please click here to view our range of job opportunities.

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