stress in the workplace

Working life in the 21st century can be extremely stressful. Anyone within a position of responsibility can tell you that with ironclad sincerity.

However, this isn't a trait reserved only for high-ranking management roles; even call centre staff and admin workers can feel the heat from time to time and the cloud of stress doesn't discriminate.

As an employer, knowing how to manage this workplace stress can be a key factor in the health of your team and, ultimately, the success of your business.

This blog aims to help you shake those stresses and maintain a harmonious blossoming environment within your office walls.

 

How to Create a Less Stressful Work Environment

While it would be easy for anyone to suggest offering private healthcare and higher salaries as a means of reducing stress in your workplace, realistically this simply isn't a financially viable option for many small/medium-sized businesses.

That being said, that doesn't mean your hands are completely tied. There are still a few tried and tested techniques that can have a positive impact on workplace anxiety without dramatically shaving your profits.

If you're truly serious about reducing stress in the workplace, actions speak louder than words. Alter your approach to the working environment by following these three simple steps and reduce stress in the workplace instantly.

 

Flexibility

Work/life balance is an increasingly important subject when it comes to anxiety in the workplace. If one side of that equation falls by the wayside, it can very quickly affect the other.

A great way to combat this element is to introduce flexible working arrangements, such as working from home days and flexi-time.

Situations will inevitably arise that require workers to leave early or arrive late, whether it's traffic, medical appointments or childcare restrictions. If strict 9-5 attendance is enforced, this can naturally become extremely stressful.

Racing to work every morning is a common activity for a lot of workers and can be a huge stress factor for many, particularly if childcare arrangements dictate when they can leave the house.

Taking a more relaxed approach to how the weekly hours are made up can allow employees to better organise their lives outside the office, which will ultimately result in a better, more productive atmosphere inside it.

 

Office Mobility

Staying mobile in a sedentary office environment can be difficult, particularly if hard deadlines are looming and work needs to be done on a strict timescale.

That being said, being sat at your desk staring into a box for eight hours is not good either and can have a notable knock-on effect on the quality of output and, as a result, stress levels.

Encourage employees to leave their desks periodically throughout the day to help them retain their focus and avoid burnout. The "Sit 60/Move 3" rule is an easy rule to implement, promoting three minutes of motion every hour.

Similarly, extended exposure to screen glare can also negatively impact eye health. Applying a comparable approach to optical health can also have a positive effect on the quality of work.

Opticians and eye specialists commonly recommend the 20-20-20 technique, whereby you spend 20 seconds every 20 minutes looking at something 20 feet away.

 

Promoting Health

Even if you take a hard-nosed approach that completely takes empathy out of the equation, it's worth remembering that stress contributes greatly to health and a sickly worker will inevitably translate to an absent worker, which benefits no-one.

The last thing you want is to have the demands of the job impact the health of your employees. As such, actively promoting health and well-being within the office is a great way to help ensure your workers stay fighting fit and good to go.

Offering healthy perks for your staff – such as free fruit – can have a huge upside for relatively little cost, while office support groups can provide a low-cost outlet for mental stress as well.

In addition to providing healthy options for your staff, these simple implementations also show that you and your company care about employee morale and welfare, which can be just as important in itself.

 

For more tips on how to create a less stressful work environment, why not drop us a line today? Call now on 0203 225 5120 or get in touch online using the button below.

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The global recruitment industry is worth more than £300 billion - no wonder so many people want to become recruitment consultants!

But what does a recruitment consultant actually do? And what does it take to become one? Obviously, we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions know everything there is to know about this field, so let's answer those two questions now.

Overview

A recruitment consultant's main role is to match suitable candidates to temporary or permanent positions within client organisations. Recruitment consultants work hard to build positive relationships with companies in order to develop a deep understanding of their hiring needs - this helps us to find the right candidates to fill our clients' vacancies.

After identifying the right candidate for a role, the recruiter will conduct interviews, perform background checks, and ensure that both candidate and employer are a good fit for one another. Recruitment consultants also provide advice to both parties regarding training, salary, and career progression.

Responsibilities

As a recruitment consultant, you act as the crucial link between client companies and potential candidates. A recruiter's responsibilities are therefore varied and challenging. Here are just a few of them:

  • Using various marketing, networking, and business development techniques to attract attention from client companies

  • Identifying and approaching potential candidates

  • Preparing correspondence and documents (such as CVs and references) to send to clients

  • Meeting targets related to the number of candidates placed in suitable roles

  • Revising recruitment practices to ensure effectiveness in selection techniques and recruitment programmes

Qualifications

Recruitment consultancy roles are often available to all graduates, regardless of subject area (although of course it helps if your degree matches the area in which you would like to recruit - e.g. a science degree may make you more attractive to scientific recruitment agencies).

Rather than looking for specific qualifications or achievements, employers within the recruitment industry tend to use personal ability, skill, and charisma as measures of suitability.

Skills & Abilities

A good recruitment consultant should possess the following skills:

  • Creativity
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Sales and negotiation skills
  • Ability to meet targets / deadlines
  • Excellent communication / people skills
  • Exceptional time management
  • Drive and determination

Salary & Working Environment

The average salary for a recruitment consultant is in the range of £22,000 to £28,000 a year, although those in senior positions can earn in excess of £40k per year. Many employers offer some sort of performance-related bonus (even for inexperienced employees) on top of a basic pay package - these bonuses can be set on an individual, team or company-wide basis. A number of other benefits - such as mobile devices, laptops, company cars, social events, and end-of-year rewards - may also be available.

A recruitment consultant's typical working day usually runs from 9am to 5pm, although overtime is not unusual. It is possible to work as a freelance recruitment consultant, but generally not without expert knowledge of a specific field.

