Molecular Biology

Molecular biology is a branch of biology that focuses on biomolecules within various cell systems (be they human, animal, plant or otherwise) and the interactions between those biomolecules.

Molecular Biology at University

Molecular biology undergraduate courses often combine elements of biochemistry, genetics, and microbiology into a single syllabus. This allows students to explore different areas of molecular biology while also giving them an opportunity to specialise in an area that's relevant to their chosen career path.

Pursuing a Career in Molecular Biology

In order to get a job as a molecular biologist, you will need a relevant life sciences degree, as well as (ideally) some relevant work experience in a laboratory environment.

What to expect:

  • Predominantly lab-based work
  • You will mostly be carrying out molecule- and cell-focused experiments
  • You may also be responsible for managing the laboratory

Areas of work you might be involved in:

  • Antibody engineering
  • Gene therapy
  • Plant research

The average starting salary for a molecular biologist is approximately £20k a year, with lots of potential for progression as you develop your skills and grow more experienced.

Are you looking to further your molecular biology career? Click the link below to view the latest jobs from Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

Molecular Biology Jobs >

Scientist Quiz

Nearly 7,000 people (and counting!) have taken Hyper Recruitment Solutions' What Type of Scientist Are You? quiz since we launched it earlier this year.

And who knows? Maybe we inspired some of those individuals to consider a career that had never even occurred to them before! For instance, have you ever thought about how your innate problem-solving skills might serve you well as a data scientist? Or how your love of animals might translate into a rewarding career in zoology?

If not, be sure to take the quiz yourself before you read on to find out what results everyone else has been getting!

The Most Popular Results

Science Quiz Results - Graph

As you can see, there's been a lot of variety in the results that people have been getting from our quiz - some people are clinical scientists, some are ecologists, and some are better suited to biochemistry.

The 3 most popular results are:

  1. Geologist (14.4% of people get this result)
  2. Astronomer (13.9% of people get this result)
  3. Physicist (13.4% of people get this result)

This suggests that there are a lot of people out there with analytical minds and a great love for going outdoors - these are qualities that mesh very well with a career in geology!

We've also seen a lot of people show an interest in unlocking the really big mysteries, like whether we're alone in the universe and indeed where the universe came from in the first place. These people would make great astronomers and physicians - the second and third most popular quiz results respectively.

The least popular result was Biologist - just 4.6% of our quiz-takers are best suited to a career in biology, but that's still more than 300 people!

Take the Quiz >   Browse Science Jobs >

Clinical Science Jobs

The role of a clinical scientist is extremely important. They are responsible for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of illnesses, medical conditions and diseases.

As a clinical scientist, you’ll more than likely find yourself working within a laboratory environment, undertaking complex data analysis and utilising sophisticated software to analyse tests and results. You will work as part of a team containing a variety of specialist skill sets, such as doctors, nurses and biomedical scientists who offer professional advice, interpretation of medical results and appropriate testing methods. All of these play a fundamental role in research and the development of new drugs.

Browse our latest clinical science jobs here, or read on to find out more about this line of work.

Roles

Within the laboratory, a clinical scientist may specialise in a variety of different areas, such as:

  • Microbiology – This is the study of microbes such as viruses and bacteria, conducted to aid in the diagnosis, control and prevention of diseases and infections.

  • Genomics – The study of genetic mapping and DNA sequences to enhance the early diagnosis and inherited traits and diseases.

  • Blood Sciences – Studies focus on the chemical processes within living tissues and cells such as proteins and DNA.

  • Transplant Sciences – Involves ensuring that donated organs are correctly matched to recipients and working to reduce immune-rejection.

Each of these specialist subjects involves various activities and responsibilities. Depending on your chosen area of work, duties could include researching, developing and testing new approaches for diagnosing and treating conditions; creating and following protocols and quality control methods to ensure reliable and accurate results; or interpreting results and creating reports for colleagues to provide patients with therapeutic, diagnostic and prognostic information, as well as treatment options.

What you’ll need to be a clinical scientist

Qualifications

In order to become a clinical scientist, you will need:

  • A degree in life sciences, engineering, physics, or related to medicine
  • The completion of the 3-year NHS Healthcare Scientists Training Programme (STP)
  • Registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Skills & Abilities

Obviously, clinical science workers require certain specific skills and abilities in order to perform successfully. The most important competencies include:

  • The ability to demonstrate strong experimental and analytical skills
  • Incredible attention to detail
  • The ability to be thorough and present findings in a coherent manner
  • The ability to work well within a team and communicate effectively
  • The ability to work under pressure
  • The ability to interpret information in a precise and accurate manner

The clinical science industry is a complex and ever-changing field that requires the very best individuals in order to move forward. We at Hyper Recruitment Solutions are very experienced clinical science recruiters, and we have a great passion for helping scientists find their perfect roles.

Use the links below to learn more about the clinical science industry, or to apply for clinical vacancies online.

Clinical Science: Learn More >

View & Apply for Clinical Science Jobs >

The gender gap present in STEM careers is a persistent one. While other industries have seen the balance between men and women begin to improve, the shortage of women within STEM continues to prevail with women making up only 14.4% of STEM workers in the UK. So, why aren’t there more female scientists? It’s not an easy question to answer, and a number of in-depth studies examining the STEM gender gap have reached the same resounding (yet unsatisfying) conclusion: it’s complicated.

