Have you ever wondered what it's like to work at Hyper Recruitment Solutions? Well, we got the inside scoop from one of our life changers to show you exactly what a typical day in her life looks like!

Meet Georgia (Our Consultant of the Year 2019)!

Georgia is a Recruitment Consultant at Hyper Recruitment Solutions and was awarded the consultant of the year title last year (well done Georgia!). We caught up with Georgia to find out what a typical day at work looks like...

One of my main roles as a life changer at HRS is to manage the recruitment process and communicate with candidates from start to finish, so my day typically begins with some important phone calls and emails.

I might be scheduling interviews for one candidate, helping another candidate prepare for an upcoming interview, and giving feedback from a hiring manager to another. Communicating with my candidates regularly helps me to maintain knowledgable and make sure that they find the perfect job!

When I'm not speaking to candidates, you might find me catching up with hiring managers and business leaders. Staying in touch with them (even when they're not actively hiring for a role) helps me keep ahead of the market. My clients often let me know whenever a new role opens up so we can start assisting them in the hiring process right away.

A lot of my clients work in really interesting and technical industries including; biotechnology, engineering, cell & gene therapy and more! I love getting the inside scoop on the up and coming positions for our candidates. 

My role isn't all office based - in fact, I spend a lot of time out and about attending meetings with clients. This is a really great way for me to better understand their business needs and gives me a chance to learn all about the roles they're offering.

I often leave client meetings feeling like a subject expert in their field, which is really important when it comes to finding the right person for the company. Alongside meeting clients, I also regularly meet with potential candidates to better understand their job expectations and to really humanise the recruitment process. 

I love my job because it combines my own scientific knowledge with my drive to better people's lives - helping me place people in their dream jobs time and time again! 

Take a Look Around the HRS Workspace

Walking around the gorgeous contemporary HRS office gives you a real sense of why our life-changers love doing what they do! We've set them up with a vibrant, contemporary space that allows them to work to their best ability at all times. Our life-changers are able to socialise and relax when they're not busy working with candidates and hiring managers to make employment dreams come true! 

We asked one of our Senior Recruitment Consultants, Chris, what he thinks of the new offices: "When you come into work here at HRS, the first thing that hits you is energy! The space is bright, exciting, everything looks so inviting and you just want to get to work to make a difference."

The new offices are fitted with all kinds of fun and interactive spaces to bring the place to life. Here are a few photos to give you a better idea of the finished look:

A football table - perfect for a bit of friendly competition between our recruiters!

The office is adorned with inspirational artwork, reminding our life-changers why they're here!

Would you like to get involved with the work we do here at HRS? We are currently looking for new recruiters to join our HRS teams up and down the country. You can see the roles we currently have on offer by clicking the button below. 

Careers at HRS >

London city skyline

A career in the field of science can be interesting, exciting and rewarding; however, finding a job that fits your scientific expertise can be a clinical trial in itself.

Specialist science jobs are just that - specialist - and are naturally less commonly available than a less specific role.

As a result, finding a science job that suits your specific competencies may require a broader net. A wider search radius can open you up to a whole new world of opportunities.

To help you map out your search with a little direction, we've compiled a shortlist of the best cities for science jobs in the UK.

 

London

Top of the list should come as no surprise to anyone - it is, or course, the UK's biggest city, London. England's capital boasts over 27,000 life science employees in total, making it a key location for science jobs and a regular #1 in global science job cities.

Home to three of the world's Top 10 Bioscience Universities, London also plays host to over 900 life science companies, including the Francis Crick Institute and the Medicines & Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency.

Browse Science Jobs in London

 

Manchester

With over 150k life science students and the two foremost NHS trusts for clinical trials in the UK, Manchester is a key city for those seeking employment in the science sector.

Much like London, Manchester is a thriving hotspot for science jobs in the UK. Manchester is home to a number of notable science institutions, including Citylabs and Manchester Science Park.

Browse Science Jobs in Manchester

 

Edinburgh

Scotland's thriving life sciences sector employs over 37,000 people within 700 organisations. Following the lead of London and Manchester, Edinburgh is Scotland's epicentre for scientific employment.

