Future science jobs

'Science' is a very broad term that can cover all sorts of different careers, from storm chaser to venom milker. Sadly (or luckily, depending on your outlook), not all scientific jobs will involve such white-knuckle thrill-seeking or death-defying excitement.

Nevertheless, jobs in science can make for an excellent career path with many intriguing avenues to explore. Better still, with the entire science industry built on constant change and cutting-edge technologies, the future of science jobs is an exciting and potentially lucrative one, particularly if you choose one of the following fields...

Science jobs on the grow

If you're on the hunt for science jobs, you're probably familiar with the term STEM – an acronym relating to jobs within science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Many STEM jobs are hugely important in modern society, and that's likely to remain the case for a very long time to come.

With one eye constantly on the road ahead, science is an industry that holds much promise for the future, so it’s only fitting that the future should also hold much promise for jobs in science. In fact, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labour Statistics, there are certain areas of scientific employment that are predicted to have a very healthy upswing indeed by 2024.

Forensic Science Technician

Glamorised by TV shows like CSI, NCIS and Dexter, the presence of forensic science on the small screen has made a career in this field a rather attractive proposition in recent years – and it’s easy to see why. Arguably one of the meatier jobs on this list, the role of Forensic Science Technician has a number of specialist sub-categories, including DNA, textile fibres and toxicology.

The work itself, however, is somewhat less glamorous than what’s presented on television, typically requiring you to analyse crime scene evidence and summarise your findings in a written report. For this role, you will likely need at least a BSc in Forensic Science or Chemistry and first-hand work experience to boot.

Atmospheric Scientist

One of the more adaptable roles on this list, a job as an Atmospheric Scientist can have you working in a variety of fields relating to the atmosphere. This role could see you studying meteorology and weather, but you might just as easily end up working in public health, focusing on air quality and the impact of pollution.

In order to be considered for a job in Atmospheric Science, you will first need to obtain a degree in – you guessed it – Atmospheric Science. This will provide the opportunity to apply for entry-level positions; however, for the best chance of securing a role in this field, a master’s degree or PhD will give you an extra advantage over other candidates.

Geoscientist

Further delving into the geographical science path, Geoscience investigates the topographical features of the Earth. As a Geoscientist, you can’t be afraid to get your hands dirty because you could find yourself working with soil, rocks and other natural resources in the study of the Earth’s composition.

Often dealing with natural resources such as gas, oil and water, Geoscientists are frequently employed in the energy industry, as well as sectors such as water management, etc. There are also a variety of sub-categories relating to particular specialities, ranging from geophysicist to geochemist and many more in between.

In order to become a Geoscientist, you will likely be required to have a BSc in engineering, physics or chemistry at the very least, while a master’s degree and relevant industry experience in the field is often preferable for employers.

Biomedical Engineer

Biomedical Engineers are tasked with analysing and designing solutions to issues within biology and medicine. This can often involve the design of various biomedical systems and products, including artificial body parts and machines for diagnosing medical problems, as well as a number of other duties surrounding biomedical equipment.

As one might expect, you will typically require a bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering in order to become a Biomedical Engineer; however, you may also be able to work within this field if you have a BSc in an alternate area of engineering, coupled with a graduate degree in biomedical engineering or relevant/adequate first-hand experience.

Computer and Information Systems Manager

A highly technical role of much importance within a business, a Computer and Information Systems Manager is tasked with managing an organisation’s computer activity, taking the reins for all the hardware and software decisions of a company.

As this is a managerial position, you may also have to oversee the other IT personnel on staff, as well as being responsible for the company’s network security. For this role, you will typically need to be educated to degree level in Computer and Information Science and have several years of relevant work experience in support of that degree.

So there you have it: if you’re looking to enter the world of science with a career that will last long into the future, these five future jobs in science are well worth aiming for.

View Science Job Listings >

Office Small Talk

Whether you like it or not, small talk is something that everyone engages in from time to time, if only because it's preferable to an awkward silence. But how do people feel about small talk in the office? We conducted a survey of UK employees to see what the general consensus is.

Small Talk in the Office: Survey Results

Interestingly, 81% of those surveyed - a big majority - found small talk in the office to be generally irritating. Does this figure surprise you? Let's take a look at some of the conversation topics that people voted MOST annoying when it comes to office small talk.

  • According to our survey, children and football were the most irritating topics of all.

  • Forced pleasantries, such as wishing colleagues a Happy New Year on the first day back at work, were voted irritating by 29% of respondents.

  • Trash talking one's colleagues was found irritating by 36% of respondents.

  • 23% of those surveyed agreed that conversations about evenings and weekends were annoying.

  • 17% of people don't like talking to their colleagues about the weather.

So why does office small talk persist despite the fact that so many people seem to dislike it?

Well, some find that small talk lessens feelings of awkwardness and makes the working environment feel more relaxed. Others may just enjoy it as a distraction from work!

We think this has been an interesting insight into the opinions of employees when it comes to small talk - do you think the results would be similar in your office?

Want to keep up to date with our latest insights into the world of work? Follow HRS on Twitter, or like us on Facebook!

