‘Company culture’ may be an elusive thing to define at times, but neither employers nor candidates are in any doubt as to its importance.

A survey cited in The New York Times found that eight in 10 employers worldwide considered ‘cultural fit’ to be their top hiring priority. Meanwhile, ‘people and culture fit’ was the top thing that Millennials looked for in an employer, according to research cited in Harvard Business Review, above even ‘career potential’ and ‘work/life balance’.

So, once you have undergone all of the stress of applying for science jobs, passing through the interview and then finally securing your dream role, how can you ensure you are that ‘cultural fit’ your employer is likely to desire so much?

Thoroughly research the organisation

The more you know about the culture of your employer before you walk through its doors, the more proactive you can be in adapting to and embodying that culture – so be sure to do your homework well in advance.

Have you discussed the company culture with the contacts that you already have within the organisation, such as the HR staff that interviewed and hired you? Do your friends have any contacts that have worked for the company before and can give you some tips?

The Internet is also a good place to research companies, but be careful here – with Glassdoor reviews being anonymous, you can never be completely sure as to their authenticity. It may therefore be better to thoroughly immerse yourself in your new employer’s website first, paying particular attention to any ‘vision’ or ‘mission statement’ pages.

Take an open approach

It can take a while to fully acclimatise to the culture of a new employer, and organisations tend to be understanding of this. Indeed, in your early days, you should focus just as much on becoming accustomed to the company’s culture and people as you do on the work itself.

Be observant, and don’t be afraid to ask questions if necessary, of co-workers as well as your boss. Make any notes that you need to make of people’s names, job titles and contact details, as forgetting this information will be much more embarrassing later on than it will be during your first days and weeks at the company.

Maintain engagement over time

Don’t presume that you are automatically embedded into your company’s culture once the first week, month or even quarter has passed. The truth is that fitting in with the culture of your new employer will require continual effort, not least as culture naturally shifts over time with changes in workload and priorities.

So, take every opportunity that you can, even when you have spent a year or more in your new position, to ingrain yourself further into the culture of the company, such as by attending and participating in any weekly meetings, annual conferences and holiday parties.

The more steps that you can take to fit into the culture of your employer, the less likely you are to be among the 89% of hiring failures – according to one Forbes article from a few years ago – that are attributable to poor cultural fit.    

Are you looking to partner with a science recruitment agency with the strongest track record in enabling ambitious people like you to secure the best science jobs? If so, simply get in touch with Hyper Recruitment Solutions today, or read more about the many sectors in which we have hiring expertise.   

Job Search Problems

The most recent statistics concerning the UK job market are unquestionably positive. According to the Office for National Statistics, the number of people in work has been increasing so far this year, and the employment rate is at its joint highest since comparable records began in 1971. So why are so many job seekers concerned that they won’t be able to find a rewarding new position this year?

Today, we'd like to look at 4 job search problems that people commonly worry about, and explain why you really shouldn’t be too anxious when you are hunting for your next role.

1. Gaps on your CV

It's fair to assume that most potential employers will ask you about especially large / recent gaps in your CV, but if you have a perfectly understandable reason for yours – taking time out to care for an ill relative, for instance – no decent employer will judge you harshly for it.

Furthermore, if the gap was a long time ago or only a few months long, it’s unlikely that you will even be asked about it.

2. Missing a job from your CV

Many job seekers worry that they’re supposed to include every single job they’ve ever had on their CV, even if it has little relevance to the role for which they are applying.

Remember that your CV is ultimately a marketing document, and that it’s therefore fine to leave off that call centre job you only had for a few weeks post-university, especially when you are seeking a role in a highly specialised science field like biotechnology or immunology.

(However, if removing a certain job from your CV would leave a several-year gap, it’s probably best to be truthful, even if that job had little or no connection to the career that you are seeking now.)

3. Giving a complicated justification for a certain salary

It's easy, especially if you are still relatively new to the job market, to assume that you will need to justify any particular desired salary in very complicated terms. Most of the time, though, it really doesn’t need to be like that.

In most cases, all you'll need to do is say: 'I was hoping that you could go up to £XX,XXX – is this possible?' From there, the negotiation process is often a very simple one.

4. Contacting former managers

Many of those who approach our science recruitment agency are understandably concerned because they believe they must give their most recent manager or university tutor as a reference (so as to avoid giving the impression that they were on poor terms with them). But what if getting in touch with that person would be difficult anyway – for example, if they have retired or are travelling on the other side of the world?

Ultimately, you should include that past manager or tutor as a reference for the aforementioned reason, but not worry about how they will be contacted. Making them one of your references is only about giving permission for your prospective employer to get in touch with them, and has nothing to do with whether they are actually available.

Remember that one of the best ways to minimise job search worry is to be as well-prepared as possible! That’s why, here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we provide such comprehensive help to those seeking jobs in the science sector.

Contact us now to find out how we can help with your science job search.

The established wisdom in job interview preparation is that while dressing well will never overcome deficiencies in what you actually say in front of a prospective employer, it can nonetheless play a big role in projecting a more positive image of yourself.

Indeed, there have even been indications recently that the saying "the clothes make the man (or woman)" has more truth to it than many of us realise, a study cited in The Atlantic finding evidence that people's thought processes change when they wear a suit.

So, you might know the importance of dressing smartly when being interviewed for jobs - but what exactly does that entail?

How suitable 'interview wear' differs between the sexes

The basic rules of interview dress arguably don't change much whether you are a man or a woman - you are still best advised to wear something comfortable and that you actually feel confident in. It's a good idea to go for 'safer' colours like black, not using more than three colours across your entire outfit, while you should also pay attention to all of those 'small' aspects, such as shoes and socks.

