Pharmaceutical roles can be very rewarding, and there's a lot of demand in this sector right now!

Pharmaceutical Role

The pharmaceutical industry plays an important role in healthcare. After all, medicines have the potential to diagnose, cure and prevent diseases and illness. This means you could be involved in saving lives and helping others every day.

But if that isn’t a convincing enough reason to get involved in this industry, below we outline our top five reasons why you should consider a career in pharmaceuticals.

1. It's extremely rewarding

First of all, working in a pharmaceutical role can be extremely rewarding. As mentioned above your work and knowledge can save lives and help others – what’s more rewarding then that!

Everything you do will make an impact. Whether this is providing advice to someone on the best remedies for their back pain or informing someone on the correct dosage for their prescription. And this means that you’ll leave work every day feeling positive and satisfied that you’re making a real difference.

What’s more, you will be interacting with patients and their families. You will be able to see the struggles people are facing and connect with them as individuals. This can be fulfilling as you see the results of your assistance first hand.

2. Large demand in the industry

It goes without saying that people will always need medication. Think about how many pharmacies are in your local area, most places will have one every five miles. The pharmaceutical industry isn’t restricted to the typical Lloyds Pharmacy in towns either, there’s pharmaceutical roles in hospitals and laboratories too. After all, people have to research, check and monitor the safety of new drugs and treatments before they are used in mainstream procedures.

Therefore, you will have brilliant job security as there are a huge number of opportunities available in the industry. This can be very reassuring, especially given the ongoing economic uncertainty in the UK right now.

3. Career opportunities

When considering what career path to take it’s important to think about the future prospects. Working in a pharmaceutical role won’t disappoint in this area and can have brilliant opportunities for career progression. There are many different paths you can take in the industry and each has room for progression and promotion.

For example, as a community pharmacist there will be chances for you to work in managerial roles or you could even set up your own business. This means that you can rest assured that choosing a career in pharmaceuticals leaves you open to a range of opportunities.

4. Salary

The average salary for a pharmacist can range from anywhere between £26,500 and £83,000 a year according to the National Career Service. This salary is above the average UK earning, another huge benefit of working in this industry. And with experience, you can expect to be on the higher end of this pay range as well.

As with many jobs, the more responsibilities you take on, the bigger pay packet you can expect. Plus, there may be opportunities to earn more than this for those who choose to manage their own pharmaceutical company or climb up the ranks in a specific area.

5. Flexibility

The flexible nature of jobs in this industry is a good reason to consider a pharmaceutical role. First, wherever you live or want to live, there will be job prospects for you whether that’s in a big city, the countryside or even abroad. Not many jobs have these prospects so it’s great if you want the freedom to choose where you work.

Furthermore, unlike many health sector professions you will have more flexibility in your work hours. While some pharmacists may have to work overnight shifts it’s also common to work traditional 9 to 5 hours at many places too. Also if you want to work part-time this would be possible to arrange.

In conclusion

If you want a rewarding job with a chance to help people every day and make a difference, you should consider a pharmaceutical role. While there may be challenging aspects to a job in the healthcare sector, it can provide you with a brilliant career full of prospects and opportunities!

This post was written by CV-Library, one of the fastest-growing job boards in the UK. CV-Library hosts over 165,000 jobs every month: from software development to sales. It also owns a range of sector specific career sites, including JobsMedical.

Graduate writing CV

You've graduated from university, and now you're on the hunt for your dream job. But having the right degree, the right skills, and even the right work experience means nothing if you don't know how to lay it all out on your CV!

A good CV needs to make a lasting impression on the person reading it. The average employer spends mere seconds scanning each applicant's CV, so it's crucial to make sure that yours really grabs their attention. Follow our graduate CV guide to make sure your document hits all the right notes.

Personal Information

This section should include your key personal details, such as:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Contact number
  • Email address
Feel free to include other information - such as the fact that you have a clean driving licence and access to your own vehicle - if you think it may give an edge over other applicants. If you are currently employed, mention this here (along with the notice period you will need to serve before leaving).

