Many scientific jobs are based in laboratories, and even if you've experienced a lab environment in school or university, you might well wonder what it's like to actually work in a lab.

Working in a lab

Here are some of the best and worst things about working in a lab:

 

Lab equipment is expensive and delicate

In case you didn't already know, laboratory equipment tends to be pretty expensive. If you happen to be a bit on the clumsy side, you may find yourself racking up quite the replacement bill if you're not careful. Most science work requires concentration and precision, so take it easy if around the most delicate equipment if these aren't your strong points.

 

Your social life may have to take a back seat

When working in a lab, you commit yourself to the experiments you take on. Unfortunately, this can mean that your working hours become somewhat irregular, and other social activities have to be put on hold. Be prepared for your work schedule to be a bit changeable!

 

Your work can be dangerous

When you talk to your friends who maybe work within the construction industry or in factories, you may hear them say how dangerous their line of work is and how they could have an accident at any given time. When you work in a lab, the same thing applies to you! Working with infectious agents, caustic chemicals and electrified apparatus can put your health and safety in major danger, so be careful!

 

You actually have to dress like a scientist

You've most likely seen a load of lab work in movies or on TV, where the workers are dressed in long white coats with huge safety goggles protecting their faces. This is surprisingly true to real life - lab coats and goggles are part of the uniform, primarily because of the health and safety concerns mentioned above.

If you're looking for lab-based work, Hyper Recruitment Solutions can help you! Click the link below to browse the latest scientific from all over the UK!

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Science jobs for students

Are you studying for some sort of science degree at the moment?

We know how hard it can be to find a job while you're a student (and immediately after you graduate), so in this blog, we'll talk you through some different science student job options that you might want to consider pursuing.

While you study

As a science student, there are lots of job opportunities you can take advantage of in tandem with your studies. Some of the best science student jobs include:

  • Internships

  • Volunteering at your university

  • A year in industry

There are lots of scientific companies - including engineering companies, science journals, research departments and more - who offer both paid and unpaid job opportunities to students. Even if these vacancies aren't advertised online, it's always worth enquiring!

You'll have to choose whether to work alongside your studies during term time or for longer periods over the summer holidays. Think carefully about how much time you need to dedicate to your studies and work from there. You don't want to let your studies suffer, no matter how beneficial work experience might be!

Whatever student job you choose to pursue will look great on your CV in the long term. Dedicating your spare time to a science job not only shows that you're enthusiastic about your chosen field, it also shows a willingness to work and an ability to organise your time that other students may not demonstrate during their studies.

How can HRS help?

Here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we offer a comprehensive science recruitment service that is ideal for science students who have recently graduated from university. We can help you to find and apply for a science job with ease - use the links below to browse our latest vacancies or read more about what we have to offer science graduates!

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Women in Science

The International Day of Women and Girls in Science, which takes place on the 11th of February every year, was created by the United Nations as part of the ongoing effort to address gender imbalance in core STEM subjects and promote the participation of women in scientific roles.

The Statistics

Across 14 different countries, the percentage of women graduating from universities with degrees in science-related subjects are as follows:

  • Bachelor's Degree: 18%
  • Master's Degree: 8%
  • PhD: 2%

These low figures are quite disheartening, as are reports that under 30% of scientific research and development roles are currently held by women.

The UN's International Day of Women and Girls in Science aims to encourage women and young girls to pursue an education or career in science and dramatically raise the above percentages.

Breaking Gender Stereotypes

To mark the occasion, we'd like to take a look at just some of the many prolific female scientists who have done vital work throughout history and helped to pave the way for gender equality in scientific fields:

Lise Meitner (1878-1968)

Lise Meitner was an Austrian-Swedish physicist who specialised in radioactivity and nuclear physics. Together with a select group of other scientists, she discovered nuclear fission of uranium - the basic principle of the nuclear weapons that were to follow.

Grace Hopper (1906-1992)

Grace Hopper was an American computer scientist. She was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark 1 computer, and she developed an early variation of the programming language COBOL which is still in use today.

Sandra Faber (1944- )

Sandra Faber is an astrophysicist specialising in the evolution of galaxies. Some of her important contributions to science include linking the brightness of galaxies to the speed of stars within them and helping to design the Keck telescopes in Hawaii.

Are you ready to pursue a career in science? HRS is here to help! Click the link below to browse a huge selection of science jobs spanning a variety of scientific fields.

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Chemistry Jobs

Are you interested in pursuing a career as a chemist? Perhaps you’re working towards, or have recently graduated from university with a bachelor’s or master’s degree in chemistry. Or perhaps you’re looking to change careers. Whatever your circumstances, you can be sure that working in the field of chemistry will be both stimulating and challenging.

Some of the most popular chemistry jobs are:

  • Analytic Chemist

As an analytic chemist, you’ll use a variety of different methods to investigate the nature of different chemicals and substances

  • Forensic Scientist

As a forensic chemist, you’ll be in charge of gathering and analysing evidence from crimes for use in court cases.

  • Toxicologist

Toxicologists evaluate the effects of toxic materials such as; potential new medicines and radiation on human beings, animals and the environment.

This is only a small selection of roles in the field of chemistry, there are lots of other areas you can choose to specialise in, often depending on your interests, qualifications and experience.

Here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, you can browse chemistry jobs across the UK and internationally that are suitable for chemists of varying levels of ability. We constantly network and update our site to ensure we bring you the most recent and exciting opportunities on the market.

Take a look at currently available roles here:

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If you have any questions about working as a chemist, or if you’d like us to address any of your science recruitment queries, please send us an enquiry or give us a call.

Molecular Biology

Molecular biology is a branch of biology that focuses on biomolecules within various cell systems (be they human, animal, plant or otherwise) and the interactions between those biomolecules.

Molecular Biology at University

Molecular biology undergraduate courses often combine elements of biochemistry, genetics, and microbiology into a single syllabus. This allows students to explore different areas of molecular biology while also giving them an opportunity to specialise in an area that's relevant to their chosen career path.

Pursuing a Career in Molecular Biology

In order to get a job as a molecular biologist, you will need a relevant life sciences degree, as well as (ideally) some relevant work experience in a laboratory environment.

What to expect:

  • Predominantly lab-based work
  • You will mostly be carrying out molecule- and cell-focused experiments
  • You may also be responsible for managing the laboratory

Areas of work you might be involved in:

  • Antibody engineering
  • Gene therapy
  • Plant research

The average starting salary for a molecular biologist is approximately £20k a year, with lots of potential for progression as you develop your skills and grow more experienced.

Are you looking to further your molecular biology career? Click the link below to view the latest jobs from Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

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