Beyond these broad principles, if you are attending an interview for a role, whether it is in chemistry, pharmacology, immunology or a different scientific or technical field altogether, you will almost certainly be expected to dress more formally than the 'business casual' that can be prevalent in interviews for other job sectors.

What men might wear to a science job interview

A good rule of thumb is to dress one level more formal than would be expected in the day-to-day job. For men, that often means opting for darker, more sober colours, choosing cotton instead of linen on account of the latter's tendency to crease easily, and brown or black shoes - leather rather than suede.

Colours are an important consideration for men, which at the most basic level, means avoiding distracting or garish ties and socks. Also give thought to colour combinations and coordination - while blue can be made to work with brown, the same cannot be said of black and brown.

Some good dress pointers for women

Suits aren't merely timeless - they also effortlessly cross gender lines. Further down one's outfit is a different story, with women needing to choose between trousers and a skirt. If opting for the latter, the distance between the hemline and the knee should not exceed the length of one biro.

Women, like men, are advised to wear darker colours like black, navy or brown, although a lighter, plainer colour can be a good choice in the summer. Scarfs can also be a source of brighter colour, but patterns anywhere are generally a no-no. Any blouse is best plain, and heels should not be too high.

While many would reasonably argue that there are no hard-and-fast rules governing what to wear to an interview with a recruitment agency, the above should nonetheless constitute sound guidelines for the many of us who consider the thorny issue of interview wear almost as intimidating as the interview itself.   

virtual interview tips

One of the biggest changes in the world of science recruitment in recent years - indeed, in any recruitment field - has been the rise of the virtual job interview.

Virtual interviews can be defined as "any form of interview that uses information and communication technologies (ICTs) such as email, discussion board, real-time chat or video chat system such as Skype."

While many of the usual principles of how to handle a job interview also apply for a virtual job interview, the latter also comes with certain distinctive challenges - so don't forget the below advice when faced with one. Here are some virtual job interview tips for you to consider:

Get comfortable with the technology

Particularly when you are being interviewed for more technical science jobs, it is important to get the associated technology in order and not appear overawed or intimidated by it - any attempted small-talk about how weird it is to be interviewed 'virtually' is likely to create the wrong impression.

If technical issues do occur - as can happen with even the best preparation - respond in a professional way, asking the interviewer to repeat the question if necessary and politely asking if you can disconnect and reconnect if the problem is persistent.

Also keep signalling acknowledgement - such as by saying "yes" or "hmm" or nodding the head - so that the interviewer is in no doubt that you can hear them.

Project the most professional impression

There are so many issues of professional presentation or lack thereof that can arise in a virtual interview if you do not thoroughly and suitably prepare.

Dress remains as important in a virtual interview as it does in a face-to-face one. Indeed, with one recent study suggesting that simply wearing a suit affects the way you think, it is advisable to dress smartly even for a phone interview.

Other presentation issues that can arise during a virtual job interview include your cat walking into the shot, unmade bedding in the background, harsh lighting or an unflattering camera angle - again, all problems that need to be ironed out in the preparation rather than during the interview itself.

Be sure to adopt the right interview manner

In all of your anxiety to project the desired impression of a competent candidate, it can be easy to forget such apparent basics as actually looking into the camera rather than your image on the screen, keeping a straight posture and being subtle in reference to any notes that you have placed nearby to aid you.

Remember, too, not to over-rehearse - in a virtual interview as much as in a 'real' one, a natural manner can go a long way to making you a more engaging interviewee.

There are so many other important things to keep in mind when being interviewed 'virtually', from choosing a professional username if this is required for any videoconferencing technology you use, to keeping a printout of your CV and other key documentation nearby.

If there's one thing that definitely applies to virtual interviews as much as it does to 'normal' in-person interviews, it is the great importance of preparation - so never underestimate it if you are called to such an interview by a recruitment agency. 

We hope these virtual job interview tips help you but if there is anything else you are unsure of, feel free to contact us today



It hopefully won't have passed your notice that here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we don't merely provide services to candidates! Indeed, it is a natural part of our work in matching science jobs to those seeking vacancies in such fields as pharmacology, biochemistry and molecular biology that we also work very closely with organisations in need of talent in these categories.

Your business or organisation doubtless needs to get the New Year off to the best possible start, so here's how you can do just that by investing in the best talent in partnership with a leading science recruitment agency like Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

The most suitable candidate will bring long-term value

Let's imagine that you have found a candidate who seems to be making all of the right noises. They have great qualifications, their CV shows a lot of relevant experience and they appear to be a friendly, curious and determined 'team player'. Why is it so important to hire someone with the right attributes?

There is, of course, the financial aspect to consider - a hire who turns out to be unsuitable could cost your business many thousands of pounds to replace. This can in itself hold back your organisation from achieving its 2016 goals, particularly if you are a small firm and margins are tight already.

Mostly, however, the value of the best candidate is in how they can actively power your organisation forward, for month after month and year after year. Whoever you hire now will effectively be the face of your business in 2016 - so not only do they need to have the right skills and experiences, but they should also truly believe in your science organisation's mission, values and work.

Fuel your company's growth with the right hire

The graduate or new starter that you hire now may be occupying a senior position at your organisation in years to come. With their fresh perspective, energy and ideas, they can be instrumental as ambassadors for your business, helping you to create an effective 'employer brand' that will attract even more of the right people.

Don't forget that investing in the right people isn't just about finding and hiring those people - it's also about treating and training them well to minimise the likelihood of them ever wanting to leave your company. Studies have shown that employers that train their employees are three times less likely to lose them than those that don't.

Do you have exciting new science jobs to fill? Contact Hyper Recruitment Solutions right now about our acclaimed and highly compliant science recruitment solutions, so that your company takes on only the best talent in the New Year.  


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