Bioinformatics is far from the best-known field of science jobs, but it is a steadily emerging and increasingly important one. It has been described in various ways, including – by the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry at Yale University – as “the application of computational techniques to analyse the information associated with biomolecules on a large-scale”.

A perhaps simpler way to understand it is as an amalgamation of biology, IT and computer science into a single subject. With ‘big data’ now ubiquitous across a wide range of industries, including life sciences research, scientists with computer science know-how are well-placed to take advantage of the ever-increasing breadth of career opportunities in the burgeoning bioinformatics sector.

What do bioinformaticists do?

Another way to describe the chief task of a bioinformaticist is as the logging, coding and/or retrieval of all biological information – especially proteins, DNA and mRNA – in an easily accessible format.

At the most basic level, a bioinformaticist is responsible for creating and maintaining databases of biological information. The majority of such databases consist of nucleic acid sequences and the protein sequences derived from them.

However, the most challenging bioinformatics tasks involve the analysis of sequence information, encompassing not only the discovery of the genes in DNA sequences but also the development of methods to predict the structure and/or function of newly found proteins and structural RNA sequences.

Such duties as the clustering of protein sequences into families, the alignment of similar proteins and the generation of phylogenetic trees are also central to the work of the best-qualified bioinformatics professionals.

Why is bioinformatics becoming so relevant?

It seems that there has never been a greater amount of biological data being generated than there is now, with the point at which biology, statistics and computer science cross bringing an abundance of new and exciting opportunities. Sure enough, professionals with experience of identifying, compiling, analysing and visualising huge amounts of biological and healthcare information have also never been in greater demand.

The flowering of bioinformatics as its own field has been attributed in part to a change in how industry and academia perceive it. As one bioinformatics professor, Wim Van Criekinge, has observed in an article by Science magazine: “Scientists and companies used to look at bioinformatics as a tool... but the subject has evolved from a service, like histology, to its own research arena... bioinformaticists are now the motor of the innovation.”

What are the main bioinformatics employers?

Those seeking rewarding bioinformatics roles are well-advised to look towards Cambridge, where several of the big research institutes in this field, including the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute, can be found.

However, candidates with bioinformatics skills are also regularly recruited by big pharmaceutical companies such as AstraZeneca and GlaxoSmithKline. Finally, there are also various smaller firms making use of bioinformatics, including those involved in personal care products, industrial organisms and agricultural applications.

Whatever the bioinformatics role to which you aspire may be – perhaps as a bioinformatician, biostatistician, head of bioinformatics or any of a broad range of other jobs – we can help you to find and secure it here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

Learn more about the depth of specialist expertise that we can offer to bioinformatics candidates, as well as the relevant available jobs for which you can apply right now. 


With 100% of NHS trusts supporting opportunities for people to actively participate in clinical research according to the NHS National Institute for Health Research, it’s unsurprising that the field also offers many exciting science jobs for those in possession of a nursing, life sciences or medical sciences degree.

Clinical research associates are responsible for the coordination of clinical trials for new or current drugs, so that the benefits and risks of their use can be assessed. Employment is usually within a pharmaceutical firm or contract research organisation (CRO) working on behalf of pharmaceutical companies.

What are a clinical research associate’s day-to-day duties?

The exact tasks that one can be expected to perform in this role depend on the employer, but typically range from the writing of drug trial methodologies (procedures) and the identification and briefing of appropriate trial investigators (clinicians) to monitoring the progress of a trial and writing reports.

Clinical research associates also often need to present trial protocols to a steering committee, identify and assess which facilities are suitable for use as clinical trial sites, ensure that all unused trial supplies are accounted for and close down trial sites on the completion of a trial, among many other possible responsibilities.  

As stated by Rebecca, one clinical research associate profiled in a case study on the website of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, “No two days are the same. Every compound and every study is different, so each one has unique areas you need to look at.”

What qualities are required for this role?  

There is a wide range of attributes that tend to lend themselves well to a clinical research associate career, including a confident, outgoing personality, an ability to work independently and take initiative, teamwork, tact, attention to detail and good organisational and time management skills.

Great written and oral communication skills are also a must for building effective relationships with trial centre staff and colleagues, as is an enjoyment of travel, given the great amount of time that those in this job can expect to spend out of the office visiting trials.

What qualifications are needed?

To secure a role as a clinical research associate, you will almost certainly need to have a degree or postgraduate qualification in nursing, life sciences or medical sciences. This covers such subjects as anatomy, biochemistry, chemistry, immunology, pharmacology or physiology.