Skills & Expertise

This is where you should talk about your skills as they pertain to the job you're after. It is crucial to highlight skills that are relevant / transferable to the position - examples may include:

  • Strong problem solving skills
  • A good understanding of relevant regulations / legal matters
  • The ability to work in a team
  • Good communication skills
This is your opportunity to show off the skills and expertise that make you the perfect candidate for the job! 

Experience & Education

This is the juiciest and most important part of your CV. List all of your past work/education experiences in chronological order, starting with the most recent and working backwards. Include start/end dates, a brief description of each role, a brief list of what you achieved or learned in that role, and any qualifications/grades earned.

It is again important to focus on experience and education that is relevant to the job in question, as this will look good to your potential employer. For example, if you're applying for a scientific position, make sure you list your most impressive scientific experiences and qualifications. If you do not have any relevant work experience, try to focus on education and any transferable skills you've picked up over the course of your life thus far.

Interests & Hobbies

This is where you can detail the activities that you enjoy in your spare time. Remember, though: the employer does not want to read your life story! Ideally, the activities listed here will complement the information you've given elsewhere in your CV; for instance, if it's a scientific position that you're applying for, you might state that you like to read the latest science news and keep up with trending topics. This reinforces your interest in the position and will look better than saying 'I like playing video games and watching Netflix'.

References

It's common practice to state 'References available on request' at the end of a CV. That said, if you have strong, relevant references available, this is another opportunity to stand out from the other applicants. Some positions may state that references are required, so be sure to know exactly what is expected of you before proceeding.

*

Including all of the above on your CV should get you well on your way to securing the job you want! Remember not to waffle and to focus on what's really important at all times. Also, check for spelling and grammar mistakes, as these will really take the shine off what you've written. Finally, consider tailoring your CV to each job you apply for - different roles will require different skills, and a one-size-fits-all approach doesn't always pay off!

If you need help with your job hunt, please don't hesitate to contact Hyper Recruitment Solutions for expert assistance.

Further Reading:

Graduate Job Interview

So, you've finally graduated from university and - better still - secured an interview for the dream job that you've been working towards for the last few years. Problem is, you don't really know what to expect or how to prepare yourself for the interview.

Many people think that job interviews are high-pressure situations where a single slip-up can ruin one's chance of success, but with the right preparation, you will be ready for whatever is thrown your way. So don't panic - Hyper Recruitment Solutions are here to help!

Follow our essential graduate interview tips to give yourself the best possible chance of impressing the interviewer and getting the job you want.

Research

  • Learn about the company's history and the work they've done in the past.

  • Find out what the company's goals and values are.

  • Ensure that you understand the role you're applying for (including responsibilities and requirements).

Rehearsing

  • Decide which of your skills and qualities you would like to highlight to the interviewer, and make sure you can prove that you have them (e.g. by mentioning achievements and experiences where you demonstrated those qualities).

  • Find a list of commonly-asked interview questions and write out your own answers in advance.

  • Get someone to ask you questions that you haven't specifically prepared for - this will practice your ability to improvise and bring every answer back to your key skills and qualities.

Appearance

  • Dress smartly and appropriately for the job. If you're struggling to pick an outfit, read our What to Wear guide.

  • Make sure that your clothes are washed, dried and ironed prior to the interview.

  • Ensure that your hair is neat and tidy - get a haircut if necessary.

  • Do not wear excessive make-up or accessories.

Travel

  • Find out where and when the interview will be held.

  • Plan your route and method of travel (walking, driving, or public transport).

  • Set off early and allow plenty of time for delays/traffic.

  • Stay dry! Take a coat and/or umbrella just in case it rains.

Miscellaneous

  • Take an extra copy of your CV so you have the same information in front of you as the interviewer.

  • If necessary, prepare a copy of your certifications and/or examples of past work.

  • Make sure you can provide strong references on request.

We hope these tips will help to put your mind at ease and bring you one step closer to the job of your dreams! If you have any questions or queries regarding your interview, please do not hesitate to get in touch with the HRS team - one of our advisors will be more than happy to help. Good luck!

Further Reading: Why Didn't I Get the Job?

Why Didn't I Get a Job Interview?

