The CV has been said to be dying – or at least nearing its end – on more than a few occasions in the past. Just look at reports from the likes of the Daily Mail that candidates are increasingly replacing their CVs with ‘MeVies’ – footage of themselves designed to catch an employer’s eye – or statistics shared by Dr Tim Sparkes for People Management indicating that only one in 10 Millennials provided a digital CV at their last interview

Nor is it a surprise that people might come to such conclusions. After all, we are seemingly living in a more ‘connected’ world than ever. Why do you still need such an outdated or cumbersome thing as a CV, when you can simply text or email a prospective employer, perhaps directing them towards your LinkedIn profile? 

Well, for one thing, many potential employers will still end an online conversation with you by asking you to send them your CV. As much as they might appreciate you telling them everything about yourself that makes you such a great candidate for their vacancy or company, they still usually like to have something simple and concise to glance back at – and nothing fulfils that role quite as well as a CV.

A digital profile isn’t the answer to everything

There are a few other reasons why online profiles and portfolios haven’t completely replaced the CV as yet. For example, while you could theoretically alter your LinkedIn profile to target only the latest vacancy for which you happen to be applying, it would be quite a hassle to have to do so every single time you contacted a company about a role.

A CV, by contrast, can be tweaked and tailored so that at any one time, you can have several alternate versions from which to choose, depending on the latest employer or sector that you are targeting. You can emphasise certain skills and experiences while de-emphasising others, and the prospective employer will still see that same information and layout whenever they look back at it.

By contrast, you can’t control exactly who, and from exactly what industry, is looking over your LinkedIn or other online profile at any one time. That’s not to suggest that your LinkedIn profile doesn’t have its own invaluable role, not least as it is capable of containing information that you might not be able to fit onto a two-page CV.

However, a polished CV remains a crucial part of your armoury when you come to market yourself to employers. This is why, here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we furnish our candidates with all of the advice they need to refine and tailor their CV for science jobs.

CVs remain a key part of your wider branding package

It’s impossible to say exactly what will happen to the CV in the years to come – many theories have been proposed about its likely fate, and many new and ongoing trends cited.

What is clear, though, is that right now, the CV continues to play a crucial role in candidates’ dealings with science recruitment agencies and employers. It’s a portable and easy-to-refer-to part of your wider branding package that should also include the likes of online profiles and portfolios and cover letters.

Whether you are looking for a job in biotechnology, pharmacology, the environment or any of a wide range of science sectors, here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we will help you to make your own CV as relevant and impactful as possible. Simply contact our team today to learn more

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