The Edinburgh BioQuarter markets itself as a hub for life science innovators, with over 25 leading life sciences companies from across the globe. Benefitting from a strong evolving investment environment, it also boasts Europe's largest concentration of stem cell scientists.

Browse Science Jobs in Edinburgh

 

Oxford

According to Times Higher Education's World University Rankings, Oxford is home to the best university in the world. Needless to say, Oxford is not short on academic excellence and a key location for scientific research.

The Oxford Science Park is one of the most influential science, technology and business environments in the UK. Hosting over 90 science companies, from start-ups to multinationals, this state-of-the-art facility houses more than 2500 people and some of the UK's highest potential and most exciting companies

Browse Science Jobs in Oxford

 

Cambridge

Hot on the heels of Oxford's top spot in THE's World University Rankings is #3 on that list, Cambridge. A city that prides itself on its scholarly prowess, Cambridge is a notable site for scientific innovation and a logical location for those seeking jobs in the science sector.

And home to Cambridge Science Park. The oldest science park in the UK, Cambridge Science Park is a hub for science and technology, hosting over 7500 employees from over 100 companies, including the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Browse Science Jobs in Cambridge

 

Best Cities in the World for Science Jobs

The world of science has endless possibilities in terms of scope for innovation and breakthrough. As such, why limit your search for the best science jobs strictly to the shores of the UK?

If you're thinking of taking your search for science jobs international, America is a fantastic destination to consider. The United States is the most prolific publisher of high-quality science in the world and life sciences account for just under 50% of the nation's output in the natural sciences.

San Francisco Bay's Silicon Valley is particularly renowned for its high-paying jobs in high-tech fields and the science sector and offers with some of the most attractive science jobs on the globe.

Meanwhile, the famed “Research Triangle” of Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill is known globally as a staple of technology and research. The area consistently ranks within the top three US region for life science companies and is home to giants such as GlaxoSmithKline and Biogen.

 

For more information on the best cities for science jobs in the UK and beyond, why not drop us a line today? Call now on (0)203 910 2980 or get in touch online by clicking the button below.

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Money

With the new year upon us, many people around the UK will begin making their resolutions for the year ahead. For those with professional aspirations, top of that list will often be securing a pay rise.

Although talking money can be an awkward and uncomfortable process at times, it can be an extremely important and vital part of professional life - particularly when it comes being paid what you're worth.

That being said, identifying exactly how much you are worth isn't always a straightforward process. It's not unusual for employers to want to pay you as little as possible to maximise profits, so they aren't always going to be forthcoming if you are in fact being underpaid.

As such, it's important to be able to recognise this fact for yourself. Luckily, this blog aims to help you do exactly that.

 

Look Around

Perhaps the easiest way of determining whether or not you are being underpaid what you or your position are worth is to simply have a scope around the jobs market and note the typical salaries on offer.

If you search for roles similar to your own, you'll soon be able to gain insight into what the going rate is for a position of your skill level and responsibility. However, it's worth remembering that this method isn't an exact science.

Chances are, there will likely be some form of a discrepancy between your duties and the standard roles listed on job boards and recruitment sites, particularly if you have been in your role for some time and have taken on additional responsibilities along the way.

If this is indeed the case, knowing whether or not you are being paid what you are worth isn't always straight-forward. Luckily, there's an easy way to help identify your eligibility and determine once and for all if you are due a raise…

 

Look Inside

Perhaps the most effective way to gauge whether or not you deserve a pay rise is to take a good hard look at yourself… by placing your own professional skills and personality under the microscope!

An honest and candid approach to appraising the man in the mirror is a fantastic way to uncovering the truth about where you stand in the company pecking order and whether or not you are being paid what's due.

To help you formulate your introspective self-assessment, here are four fundamental questions you may want to ask yourself before you head into your boss's office with an axe to grind and a cross to bear.

 

Are your skills indispensable?

Any worker that is a vital part of the overall machine and a key ingredient in the processes that make the company work can count themselves lucky.

If you hold a skill set that is unlike anyone else's, you have yourself a fundamental USP that is totally individual and specific to you as a person.

Whether you're a salesman with ironclad client relationships established through years of rapport or a creative with your own quirky style that cannot be easily replicated, such skills can be essential to company operations.