Flexible working and career breaks are available within this industry, but are uncommon as a result of the role's very active nature. Work is often based within an office setting, but travelling and outside work are common as a result of regular interviews and meetings.

Would you like to work for Hyper Recruitment Solutions? Use the link below to find out how!

Careers at HRS >

Finding a Job Overseas

Are you thinking about working abroad? There are lots of reasons to move to another country, but regardless of why you're relocating, you'll probably need to find a job when you get there.

Here are some important things to consider when you're trying to find a job overseas:

Where do you want to go?

If you know which country you'd like to work in, you should begin your job hunt by gauging what sort of jobs are available in that territory. Lots of recruitment agencies (including Hyper Recruitment Solutions) feature both local and international job listings, so these companies' websites can be a good place to start.

Do you need a visa?

It's important to know whether you are eligible to work in your chosen country. Generally speaking, UK citizens will need a visa to work in non-EU countries, but you shouldn't need one to work within other EU member states (note that this may change depending on how Brexit negotiations progress).

You will need to have a rough idea of how long you intend to stay in your chosen country, as this may affect the type and volume of paperwork you have to complete.

Localise your CV

Once you've got an idea of the work that's available and the documentation you'll need to work in your chosen country, you can begin to investigate the local employment protocol. This might require you to adjust your CV - in some places you will be expected to include a picture, while others may require you to disclose your age, etc.

Other challenges you might face:

  • Language Barrier - Be prepared to stumble through some awkward conversations if you're not fluent in your new home's primary language.

  • Homesickness - It's normal to miss home after relocating, but don't worry. You'll meet lots of new and interesting friends before you know it!

Working abroad can be an invaluable asset to your career - it builds confidence, and you'll experience things that you never would have encountered at home. Browse HRS job listings and apply online >

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Scientist Quiz

Nearly 7,000 people (and counting!) have taken Hyper Recruitment Solutions' What Type of Scientist Are You? quiz since we launched it earlier this year.

And who knows? Maybe we inspired some of those individuals to consider a career that had never even occurred to them before! For instance, have you ever thought about how your innate problem-solving skills might serve you well as a data scientist? Or how your love of animals might translate into a rewarding career in zoology?

If not, be sure to take the quiz yourself before you read on to find out what results everyone else has been getting!

The Most Popular Results

Science Quiz Results - Graph

As you can see, there's been a lot of variety in the results that people have been getting from our quiz - some people are clinical scientists, some are ecologists, and some are better suited to biochemistry.

The 3 most popular results are:

  1. Geologist (14.4% of people get this result)
  2. Astronomer (13.9% of people get this result)
  3. Physicist (13.4% of people get this result)

This suggests that there are a lot of people out there with analytical minds and a great love for going outdoors - these are qualities that mesh very well with a career in geology!

We've also seen a lot of people show an interest in unlocking the really big mysteries, like whether we're alone in the universe and indeed where the universe came from in the first place. These people would make great astronomers and physicians - the second and third most popular quiz results respectively.

The least popular result was Biologist - just 4.6% of our quiz-takers are best suited to a career in biology, but that's still more than 300 people!

Take the Quiz >   Browse Science Jobs >

The CRO / CMO industry has grown a lot in recent years. If you're looking to start a career in this sector, we at HRS can help you - view our CRO / CMO jobs here, or read on to learn all about the CRO and CMO industry and why it's flourishing right now.

Contract Research Organisations (CRO)

A contract research organisation is an organisation that is contracted by another firm (usually within the biotechnological, medical device and pharmaceutical industries) to provide outsourced research services.

CROs are popular because they offer a more cost-effective solution for firms seeking to produce new medicines for large and niche markets alike. By outsourcing research to CROs, the costs of conducting a trial are reduced massively as the firm will not need the infrastructure, space or manpower to run trials or conduct research themselves. Before CROs became an established method of pursuing approval for a drug, many companies would only take action when there was a sense of guaranteed approval for large markets.

This has made research into new medicines a much more feasible and affordable prospect for the average firm, reducing their general overhead costs. CROs provide a comprehensive range of services, including:

  • Clinical trial data management
  • Quality and metric reporting
  • Data entry and validation
  • Full project management

The fast growth of the CRO industry is evidence of the drastically changing pharmaceutical sector and how companies are adapting their methods to meet the ever-changing needs and demands of shareholders and society.

Contract Research Organisations

Contract Manufacturing Organisation (CMO)

A contract manufacturing organisation also serves other firms within the pharmaceutical industry on a contractual basis, but instead of providing research services, CMOs offer comprehensive drug development and manufacturing services.

Again, this assists the hiring company with scalability and allows them to focus on more important areas of their business, such as research or marketing. Alternatively, pharmaceutical firms may outsource drug manufacturing work to a CMO if they lack the expertise or facilities required to produce the quantity and/or form of a drug that is needed to perform pre-clinical and clinical trials.

The demand for the services that CMOs offer has resulted in fast growth for the CMO industry over the last decade, and this will continue as the need for CMOs increases. There are several promising trends within the CMO industry that are likely to accelerate further growth in the near future, including:

  • Flexible manufacturing plants – CMOs can invest in flexible manufacturing facilities that are designed to accommodate the changing needs of the pharmaceutical firms they cater for.

  • Cytotoxics – Cytotoxics is an area that has not received much attention but provides an opportunity for significant growth for the CMO industry due to the implications for cancer treatment.

  • Automation – The rise of automation within the CMO industry will see a reduction in the need for continuous checking of verification labour, ensuring consistency and reliability and increasing productivity levels.

CRO CMO Industry

Here at HRS, we have expertise and experience in both CRO and CMO industries, so if you’re interested in working in either of these sectors, we can help you!

View current CRO/CMO vacancies >

Contact Hyper Recruitment Solutions >