Those lacking a degree or who only possess an HND are unlikely to be able to break into this field. It may occasionally be possible for them to start in an administrative role – as a clinical trials administrator or NHS study-site coordinator, for example. However, even in this instance, considerable experience – if not also additional qualifications – would be required to progress.

Is a job as a clinical research associate right for me?

Those with a suitable science background who are interested in a role involving a high level of interaction with people and plenty of travel – potentially internationally – are likely to find a clinical research associate role highly rewarding.

However, this job does also have its negative aspects, including tight deadlines and a high degree of pressure, so it is important to consider whether you would thrive in this kind of environment – as well as whether you have the time management skills to look after what may be several trials simultaneously.

Finally, there is the matter of pay. With starting salaries of around £22,000 to £28,000, rising to as much as £60,000 in some senior roles, life as a clinical research associate can also bring decent monetary reward.

Start looking for the latest exciting clinical jobs here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions today, or enquire to our team to learn more about our highly informed and specialised science recruitment services. We can be your partner on your journey to success in your new science career. 

The pharmaceutical sector is one of the principal ones that we serve here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, with many employment experts in this field among our staff.

There’s also no question that the industry is a diverse, complex and potentially highly rewarding one for new recruits, with even starter pharmacologists typically earning between £25,000 and £28,000 a year, according to the National Careers Service.

But what do you need to know if you are to break into the sector for the first time?

First of all, make sure you have the right skills

There is a wide range of skills that will require in order to succeed in the pharmaceutical industry. These include strong IT skills, encompassing data retrieval and analysis, as well as good communication skills for giving presentations and writing papers and reports.

You will also need to be able to solve problems and come up with creative solutions in experiments, work collaboratively in multidisciplinary teams and organise yourself and manage your time well. Leadership potential is another key requirement.

What qualifications are necessary?

Although it isn’t unheard-of for school leavers to secure pharmaceutical jobs – according to the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) – this is not common and further career progress would depend on the possession of higher qualifications.

To stand the best chance of securing your first pharmaceutical role, you are likely to need a degree in pharmacology, although entry may be possible with a degree in another scientific subject such as biochemistry, neuroscience, microbiology or physiology.

For employment at the major pharmaceutical companies that receive an especially high level of interest from candidates, a relevant postgraduate qualification such as a pharmacology MSc or PhD may be essential, or at least highly advantageous.

What is the role of work experience?

Work experience can be invaluable for enabling you to see what life in the pharmaceutical industry is really like, as well as to talk to those already in the sector and start making useful contacts. The presence of work experience on your CV will also show to employers that you have a genuine interest in working in the sector.

Finding a relevant placement can be extremely difficult if you are under 16, but not impossible, with some pharmaceutical firms happy to provide local students with experience in an office.

If you are 16-18, you may be able to secure a one-week or two-week work experience placement during school holidays. However, such opportunities are rarely advertised, so you will almost certainly need to get in touch with companies directly.

When you are considering university courses, it is strongly advisable to choose a course that offers a ‘year in industry’ – also sometimes referred to as a sandwich or industrial placement year. If such a placement year is not possible, it’s a good idea to aim to obtain work experience during the long summer holidays.

How can Hyper Recruitment Solutions help?

When you are looking to secure that all-important first role in pharmacology, the assistance of the right science recruitment agency can be invaluable. Hyper Recruitment Solutions has long been that agency for a wide range of individuals seeking science jobs, with a high level of expertise in relation to the pharmaceutical sector.

Talk to our experts today about how we can serve you with our broad range of services geared towards the needs of candidates. 


The fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) industry concerns goods that make a quick transition from the production lines to supermarket shelves, including food and drink, home cleaning, personal hygiene and similar items.

 

The sector certainly offers plentiful opportunities to those seeking rewarding science jobs, having been worth more than $570.1 billion as of 2015, according to The Telegraph. But what are five of the best reasons to pursue a career in FMCG?

 

1.                   It's the home of the leading brand names

 

Companies recognised the world over – such as Unilever, L'Oreal, Dove, Dettol and Walkers – are all involved in the FMCG sector, whether focused on multiple or single product areas, so securing a job in this industry enables you to be at the forefront of the latest developments instigated by the leading brands.

 

2.                   It's a highly innovative industry

 

The pressure to continue attracting consumers and fulfilling their requirements amid intense industry competition has long made FMCG a key frontier for innovation. There is always the need for fresh and exciting ideas relating to product packaging, advertising, marketing and communications, and you could be at the centre of this ever-evolving process.