However, you don't need to be the best in your field to be seen as indispensable. As is often the case in the working world, experience is seen as a big plus point and tenure can also translate to indispensability.

As the old saying goes, you can't teach experience and anyone that has a storied history with the company and the insider knowledge that goes with it has themselves a solid argument. Long-standing tenure can provide abilities that cannot be taught.

 

Have your contributions made a difference?

Tangible contributions can be one of the strongest arguments in the arsenal of anyone looking to make a valid claim for a pay rise - particularly if they are backed by corresponding facts and figures.

If you have brought in substantial business and were the primary reason for such a deal getting finalised, you will likely have a large bargaining chip to play with.

For example, a salesman with a salary of £25k/annum that brings in £75k of sales will have theoretically paid for his salary three times over, which makes for a solid statistic when it comes to requesting a pay rise.

That being said, contributions don't always need to be measured in pounds and pennies. Your contributions could simply be your continued hard work and ability to help a project reach completion on time and above expectations.

Providing a consistently high level of output and performance can be the best contribution of all and is applicable to virtually any job and department.

 

Are you a positive influence on the company?

In addition to making positive contributions to the bottom line and the business as a whole, being a positive influence on others within the office environment can also be a big contributing factor to your company worth.

Office morale can have a big influence on overall performance and its widely believed that, as a rule, a happy worker is a productive worker. If you are in a position of managerial responsibility and maintain a positive work ethic and upbeat environment within your team, such an influence should be recognised.

While it may not be the overriding factor that swings it in your favour, being a positive influence on the team and those around you can be a great supplementary quality to reinforce your argument and support your case for a pay rise.

 

Are you a key part in the company's future plans?

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, determining whether or not you are a fundamental part of the machine going forward could be your most valid reason of all.

If your presence within the company is vital for the business to achieve its goals in the future, your value within the organisation should be rewarded with the appropriate remuneration.

For example, if the primary project of the year is to be spearheaded, managed or set up by you, it's fair to say that you are a pretty big part of the company's future plans. Highlight this importance to hammer home your worth and underline your standing in the company.

For more details on salaries and pay rises, why not check out our How to Ask for a Raise blog?

Similarly, you might also be interested in reading our blog on How to Get Promoted.

stress in the workplace

Working life in the 21st century can be extremely stressful. Anyone within a position of responsibility can tell you that with ironclad sincerity.

However, this isn't a trait reserved only for high-ranking management roles; even call centre staff and admin workers can feel the heat from time to time and the cloud of stress doesn't discriminate.

As an employer, knowing how to manage this workplace stress can be a key factor in the health of your team and, ultimately, the success of your business.

This blog aims to help you shake those stresses and maintain a harmonious blossoming environment within your office walls.

 

How to Create a Less Stressful Work Environment

While it would be easy for anyone to suggest offering private healthcare and higher salaries as a means of reducing stress in your workplace, realistically this simply isn't a financially viable option for many small/medium-sized businesses.

That being said, that doesn't mean your hands are completely tied. There are still a few tried and tested techniques that can have a positive impact on workplace anxiety without dramatically shaving your profits.

If you're truly serious about reducing stress in the workplace, actions speak louder than words. Alter your approach to the working environment by following these three simple steps and reduce stress in the workplace instantly.

 

Flexibility

Work/life balance is an increasingly important subject when it comes to anxiety in the workplace. If one side of that equation falls by the wayside, it can very quickly affect the other.

A great way to combat this element is to introduce flexible working arrangements, such as working from home days and flexi-time.

Situations will inevitably arise that require workers to leave early or arrive late, whether it's traffic, medical appointments or childcare restrictions. If strict 9-5 attendance is enforced, this can naturally become extremely stressful.

Racing to work every morning is a common activity for a lot of workers and can be a huge stress factor for many, particularly if childcare arrangements dictate when they can leave the house.

Taking a more relaxed approach to how the weekly hours are made up can allow employees to better organise their lives outside the office, which will ultimately result in a better, more productive atmosphere inside it.

 

Office Mobility

Staying mobile in a sedentary office environment can be difficult, particularly if hard deadlines are looming and work needs to be done on a strict timescale.

