Having a job offer in your hand is an exciting moment to say the least. You’ve worked so long and hard to get it, and now, you’re in a position of what may feel like relatively rare control in your hunt for a lucrative and rewarding science role.

So, do you simply accept the offer?

Not necessarily. While the graduate job market undoubtedly remains an intensely competitive one – a recent report by The Telegraph suggesting there are still 39 applications for every graduate job – there are still some things that you should consider at this stage if you are to avoid making a decision you’ll regret.

Take a few deep breaths

Despite what may be your great eagerness for the role that may tempt you to accept the job offer by phone as soon as it is communicated to you, it’s highly recommended to get the offer in writing, not least so that you can examine the entire offer and all of its terms.

As with anything else that involves signing on a dotted line, it’s vital to know what you are committing to, which is why it’s also a good idea – if possible – to have a trusted advisor read the offer and give their opinion and guidance.

As alluded to above, this is an unusual stage of the job search process at which you really do have full control. Furthermore, the more professional and considered your response is to this job offer, the better it will reflect on you from the perspective of both your present and potential employer.  

Now could be a good time to negotiate

Sometimes, a job offer may not match your expectations – or you may have several offers from which to choose. You may therefore be in a position to negotiate that you will hardly ever encounter again in your career.

When contemplating and preparing a counter-offer, you should consider a wide range of factors relating to the offer presently in your hand, from the annual salary or hourly rate, right through to location, holiday time, training opportunities and whether you will be given a company car.

Naturally, your exact list of considerations will depend on the exact position and responsibilities and your personal priorities. The University of Brighton Careers Service has a useful and comprehensive guide to what else you should think about when evaluating a job offer.

Take care in your transition from your old role

As intimidating as it might be to approach your boss and tell them that you are leaving, this is a crucial professional courtesy to provide to your present employer.

It is certainly in your interests to make the transition as smooth and as amicable as possible, not just because of the potential implications for your professional reputation, but also because you can never guarantee that you won’t one day work for the same manager again.  

Once the formalities of notifying your present employer have been dealt with, it’s a good idea to send your new manager and HR manager a ‘thank you’ note and attend your new workplace in person as soon as possible. This will help to show your enthusiasm and eagerness to get started in the new role.

Finally, don’t forget to inform any other potential employers that have presented you with an offer of your decision, so that they can know at the earliest stage you have ruled yourself out of consideration.

Could our high-level know-how in such specialised science fields as biotechnology, pharmacology and CRO/CMO make all of the difference when you are on the lookout for the perfect role? Contact Hyper Recruitment Solutions today to learn more about our full suite of services as a science recruitment agency.  

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