To really comprehend the gender gap in STEM careers, we need to look at multiple strands, ranging from socialisation to confidence. The following 3 reasons can help us understand the gender gap in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics).

1. Socialisation & Gender Stereotypes

Gender roles are generally understood to be the associative qualities, abilities and behaviours we link to a person’s gender. From colour-coded toys (pink for girls, blue for boys) onward, the divide between male from female starts at a young age. So how does this socialisation affect the gender gap in STEM industries?

Well, one study found that by the age of 6, girls are already 52% more likely to associate being 'really smart' with boys rather than girls.

These preconceived notions of intelligence, as well as the idea that there are 'girl subjects' and 'boy subjects', are bound to have a knock-on effect on the number of girls even considering pursuing STEM academically. The impact of this is reflected in university stats; in the USA, for instance, just 35% of STEM graduates are female.

2. Confidence

Confidence may be a key factor in understanding why there aren’t more female scientists. It is human nature to follow that you believe is most likely to end in success. There is a wealth of evidence to indicate that, once you remove social factors from the equation, there is no significant qualitative difference in scientific capability between the sexes – so the male majority in STEM fields can't simply be chalked up to innate scientific ability.

However, males generally display a higher level of confidence in their own scientific competence. This is a likelier explanation for the male-dominated workforce within the science industry.

3. Misconceptions & Disadvantages

It seems that there are a high number of women with the ability to pursue a science-based career who – for whatever reason – don’t choose to go in that direction. Even when women qualify to work within scientific fields, the turnover and drop-out rate of women in STEM fields remains high.

This may be partially explained by some of the misconceptions that surround the STEM industry, as well as the very real disadvantages that some women face. Childcare and maternity leave, for example, are frequently cited as deterrents for women who might otherwise have been interested in pursuing a career in science. Many countries aren't very accommodating towards women who require maternity leave, and this - combined with the general feeling that such a male-dominated industry will not be understanding about maternity requirements - can put female scientists off in a big way.

We hope this blog has helped you to understand some of the reasons why there aren’t more female scientists currently working in STEM industries. This gender gap isn’t an unchangeable state of affairs – many organisations are already working hard to get more girls interested in science and technology from a young age, and this hopefully means that there’ll be an influx of female scientists in the near future. Every little helps, and every woman who enters the STEM industry closes the gender gap a little bit more.

If you’re looking to start a career in STEM, you'll find science, technology and engineering job listings right here on the HRS website.

Browse all current vacancies >

The CRO / CMO industry has grown a lot in recent years. If you're looking to start a career in this sector, we at HRS can help you - view our CRO / CMO jobs here, or read on to learn all about the CRO and CMO industry and why it's flourishing right now.

Contract Research Organisations (CRO)

A contract research organisation is an organisation that is contracted by another firm (usually within the biotechnological, medical device and pharmaceutical industries) to provide outsourced research services.

CROs are popular because they offer a more cost-effective solution for firms seeking to produce new medicines for large and niche markets alike. By outsourcing research to CROs, the costs of conducting a trial are reduced massively as the firm will not need the infrastructure, space or manpower to run trials or conduct research themselves. Before CROs became an established method of pursuing approval for a drug, many companies would only take action when there was a sense of guaranteed approval for large markets.

This has made research into new medicines a much more feasible and affordable prospect for the average firm, reducing their general overhead costs. CROs provide a comprehensive range of services, including:

  • Clinical trial data management
  • Quality and metric reporting
  • Data entry and validation
  • Full project management

The fast growth of the CRO industry is evidence of the drastically changing pharmaceutical sector and how companies are adapting their methods to meet the ever-changing needs and demands of shareholders and society.

Contract Research Organisations

Contract Manufacturing Organisation (CMO)

A contract manufacturing organisation also serves other firms within the pharmaceutical industry on a contractual basis, but instead of providing research services, CMOs offer comprehensive drug development and manufacturing services.

Again, this assists the hiring company with scalability and allows them to focus on more important areas of their business, such as research or marketing. Alternatively, pharmaceutical firms may outsource drug manufacturing work to a CMO if they lack the expertise or facilities required to produce the quantity and/or form of a drug that is needed to perform pre-clinical and clinical trials.

The demand for the services that CMOs offer has resulted in fast growth for the CMO industry over the last decade, and this will continue as the need for CMOs increases. There are several promising trends within the CMO industry that are likely to accelerate further growth in the near future, including:

  • Flexible manufacturing plants – CMOs can invest in flexible manufacturing facilities that are designed to accommodate the changing needs of the pharmaceutical firms they cater for.

  • Cytotoxics – Cytotoxics is an area that has not received much attention but provides an opportunity for significant growth for the CMO industry due to the implications for cancer treatment.

  • Automation – The rise of automation within the CMO industry will see a reduction in the need for continuous checking of verification labour, ensuring consistency and reliability and increasing productivity levels.

CRO CMO Industry

Here at HRS, we have expertise and experience in both CRO and CMO industries, so if you’re interested in working in either of these sectors, we can help you!

View current CRO/CMO vacancies >

Contact Hyper Recruitment Solutions >

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