That being said, being sat at your desk staring into a box for eight hours is not good either and can have a notable knock-on effect on the quality of output and, as a result, stress levels.

Encourage employees to leave their desks periodically throughout the day to help them retain their focus and avoid burnout. The "Sit 60/Move 3" rule is an easy rule to implement, promoting three minutes of motion every hour.

Similarly, extended exposure to screen glare can also negatively impact eye health. Applying a comparable approach to optical health can also have a positive effect on the quality of work.

Opticians and eye specialists commonly recommend the 20-20-20 technique, whereby you spend 20 seconds every 20 minutes looking at something 20 feet away.

 

Promoting Health

Even if you take a hard-nosed approach that completely takes empathy out of the equation, it's worth remembering that stress contributes greatly to health and a sickly worker will inevitably translate to an absent worker, which benefits no-one.

The last thing you want is to have the demands of the job impact the health of your employees. As such, actively promoting health and well-being within the office is a great way to help ensure your workers stay fighting fit and good to go.

Offering healthy perks for your staff – such as free fruit – can have a huge upside for relatively little cost, while office support groups can provide a low-cost outlet for mental stress as well.

In addition to providing healthy options for your staff, these simple implementations also show that you and your company care about employee morale and welfare, which can be just as important in itself.

 

For more tips on how to create a less stressful work environment, why not drop us a line today? Call now on 0203 225 5120 or get in touch online using the button below.

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The global recruitment industry is worth more than £300 billion - no wonder so many people want to become recruitment consultants!

But what does a recruitment consultant actually do? And what does it take to become one? Obviously, we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions know everything there is to know about this field, so let's answer those two questions now.

Overview

A recruitment consultant's main role is to match suitable candidates to temporary or permanent positions within client organisations. Recruitment consultants work hard to build positive relationships with companies in order to develop a deep understanding of their hiring needs - this helps us to find the right candidates to fill our clients' vacancies.

After identifying the right candidate for a role, the recruiter will conduct interviews, perform background checks, and ensure that both candidate and employer are a good fit for one another. Recruitment consultants also provide advice to both parties regarding training, salary, and career progression.

Responsibilities

As a recruitment consultant, you act as the crucial link between client companies and potential candidates. A recruiter's responsibilities are therefore varied and challenging. Here are just a few of them:

  • Using various marketing, networking, and business development techniques to attract attention from client companies

  • Identifying and approaching potential candidates

  • Preparing correspondence and documents (such as CVs and references) to send to clients

  • Meeting targets related to the number of candidates placed in suitable roles

  • Revising recruitment practices to ensure effectiveness in selection techniques and recruitment programmes

Qualifications

Recruitment consultancy roles are often available to all graduates, regardless of subject area (although of course it helps if your degree matches the area in which you would like to recruit - e.g. a science degree may make you more attractive to scientific recruitment agencies).

Rather than looking for specific qualifications or achievements, employers within the recruitment industry tend to use personal ability, skill, and charisma as measures of suitability.

Skills & Abilities

A good recruitment consultant should possess the following skills:

  • Creativity
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Sales and negotiation skills
  • Ability to meet targets / deadlines
  • Excellent communication / people skills
  • Exceptional time management
  • Drive and determination

Salary & Working Environment

The average salary for a recruitment consultant is in the range of £22,000 to £28,000 a year, although those in senior positions can earn in excess of £40k per year. Many employers offer some sort of performance-related bonus (even for inexperienced employees) on top of a basic pay package - these bonuses can be set on an individual, team or company-wide basis. A number of other benefits - such as mobile devices, laptops, company cars, social events, and end-of-year rewards - may also be available.

A recruitment consultant's typical working day usually runs from 9am to 5pm, although overtime is not unusual. It is possible to work as a freelance recruitment consultant, but generally not without expert knowledge of a specific field.

Flexible working and career breaks are available within this industry, but are uncommon as a result of the role's very active nature. Work is often based within an office setting, but travelling and outside work are common as a result of regular interviews and meetings.

Would you like to work for Hyper Recruitment Solutions? Use the link below to find out how!

Careers at HRS >