Tell us what you look for when hiring! Our survey takes just 2-3 minutes to complete.

Employer Survey

We’re asking employers what they look for in job applicants. As a prestigious recruitment company, it’s important to us that we identify what really matters to you when looking to fill a vacancy – helping applicants become better means increasing the quality of applications you receive. Click here to take the survey!

Why complete our survey?

Here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we know just how frustrating it can be when job applicants don’t get the basics right - after all, there's so much advice out there to help you get it right! But that advice can often be contradictory, and the job market is made up of so many different roles and sectors that it's sometimes hard to know which rules apply across the board.

That's where our survey comes in. Each response from an employer or hiring manager gives us a better idea of what applicants can do better - so don’t miss the chance to have your say on what really matters to you during the recruitment process. It takes just 2-3 minutes, and it really makes a difference!

What areas does the survey cover?

This survey covers virtually every aspect of the job application process, from CV length to providing suitable references. We hope that, by collecting solid feedback on these topics from real-life employers, our survey will be a real help to job seekers who aren't quite sure where to start.

Complete the survey now >

Who are we?

Hyper Recruitment Solutions are an elite recruitment company specialising in the science and technology sectors. We aim to create a better world for employers and job seekers alike - click here to learn about the services we provide for employers.

Contract Workers

In recent years, contract work has grown to be a massively popular option for workers and employers alike. Contracting allows individuals to feel more in control and achieve a better work/life balance while tackling a variety of rewarding new challenges; it also benefits businesses to be able to take on a person with a specific skill set for a short period of time. This is a relatively low-risk option, and contractors can be instrumental in helping an organisation to move forward.

The benefits of hiring a contractor

  • Flexibility - This is probably the primary reason to hire a contractor rather than a permanent employee. A contract worker may be hired on a short-term basis and can move on easily if, for instance, the project is completed early or your budget is cut short. Contractors are ideal for seasonal businesses that peak and trough over the course of a year, and contractors who aren't quite right for your organisation are easier to replace than full-time employees.

  • Efficiency - Sometimes, a looming deadline or pressing assignment may necessitate an influx of new staff to help get the job done on time. Contracting is a great option in such situations; contract workers can be brought in as needed to assist overstretched departments until the workload eases off.

  • Specialised skills - Some projects require a specific/unusual skill set that you don't usually keep on your payroll. Many contractors possess an abundance of experience in niche areas, meaning that businesses don't have to waste time training them - they can hit the ground running from day one. Contractors are likely to be fully licensed and up-to-date with current legislation and market trends, and they tend to be experienced in a number of different areas, enabling them to bring new ideas to the table and give an outsider's perspective on your business.

  • Cutting costs - It may well cost less to hire a highly-qualified contractor for a short period of time than to train up a permanent employee yourself and keep them on the books indefinitely.

Contracting through HRS

The above is a mere sample of the many advantages that come with hiring contractors. Here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we help both contractors and businesses to find the right fit quickly and with minimal fuss. Our contractors enjoy a number of benefits, such as quality representation, competitive rates, assistance with finding the best possible roles, and a wide choice of clients ranging from large pharmaceutical companies to small scientific start-ups.

As companies all over the UK (and beyond) continue to realise the benefits of taking on contractors, more and more contracting opportunities will arise.

Whether you are a business looking to offer contract work or a contract worker looking for a new challenge, please contact HRS today for expert assistance.

See our Contracting at HRS page for more information!

How to Write a Job Description

The most recent Labour Market Outlook report issued by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) stated that the number of vacancies in the UK economy remains well above historical average levels, and this news should lead many science employers to consider whether they really are doing everything they can to inspire and attract candidates.

Your company’s approach to writing job descriptions is one key aspect that you may wish to examine. Writing a good job description is a very important part of any attempt to fill a vacancy, so how does one write a job description that the very best candidates will feel compelled to respond to?

Here are five top tips from the experts here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions:


1. Be clear and realistic about the role's responsibilities.

The most important part of a job description is the list of day-to-day tasks for which the successful candidate will assume responsibility. Don’t be vague when writing this list, but don’t try to cram too many duties in, either. A good rule of thumb is to aim for 8-12 key areas of responsibility.


2. Use an engaging tone.

Remember that the whole point of a job description - besides outlining the most basic details about the job - is to persuade someone to come and work for your organisation.

A dry and impersonal tone will cause candidates to lose interest before they have even finished reading the description. By placing the emphasis on where your company is going and what you can do for the candidate, you will make your description much more compelling.


3. Avoid discriminatory language.

Even when you don’t specifically intend to discriminate against anyone, the use of certain words and phrases in your job description can have that effect anyway, and this may restrict the range of candidates that apply for your vacancies. Bad news if you're trying to diversify your workforce!

As the GOV.UK website details, employers discriminate against candidates in a number of different ways, so you should take every measure to ensure that your job descriptions don’t prevent suitable candidates from applying for your vacancy.


4. Use terminology that candidates will understand.

Of course, if you’re advertising for a senior role in pharmacology, engineering, another specialised science sector like those that we serve here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, using certain industry-specific terms may be a good way to ensure that you only hear from qualified candidates.

However, if certain technologies or practices within your organisation are known by names that outsiders are unlikely to recognise, you could find yourself inadvertently deterring perfectly suitable candidates. Read your job description carefully and do your best to eliminate any confusing or ambiguous jargon.


5. Play it straight with the job title.

Required skills and day-to-day responsibilities should make up the ‘meat’ of your job description, but there are certain other basic elements that all job descriptions need if they are to be truly effective - and you need to get those elements right.