How Much Do You Know About Office Etiquette? >>

HRS at the 2019 Recruiter Awards

The 2019 Recruiter Awards took place last night (Thursday 9 May) at Grosvenor House in London. This annual awards night is always a highlight of our year, and the Hyper Recruitment Solutions team were there last night alongside many other luminaries from the UK recruitment industry.

The drinks reception and 3-course meal were splendid as expected, but the real high point came during the award ceremony itself, when we learned that we had WON the Recruitment Agency of the Year (11-49 Employees) award!

This is an exceptionally competitive category, so as you can imagine, we were beyond thrilled to be named the winners. Here's what our MD Ricky Martin had to say afterwards:

"It was a fantastic night and certainly one to remember - it was an opportunity for the recruitment industry to celebrate excellence and commitment to talent. I am absolutely delighted that Hyper Recruitment Solutions are now a multi-award winning company. I couldn't be more proud of every member of this incredible, life-changing company."

- Ricky Martin, Managing Director

 

Hyper Recruitment Solutions: Multi-Award Winners!

As Ricky notes above, this is not the first award with which Hyper Recruitment Solutions have been honoured. You may recall that, back in December, we attended the 10th Annual IRP Awards - another highly prestigious event - where we were named Best Company to Work for (Up to 50 Employees)!

Our win at the Recruiter Awards last night is testament to the company's ongoing success and to the unwavering dedication of the HRS team. We have been going from strength to strength for years now, changing lives all over the UK and showing no signs whatsoever of slowing down.

We'd like to say a huge thank you to the Recruiter Awards for their recognition, and to every member of the HRS team who has helped us to become the multi-award winning company we are today.

Would you like to join our award-winning recruitment team? View our current vacancies here, or use the links below to find out more!

About HRS >   Careers at HRS >

Arguing with Colleagues

Lots of people dread going to work in the morning, but this often has nothing to do with the work itself. Even the most tedious tasks can be enjoyable if you're working with people you like, and by the same token, your dream job can quickly turn into a nightmare when you don't get on with your colleagues.

If the people you work with are causing you stress, here are a few tips that can will hopefully make your working life a little bit easier:

Learn about the colleagues you dislike

If you know someone quite well, you are more likely to give them the benefit of the doubt when they do something that annoys you (whereas you may find it hard to tolerate such behaviour from a virtual stranger). Take some time to learn about your colleagues - who they are, what they're like, what makes them tick - and you may find it easier to like them.

Tip: Perhaps that short-tempered colleague of yours has just gone through a bad divorce that has left them exhausted or impatient. Or maybe management recently refused them a promotion. In any case, getting to know your co-workers will help you to understand where they are coming from and could help you learn to like them more.

Never gossip about your colleagues

When a co-worker is stressing you out, it can be tempting to vent your frustration to other colleagues once the offender is out of the room. You may even feel like spreading gossip about the person in the office or lab that you're not particularly fond of, but ask yourself: what good will come from doing this? Will it help build your relationship with them? Will it improve your chances of future promotion? Will it make your department work harder and more efficiently? The answer, of course, is no.

Tip: Instead of potentially making the relationship worse, try to find ways to improve it by being professional and respectful even to the colleagues who get on your nerves. If you do feel the need to say something, say it to the person's face (or make a formal complaint to management if necessary) rather than talking about someone behind their back.

Be the adult

When you were in school, teachers would expect you to be civil to everyone, no matter who they were or what may have happened between you. If you were able to do that as a child, you should have no problem doing it now!

Tip: You don't have to become best friends with the person you dislike - just be polite. Get on with your job, help others where you can, and if at possible, do not respond to childish bad behaviour. You might be surprised to find that professionalism can be very contagious!

Document your conversations

But what if a co-worker is doing more than merely getting on your nerves? Colleagues can sometimes say/do horrible things that make you feel uncomfortable or even unsafe. Words and actions can have a tremendous effect on a person - and it's important to report unacceptable behaviour to management so that it can be dealt with - but it can be hard to prove that someone said or did something if there is no record of it taking place. So what can you do? Make a record!

Tip: If you're having serious issues with a particular individual, try to stop speaking to them face-to-face and instead communicate via email so that every interaction can be documented. They may be more professional when they know that there will be a written record of any transgressions, and if their bad behaviour continues, you'll be able to prove it!

Are you the problem?

It can be hard to admit, but in some cases, dislike for a colleague may be due to that person not having the same bad habits as you. Nobody likes being criticised or told what to do, but before you take action, examine your own behaviour to make sure you're not giving others a valid reason to complain.

Tip: If someone keeps nagging you to complete a particular task, is it because they're impatient, or is it because you consistently let them down? If the latter, changing your own behaviour may trigger a dramatic improvement in the relationship between you and your colleague.

For more news and insights about the world of work, be sure to follow Hyper Recruitment Solutions on Facebook and Twitter!

Read More: Office Etiquette >

'Introvert' was once viewed as something of a dirty word within the recruitment industry and the wider world of work. Introverts (or so went the stereotype) were reclusive, uncooperative, and difficult to work with - not what any employer is looking for in a new recruit.