 

3.                   It offers plentiful employment opportunities

 

Employment prospects in FMCG have long been strong – even during periods of recession. The sector is, after all, closely connected to retail, a sector in which 2.8 million people were employed in the UK in 2015, according to Retail Economics. However, graduates in chemical, civil/structural, control and electrical engineering disciplines are also continually sought-after by the industry's employers.

 

4.                  It's a diverse sector

 

As a matter of fact, such is the diversity and dynamism of the FMCG industry that graduates from any degree background are welcomed, which marks it out from many of the other sectors that we serve as a science recruitment agency here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions. Whatever degree you studied, there are opportunities for you to gain employment and make an impact in this exciting industry.

 

5.                  It serves consumer needs

 

If you like the idea of a career that makes a difference to ordinary people's lives, an FMCG role could be a good match to your values and ambitions. There will always be a need for affordable and available consumer goods ranging from toiletries and other consumables to stationery and over-the-counter medicines, and with every person in the world being a consumer, your work will be essential to satisfying this demand.

 

Secure that dream FMCG role with Hyper Recruitment Solutions

 

The FMCG sector may be just one of the many that we serve here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, also including the likes of pharmaceuticals, biotechnology and telecommunications, but we can nonetheless make a big difference to your ability to land a rewarding job in this important sector.

 

Our science recruitment agency was founded by Ricky Martin in partnership with Lord Alan Sugar, and provides the services – including CV writing tips, interview advice and advertisements of the latest FMCG job vacancies – that will help you to begin or further your FMCG career. Contact us today about our widely acclaimed recruitment services and expertise. 


The fact that 47% of UK workers would like to change career, according to the London School of Business and Finance (LSBF), should serve as a powerful reminder to employers using science recruitment agencies that many of those applying for their latest advertised entry-level vacancies will be older career switchers, rather than necessarily fresh-out-of-university 20-somethings. 

Indeed, you may be one of them. So, whether you are established in one science field and would like to switch to another one, or you have never been employed in a science role before, what steps will you require to make your dream career change work?

Assess your present situation

People approach the idea of changing to a new scientific career from many different angles, so you need to carefully consider your exact motivations. Why are you looking to switch career at all? What makes you unhappy in your current role? What do you dream of doing instead?

By asking yourself these questions, you may quickly realise that it is your co-workers or company culture, rather than your actual job duties, that leave you discontent. Such a drastic change in your life as a whole new career should be very carefully considered before you take the plunge.

Research the science jobs that interest you

If it becomes clear that your job itself is the problem, take the time to identify your passions, strengths, skills and abilities, and then start looking at career sites and job descriptions to get a sense of whether that long yearned-for science role really would suit you.

You may possess certain qualifications already that enable you to take a certain step, or you may find that there are much greater obstacles to switching to a certain science field like pharmacology, immunology or energy.

Also, what do the science jobs that most interest you actually involve on a daily basis? The last thing that you will want to do is invest significant time and money into changing to a career that dissatisfies you just as much as your last one, as can happen if you don't do the necessary research at this still relatively early stage.

Get networking!

Once you have come up with a more specific idea of what your dream science job would look like, it's time to start talking to professionals in that industry about their own job and its day-to-day responsibilities. They will be able to give you a sense of whether this new science career really could be the right one for you.

Another benefit of networking is that if the job does sound like the right one, the contacts that you gain could be instrumental in landing you an interview or that first entry-level role.

Investigate training opportunities

This is when things start getting truly serious - investigating the training opportunities for the kind of science jobs that you would like to pursue.

Remember that the entry requirements, qualifications and certifications relevant to different science sectors can be hugely varied, and that while some of them will merely give you one more advantage when you come to apply for jobs, others may be mandatory if you wish to have any career in that field at all. The right qualifications can also help to make adjusting to the demands of a new and unfamiliar role much quicker and easier.

Start job hunting!

This is the stage at which we can be of greatest assistance here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, thanks to our extensive services for candidates including - but not limited to - CV tips, interview advice and of course, advertisements of job vacancies. 

As one of the most renowned science recruitment agencies active today, we appreciate that it may have been a while since you last looked for work, and that the task of seeking your dream initial science role can be overwhelming.

So, allow us to be your guide when you are looking to make that big career change to the rewarding science job that you may have always craved. Good luck!

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