Consider the job title, for example. This definitely isn’t a part of your job description where you should be using any confusing or obscure terms. The job title should be something that all candidates will immediately understand; this will attract more interest, more, and of course more applications.


Are you an employer looking to bolster your science recruitment efforts? If so, visit the Hyper Recruitment Solutions website to find out how we can help you.

Relationships - both personal and professional - are a fact of life, and if you wish to make the swiftest progress up the science career ladder, you will almost certainly need to cultivate harmonious relationships with those of relevance to your chosen sector. 

Of course, we serve those seeking roles in any of a broad range of science sectors here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, from biotechnology and pharmacology to energy and medical devices.

But in a world in which - according to one study shared on LinkedIn - as many as 85% of jobs are filled via networking, there are undoubted benefits to expanding your range of science-related contacts beyond simply signing up with a leading recruitment agency.

Here are some tips on how to do it.

Focus on quality, not just quantity

It's easy for many people attracted to the mystique of networking to think it's about little more than building a long list of contacts. However, what really matters is the quality of those contacts and how well connected you are to them. 

The best contacts aren't just those who have heard a rumour about a job opening at X company or Y company, or any other random person. Instead, they're the people who can give you useful and current information and additional relevant contacts. They are likely to be able to give you informed advice, in addition to meaningful assistance with your applications for science jobs.

But think, too, about how tight and personal the bond is with the most potentially useful contacts you already have. Do you know their name, job title and specific areas of interest? What about their educational history or family?

If you can get in phone contact with that contact and receive a positive, receptive response to whatever you ask them, they are a useful contact. Otherwise, they are simply one more name in your database.

Treat contacts with respect

Do you treat your contacts as potential allies - people who you listen to and who you can help with their own pain points, rather than merely people who can give you what they want? Your message to your contacts should be that you value them highly and - ideally - want to support and help them.

After all, showing respect to your contacts will maximise the likelihood that they respond in kind.

Part of this process should be being clear about what you want from that contact before approaching them, so that you do not waste their - or your - time. What kind of science job are you looking for, and what kind of boss are you seeking? Is this a person who is likely to help you, given your answers to the aforementioned questions?

Be patient and appreciative

Cultivating a contacts list that will actually help you to secure that longed-for science job will require a lot of patience and appreciation. Make sure you express your gratitude by personally thanking those who give you any form of help with your job search, and don't forget to 'check in' periodically and attempt to reciprocate with your own assistance, if you can.

According to one recent survey of US adults by Pew Research Center, 66% used connections with close friends or family in their most recent job search, while 63% used professional or work connections and 55% used acquaintances or friends of friends.

Clearly, then, networking looks unlikely to become any less important in the job search process any time soon. So, why not create what may prove to be one of your most crucial contacts of all, by making use of our considerable expertise in any of a vast range of science industries here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions?

The latest statistics point to a job market that saw steady rather than spectacular progress in 2016. The Office for National Statistics’ recently released UK labour market report shows that there were 31.8 million people in work as of September to November last year, an improvement by 294,000 on a year earlier.

However, time invariably marches on, with many candidates for science jobs and their potential employers now turning their attentions firmly to 2017. What are some of the trends that will likely define the science recruitment market in the year ahead?

1.    A culture of engagement

As the CIPD’s Employee Outlook report for autumn 2016 has stated, while the UK’s net job satisfaction has improved since spring 2016 – now sitting at +40 – this is still some way short of the +48 recorded for autumn 2015.

As a result, it’s fair to say that most science organisations could probably improve their engagement strategies, which looks likely to be a key focus in the coming 12 months. More engaged employees will be more effective brand ambassadors, which will significantly aid your recruitment drive.

2.    The continued primacy of mobile

According to Pew Research Center, 28% of all Americans have used a smartphone to search for a job, rising to 53% of those aged between 18 and 29 – and you can bet that similar trends are continuing to hold sway on this side of the Atlantic.

It therefore couldn’t be more important to continue the optimisation of your science organisation’s online presence for mobile users. If potential candidates visit your site via their smartphone or tablet and find it inaccessible, slow-loading or difficult to navigate, they are unlikely to remain for long.

3.     Workplace diversity remains crucial

The benefits of more diverse workforces are well-documented, but nonetheless bear repeating. Firms with greater diversity in their personnel are more adaptable, can offer a broader range of skills and experiences and deliver better overall results.  

Management consultancy McKinsey & Company, for example, found that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity were 15% more likely to financially outperform those in the bottom quartile . For ethnic diversity, the figure was 35%. 

4.     Treating the candidate like a customer

That term that has been mentioned so often in recruitment circles in the last few years – ‘candidate experience’ – certainly won’t go away in 2017. In fact, science employers will need to make even more of an effort to make candidates feel as pampered as a customer, throughout the recruitment process, if they are to lure the biggest talent.

With Millennial and Generation Z jobseekers notoriously impatient compared to those before them, more emphasis is set to be placed on a swift and efficient candidate experience than ever before.

5.     Centring an employer brand around the employee

With so many avenues through which disgruntled (or for that matter, contented) current or former employees of your organisation can voice their true opinions of what it is like to work for your firm, it is becoming even harder to preserve a certain image of your organisation without your employees’ cooperation.

2017 will therefore be a year in which you need to be more alert than ever to manage your employer brand, in large part by cultivating the best possible working environment.

Are you a science employer looking to work with experts in such sectors as biotechnology, pharmacology and medical devices to secure the talent that your firm needs in the 12 months ahead? Talk to Hyper Recruitment Solutions about the wide-ranging, specialised and informed recruitment solutions on which we have built our reputation. 

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