Across the full glut of science jobs for which one may conceivably apply - ranging from biotechnology and pharmaceutical to engineering and R&D roles - there is the need to make your cv stand out

As much as we may wish to think that we are recruited on the basis of our skills and experiences, without a sufficiently eye-catching CV, such is the intense level of competition for the most desirable roles that it is doubtful we would get hired at all.

If you are wondering how to make your CV stand out, here are five of the best ways to keep eyes lingering on your resume.

1. Mirror the language used in the job posting

With studies indicating that the average recruiter spends just a few seconds considering a CV before accepting or rejecting it, chances are that your CV will only be scanned quite quickly.

You should make the recruiter's job easier, therefore, by including the very terms that are present throughout their initial job posting, to make it even clearer how your skills and experience relate to the role.

2. Avoid clich├ęd terms

So common are terms like 'team player', 'innovative', 'results focused' and 'highly qualified' on the average CV, that they have been reduced to meaningless fluff from the perspective of many hiring managers.

If you can't use more distinctive, unfamiliar terms, at least provide immediate, live examples of how you possess such characteristics, to prevent a bored reader simply drifting to the next CV in the pile.

3. Adapt your resume to each position

This is a source of consternation for so many science recruitment agencies, to the extent that many would regard it as disrespectful not to modify a CV for their specific position.

You might do this by re-arranging what appears on your CV, perhaps grouping your traits by skill area or job function. Alternatively, you might have a reverse chronological CV, which can show how you have gathered competencies relevant to your new position over time.

4. Explain any employment gaps

Many recruiters for science jobs will reject a CV as soon as they see an unaccounted-for gap, preferring to save their limited interviewing time for candidates who don't seem to have something to hide.

It is therefore a better bet to properly explain why you may have been unemployed for a certain period of time, and how you nonetheless used that time productively.

5. Don't be afraid to brag

Your CV is not supposed to be modest. It is there to quickly make a positive impression on a complete stranger, so you should tell them everything great about you that means they need to hire you right now - from relevant previous jobs to coveted awards and big promotions.

If you can convince science recruitment agencies that you are something special, they will be much more likely to urgently call you to interview - whatever the science role for which you are applying.


Whether you are still considering your university options, have completed a PhD or have a long track record in a particular science field behind you, choosing from the vast range of possible science jobs can be an intimidating and overwhelming process.

With popular sectors ranging from immunology and pharmacology to molecular biology and clinical, and with functions within those sectors encompassing clinical research, quality assurance, research and development (R&D) and many more, it would be too difficult for us to give even a brief overview of your possible science career options here.

What we can do, however, is give you some pointers on choosing the science post that would best suit your own background, interests and motivations.

Figuring out your skills, values and interests

Various assessments exist that should help you to clarify your own personal characteristics and how these may lend themselves to various science jobs. These include the National Careers Service's Action Plan tool, as well as the Career Planner accessible through the graduate careers site, Prospects.


More informal ways of determining the best science career direction for you include simply asking yourself what areas at science most interest you and which you are best at, as well as what lifestyle you want and what you actually desire from your longer-term career.

What to consider when comparing jobs

Once you have a reasonable idea of the above, you will be able to begin your job hunt or consider the most appropriate academic course.

When you are thinking about your science job options, you will need to take into account such factors as entry requirements, employment outlook, the job description, salary and conditions and the scope to develop the job.

Is the role that interests you a good match to what you learned about yourself through tools and techniques like the above, and is the job reasonably attainable right now? If not, what do you need to do to have a realistic chance of entering this particular science career?

Imagining yourself on the job

Even having the right skills and experience, however, matters little if you would not actually enjoy the role on a day-to-day basis.

To ascertain this, ask yourself whether the employer would be a good match to your own values, as well as whether the job itself would be rewarding both now and some time into the future, based on your past experiences and motivations. Is this a job that you would even do for free?

Deciding on the right science role entails much serious thought about what matters to you in a job, as well as your likelihood of obtaining work in the field that interests you and the potential for career growth.

As leading science recruitment specialists here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we are always happy to advise those still contemplating the right science career for them - as well as, if appropriate, match them to a suitable role. 

Science Jobs

As a leading and highly compliant recruitment company, here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we take pride in matching those seeking science jobs with the most rewarding roles, particularily the science careers in demand.

While science is naturally a field in which the range of roles is extremely varied - even jobs with the same or similar titles potentially carrying very different responsibilities and calling upon rather distinct skills - the below five roles are some of the main science careers in demand.


Qualified Person (QP)

European regulations dictate that there be a Qualified Person (QP) to decide on batch releases of medicinal products. This is one of the main science careers in demand, as each given batch cannot be certified for release until it has first been thoroughly verified that it was manufactured in accordance with relevant GMP (good manufacturing practice) regulations, which necessitates a wide range of responsibilities for the QP.


Regulatory affairs officer

Also known as a regulatory affairs specialist or manager, a person in this post bridges the gap between companies and regulatory authorities, ensuring the manufacture and distribution of products in line with relevant legislation. Duties typically range from the study of scientific and legal documents to the planning and undertaking of regulatory inspections and product trials.


Clinical research manager

Clinical research managers are given overall responsibility within pharmaceutical or medical fields for preparing protocols and case report forms, the approval of ethics committees and the management of clinical trials. They may also be expected to provide clinical trial materials and ensure that trials are smoothly monitored, through the identification and management of qualified staff and the establishment of suitable audit procedures.


