Future science jobs

'Science' is a very broad term that can cover all sorts of different careers, from storm chaser to venom milker. Sadly (or luckily, depending on your outlook), not all scientific jobs will involve such white-knuckle thrill-seeking or death-defying excitement.

Nevertheless, jobs in science can make for an excellent career path with many intriguing avenues to explore. Better still, with the entire science industry built on constant change and cutting-edge technologies, the future of science jobs is an exciting and potentially lucrative one, particularly if you choose one of the following fields...

Science jobs on the grow

If you're on the hunt for science jobs, you're probably familiar with the term STEM – an acronym relating to jobs within science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Many STEM jobs are hugely important in modern society, and that's likely to remain the case for a very long time to come.

With one eye constantly on the road ahead, science is an industry that holds much promise for the future, so it’s only fitting that the future should also hold much promise for jobs in science. In fact, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labour Statistics, there are certain areas of scientific employment that are predicted to have a very healthy upswing indeed by 2024.

Forensic Science Technician

Glamorised by TV shows like CSI, NCIS and Dexter, the presence of forensic science on the small screen has made a career in this field a rather attractive proposition in recent years – and it’s easy to see why. Arguably one of the meatier jobs on this list, the role of Forensic Science Technician has a number of specialist sub-categories, including DNA, textile fibres and toxicology.

The work itself, however, is somewhat less glamorous than what’s presented on television, typically requiring you to analyse crime scene evidence and summarise your findings in a written report. For this role, you will likely need at least a BSc in Forensic Science or Chemistry and first-hand work experience to boot.

Atmospheric Scientist

One of the more adaptable roles on this list, a job as an Atmospheric Scientist can have you working in a variety of fields relating to the atmosphere. This role could see you studying meteorology and weather, but you might just as easily end up working in public health, focusing on air quality and the impact of pollution.

In order to be considered for a job in Atmospheric Science, you will first need to obtain a degree in – you guessed it – Atmospheric Science. This will provide the opportunity to apply for entry-level positions; however, for the best chance of securing a role in this field, a master’s degree or PhD will give you an extra advantage over other candidates.

Geoscientist

Further delving into the geographical science path, Geoscience investigates the topographical features of the Earth. As a Geoscientist, you can’t be afraid to get your hands dirty because you could find yourself working with soil, rocks and other natural resources in the study of the Earth’s composition.

Often dealing with natural resources such as gas, oil and water, Geoscientists are frequently employed in the energy industry, as well as sectors such as water management, etc. There are also a variety of sub-categories relating to particular specialities, ranging from geophysicist to geochemist and many more in between.

In order to become a Geoscientist, you will likely be required to have a BSc in engineering, physics or chemistry at the very least, while a master’s degree and relevant industry experience in the field is often preferable for employers.

Biomedical Engineer

Biomedical Engineers are tasked with analysing and designing solutions to issues within biology and medicine. This can often involve the design of various biomedical systems and products, including artificial body parts and machines for diagnosing medical problems, as well as a number of other duties surrounding biomedical equipment.

As one might expect, you will typically require a bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering in order to become a Biomedical Engineer; however, you may also be able to work within this field if you have a BSc in an alternate area of engineering, coupled with a graduate degree in biomedical engineering or relevant/adequate first-hand experience.

Computer and Information Systems Manager

A highly technical role of much importance within a business, a Computer and Information Systems Manager is tasked with managing an organisation’s computer activity, taking the reins for all the hardware and software decisions of a company.

As this is a managerial position, you may also have to oversee the other IT personnel on staff, as well as being responsible for the company’s network security. For this role, you will typically need to be educated to degree level in Computer and Information Science and have several years of relevant work experience in support of that degree.

So there you have it: if you’re looking to enter the world of science with a career that will last long into the future, these five future jobs in science are well worth aiming for.

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