Virtually every job seeker experiences rejection at some point in their journey. No matter how much time you spend fine-tuning your CV...no matter how much effort you put into writing your cover letter...no matter how much you really really want the job...there's sadly no guarantee that you'll make it to the interview stage. Sometimes you'll get a politely-worded rejection email from your prospective employer, but sometimes you just won't hear back from them at all.

In either case, you'll probably end up asking yourself:

Why didn't I get an interview?

Today, we'd like to suggest some possible answers to that question. Of course, there are all sorts of reasons why an employer might choose not to offer an interview; it might be that other applicants were more experienced, or that the position had been filled before you even expressed an interest. Sometimes it's just out of your control.

For the purposes of this post, however, we're going to focus on things that you can control. Take these five things into account the next time you apply for a job, and with any luck, you'll be rehearsing answers and picking out an outfit for that big job interview before you know it!

1. Your application was too long and rambling.

It's important to keep your CV and cover letter reasonably concise. When an employer has a huge stack of job applications to go through, they generally won't want to spend too long on each one, so make sure your documents are easy to skim-read. The important details—relevant qualifications, impressive achievements, similar positions you've held in the past—should leap off the page, and that won't happen if they're buried in paragraphs and paragraphs of waffle.

2. Your made spelling / grammar mistakes.

You don't need us to tell you that spelling errors and bad grammar can torpedo even the most qualified candidate's chances of securing a job interview. Always double-check your documents for typos before sending them (and ask a friend or family member to check them too, just to be sure).

3. You didn't tailor your application to the job you were applying for.

Employers can usually tell when you send them the same generic cover letter that you've sent to dozens of other companies. Writing a new document every time you apply for a new job is tedious and time-consuming, but ultimately, you're more likely to get the interview if the employer feels like you're specifically interested in (and suitable for) the role they're offering. Consider tweaking your CV each time you send it, too – you may want to highlight different experiences / achievements for different jobs.

4. You didn't make a convincing enough case for yourself.

The main aim of any job application is to argue that you are the right person for the job in question. When you get rejected for a role you really wanted, go back and read the job description – did your CV and cover letter convincingly argue that you meet the stated requirements? Could you have done a better job of explaining how your previous experiences made you a better prospective employee? Did you shout about your unique talents and skills, or could you have made them clearer?

5. The employer wasn't able to view your application.

It doesn't matter how sensational your job application is if the hiring manager can't open it. When submitting a CV / cover letter, make sure it's in a common file format, and send it to yourself first to make sure it opens without any issues. You might want to view it on a few different devices, too.

Need more job application advice? Read our CV & Cover Letter Checklist, or contact the HRS team to find out how we can help you to get the job you want!

Image from pixabay.com

Application Specialist Jobs

Application specialists are employed by all sorts of different organisations in a wide variety of fields. This can be a very lucrative career for tech-savvy individuals who understand and enjoy working with software and computer systems.

Browse our application specialist jobs here >

What does an application specialist do?

Application specialists work with computer programs and software systems. They are frequently called upon to troubleshoot problems and help other people to use software applications. They may also be responsible for installing, altering and updating software systems.

Which industries employ application specialists?

Software is found in virtually all industry sectors nowadays, and the same applies to application specialists. Any organisation that relies on software to operate might also employ an application specialist to manage their software systems.

That said, the following industries are known to employ an especially large number of application specialists:

  • Biotechnology
  • Healthcare
  • Medical Devices
  • Financial Services

Requirements for application specialist jobs

Specific requirements vary from one job to the next, but application specialists are generally expected to know how to:

  • Use a wide variety of devices and applications
  • Identify and resolve IT-related problems
  • Maintain software systems, keeping them functional and up-to-date
  • Advise customers/colleagues and demonstrate how to use applications

The most important quality for an application specialist to have is a firm understanding of hardware and software. Problem-solving skills are important too, since the application specialist is the person everyone else turns to when a piece of software isn't working properly.

It's not all about working with computers, though. Application specialists are often required to demo new pieces of software and help other individuals to understand the systems they're using, so you can add good communication skills and a friendly demeanour to the list of highly-valued skills in this field.

Think you've got what it takes to succeed as an application specialist? At Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we work with a number of businesses who are looking to employ people like you – click here to view current vacancies!

Image from pexels.com

User Menu

Posts by Keyword

Month List