Validation engineer

Validation engineers play a key role in the development and manufacturing process for products ranging from pharmaceuticals to cars, through their measurement, analysis and calibration of the equipment and processes necessary to ensure only the highest quality products.

This job role is a vastly in-demand science career as validation engineers are also required in such sectors as aerospace, biotechnology and computer software. Their duties include testing, the overseeing of other validation technicians' work and the establishment of validation standards.


Packaging Technologist

Another large science career in demand is a Packaging Technologist. This is ideal for those with plenty of design flair and a passion for technology, packaging technologists are involved in the design and development of product packaging. Working with manufacturers and other professionals, packaging technologists operate under time and budgetary constraints to deliver a finished packaging design.

Such goods as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, food and drink, toiletries and household cleaning products all need to be packaged, and a packaging technologist's duties typically include the production of sample packaging, the running of production trials and tests and the creation of artwork in conjunction with packaging designers.

Although the best jobs in these fields can be scarce and the level of competition extremely fierce, Hyper Recruitment Solutions can put job seekers in touch with the most advantageous opportunities for their burgeoning science careers, in keeping with its status as one of the principal science recruitment agencies. We aim to help you have an opportunity to get the most in-demand science jobs. 

Are you on the hunt for a new science job? Take a look at the wide range of science jobs we have available on our Science Job Search page.

"Why should we hire you?" is as common a question on the lips of science recruitment professionals as it is among hiring teams in any other sector, and it takes forms that can easily catch out the ill-prepared interviewee. You may be asked what makes you the right fit for the position, why you are the best candidate for the vacancy or what you would bring to the job - whatever, the gist is much the same. Before you go for the interview you need to ask yourself, "why should you hire me?", and come up with an answer. 

Be employer-focused

One of the first things that any applicant must realise about this question is that they really must answer it from the employer's perspective. It can be easy to effectively only answer why you would like the job - for example, because you have always had an interest in biochemistry or R&D, need the money or would like to move to wherever the role is based. These are not answers to the question of why the employer should hire you.

The frank truth is that a hiring manager does not really care about the benefits to you of getting the job. They're much more concerned about the risk to their position if they make a poor choice of hire, such as someone who leaves the organisation prematurely or does not fit in well with their colleagues or the company philosophy.


 

They are certainly interested, then, in your ability to do the job to an exceptional standard, get on well with your colleagues and bring to bear skills and experiences that make you stand out from the other candidates.

The information that you must give

Therefore, by setting out an answer that clearly details such factors as your industry experience, relevant past accomplishments, soft skills, technical skills, education/training and/or awards/certifications, you are making the hiring manager's professional life much easier.

When you communicate memorably and confidently that you possess these traits that answer the employer's pain points, whether their field is chemistry, molecular biology, immunology or something completely different, they will be more confident to trust you with the role.

But remember...

With this being only one of potentially many interview questions, not all of the above parameters necessarily need to be included in your answer. This question is a golden opportunity to sell yourself for your dream clinical, biochemistry or pharmacology role. However, such 'selling' is generally best done with just three or four powerful points - backed up with easy-to-remember descriptions and/or examples - than with a quickly rifled-off list of 12 strengths that you are unable to explain further.

The employer should be left in no doubt as to your unique combination of relevant experience and skills. "Why should we hire you?" is a question will not be your only opportunity during the interview to make that clear - which is all the more reason to provide well-selected highlights rather than the full catalogue of your credentials.

However, it is so often a memorably convincing answer to this, or any number of the aforementioned similar questions that separates those who secure sought-after science jobs from those who don't. Good luck!


Whether in pharmacology, immunology, quality assurance or R&D, securing those prized science jobs depends on more than just getting your CV right - you will also need to negotiate what may be some seriously bruising interview questions.

Here are just five that you might face, along with suitable responses.

1. Why should you get this job?

This question calls for good pre-interview preparation. Before walking into the room, pick out three to five characteristics from your CV that make you indispensable, backed up with examples. Employers want to see evidence of a strong track record.

2. Where do you see yourself in three to five years?

Responding with "I have no idea" - as truthful as it may be - suggests that you have little idea what direction your career is going in or for how long you intend to be in the job. A much better approach is to say you have carefully assessed your career aims and learned that you can best develop in the role for which you are being interviewer.


3. What was the worst aspect of your last role?

 Again, telling the truth - such as that you hated the hours or your boss - may be tempting, but in doing so, you can inadvertently reveal a weakness of your own. This, of course, is why the question is being asked. It's more advisable to instead say that your responsibilities were not sufficiently challenging - or something similar that would indicate you are ready for the step up.

4. Why is there a gap in your work history?

Answering this one well is much easier if you can demonstrate that you have actually spent your time in-between jobs productively. Employers understand that from time to time, people can lose their jobs and not always immediately find another one. However, time spent looking after family members, volunteering or undertaking freelance projects can all help to make you more marketable from a science recruitment perspective.

5. What is your greatest weakness?

This is yet another question that draws out unwitting admissions of weakness in ill-prepared candidates. You can avoid becoming one of them by stating a 'weakness' that could be equally easy considered a strength - for example, a tendency to say yes and over-commit. Follow this with an example of how you are becoming better at prioritising, and you will look like an even better candidate for the job.

 

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