Luckily, the world has come a long way in recent years, and many character traits that were once wrongly deemed as negatives are now welcomed with open arms - an introverted personality being one of them.

Truth be told, being introverted actually has numerous benefits in the workplace, and an introverted individual can bring with them a number of attributes that are highly sought after by employers in a variety of different sectors.

Jobs for introverts

The benefits of being introverted

Being an introverted person can have a number of hidden advantages. Introverts typically possess excellent creative skills and imaginative ideas, making them a great fit for jobs that require originality, artistic flair, or outside-the-box problem solving.

Meanwhile, introverts are often extremely focused, highly productive workers who are undeterred by the hustle and bustle happening around them. What’s more, introverts tend to choose their words carefully, meaning that - while they may not speak up often - there’s weight to their words when they do.

The innate ability to work independently also promotes impressive organisational skills, which goes hand-in-hand with excellent prioritisation of work. In addition to that, these independent qualities also promote initiative, self-management and responsibility, without the need to over-rely on others.

That being said, it isn’t all plain sailing and there are undoubtedly a few hurdles for any introvert to overcome if they want to succeed in the working world.

Obstacles for the introverted

Unfortunately for introverts, the world of work does also tend to involve a number of situations that are not ideally suited to this type of personality. From the initial interview process to the working environment itself, the necessity for interaction, collaboration and general conversation is quite a departure from the preferred environment of your average introvert.

Open-plan office layouts and team-based activities are just two of the necessary evils that must commonly be confronted. On top of that, team meetings, occasional office socials and even communal dining areas can be uncomfortable settings for introverted people.

But don’t despair just yet, introverts of the world – it’s not all doom and gloom.

Introvert working

Jobs for introverted people

Luckily, there are numerous jobs that lend themselves well to introverted personalities. These range from IT-based roles to more physical jobs and everything in between.

Here are just a few examples from a variety of different sectors:

Graphic Designer

Top of the list of jobs that are ideal for creative introverts is that of the graphic designer. With the majority of the work being carried out solo, the vast majority of your working day will be spent working alone, left to your own devices.

While you may have to run through a brief with a client, manager or team, the design task is ultimately left in your hands. Better still, this also draws on the creativity and imagination commonly associated with introverted personalities, making this job the dream ticket for many introverts.

Best of all, this job can often be done on a freelance basis, allowing you to potentially bypass the office environment altogether and work in the comfort (and seclusion) of your own home.

Accountant

If you have a good head for figures, a job in accountancy could be extremely rewarding – both with regards to job satisfaction and financial reimbursement.

Attention to detail and a focused approach are two vital requirements for this profession; ditto the ability to prioritise and work to deadlines. For introverts that tick those boxes and command a solid knowledge of mathematics, this can be a fantastic career path to follow.

As an accountant, your main priority will be to analyse economic data, crunch numbers, and produce financial reports for clients and businesses, ultimately ensuring that they’re operating efficiently, legally and on-budget. Accountancy jobs offer a wealth of opportunities to progress, and there’s often the flexibility to work remotely as well.

Lab Technician

If you have a keen interest in healthcare but are put off by the idea of dealing with patients and the general public, a great way into the industry is via the laboratory door. If you get a job as a lab technician, you can expect to carry out routine technical tasks, sample testing and experiments, along with data analysis and risk assessment.

Depending on the field you're in, the role itself may be clinic-based or focused around research and development. You may find yourself working independently or under the direction of a more experienced professional - either way, expect a high degree of independence. A keen eye for detail and the ability to work well unsupervised are great assets to have as a lab tech, two attributes that many introverts have in droves.

Web Developer

For the computer-savvy introvert, web development can be a lucrative and logical direction to go in. As a web developer, you will primarily be tasked with designing, coding and modifying websites to meet your client's wishes.

While this is a position that can be done outside of an office environment, there are lots of in-house web developer roles as well; as such, you may be based within a team of other specialists. Nevertheless, it’s not unusual for a web developer to find themselves honed in on a job or project for hours at a time, meticulously programming away with no time to stop and chat.

As with many IT jobs, this can require a lot of independent working, left to your own devices to focus on getting the visual appearance and technical performance is up to scratch. If you see yourself as a focused, analytical introvert with sound IT knowledge, a career in web development could be a match made in heaven.

Writer

The job of a writer is an ideal one for introverts who are well-versed in the written word and have a creative flair for language. Best of all, writing jobs can come in many different guises, from the formal, straight-laced style of a technical writer to the more conversational, down-to-earth approach of a full-time blogger.

Meanwhile, writing also has the potential for good career progression as a self-employed solo venture or within a wider team, with editorial positions a logical next step. What’s more, the role of a writer also lends itself perfectly to freelance work and can be done just as easily - if not more so - when working remotely.

So, there you have it – proof that introversion doesn’t mean you have to be cut off from the outside world, banished to a secluded dungeon and forced to work alone by candlelight!

Here are some other useful links for introverts, particularly those who are seeking a career in the science or technology industries:

Interview Tips for Introverts >   Browse Science Jobs >