The CV has been said to be dying – or at least nearing its end – on more than a few occasions in the past. Just look at reports from the likes of the Daily Mail that candidates are increasingly replacing their CVs with ‘MeVies’ – footage of themselves designed to catch an employer’s eye – or statistics shared by Dr Tim Sparkes for People Management indicating that only one in 10 Millennials provided a digital CV at their last interview

Nor is it a surprise that people might come to such conclusions. After all, we are seemingly living in a more ‘connected’ world than ever. Why do you still need such an outdated or cumbersome thing as a CV, when you can simply text or email a prospective employer, perhaps directing them towards your LinkedIn profile? 

Well, for one thing, many potential employers will still end an online conversation with you by asking you to send them your CV. As much as they might appreciate you telling them everything about yourself that makes you such a great candidate for their vacancy or company, they still usually like to have something simple and concise to glance back at – and nothing fulfils that role quite as well as a CV.

A digital profile isn’t the answer to everything

There are a few other reasons why online profiles and portfolios haven’t completely replaced the CV as yet. For example, while you could theoretically alter your LinkedIn profile to target only the latest vacancy for which you happen to be applying, it would be quite a hassle to have to do so every single time you contacted a company about a role.

A CV, by contrast, can be tweaked and tailored so that at any one time, you can have several alternate versions from which to choose, depending on the latest employer or sector that you are targeting. You can emphasise certain skills and experiences while de-emphasising others, and the prospective employer will still see that same information and layout whenever they look back at it.

By contrast, you can’t control exactly who, and from exactly what industry, is looking over your LinkedIn or other online profile at any one time. That’s not to suggest that your LinkedIn profile doesn’t have its own invaluable role, not least as it is capable of containing information that you might not be able to fit onto a two-page CV.

However, a polished CV remains a crucial part of your armoury when you come to market yourself to employers. This is why, here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we furnish our candidates with all of the advice they need to refine and tailor their CV for science jobs.

CVs remain a key part of your wider branding package

It’s impossible to say exactly what will happen to the CV in the years to come – many theories have been proposed about its likely fate, and many new and ongoing trends cited.

What is clear, though, is that right now, the CV continues to play a crucial role in candidates’ dealings with science recruitment agencies and employers. It’s a portable and easy-to-refer-to part of your wider branding package that should also include the likes of online profiles and portfolios and cover letters.

Whether you are looking for a job in biotechnology, pharmacology, the environment or any of a wide range of science sectors, here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we will help you to make your own CV as relevant and impactful as possible. Simply contact our team today to learn more


Hyper Recruitment Solutions are delighted to announce that Managing Director, Ricky Martin has been elected as the Chair of the REC's Life Sciences CommitteeThe REC’s flagship Life Sciences sector group provides specialist support and advice to recruitment agencies working in a range of areas including pharmaceuticals, scientific research, biochemistry and biomedical technology.

After previously joining the committee as the Vice Chair, Ricky aims to further support the standards and professional in recruitment across the sciences. Moving forwards he aims to ensure there are more frequent communications on key topics surrounding the Life Sciences Sector to help further improve the standards across recruitment in this sector. 

The UK life Sciences sector generates a turnover of over £56 billion, is one of the strongest and most productive life sciences sectors in the world and employs over 160,000 people. It is therefore essential that we have a dedicated and specialist recruitment sector to support it. 

“Science saves lives! I intend to lead the committee, members and all life sciences recruiters in the UK, to ensure we do our best to support this. I look forward to working with you all. Please do not hesitate to reach out to me, should you ever need my support” Ricky Martin

About the REC

The Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) is the professional body for UK recruitment businesses. Established since 1930, representing 82% of the recruitment market place by value, the REC support their members by helping businesses find the people they need, while improving the standards and reputation of the recruitment industry. The REC lead the way in defining better recruitment standards and practice – this is imperative to building a world class jobs market. The REC work with recruiters that can make a real difference.

  
Today’s candidates for science jobs in such fields as pharmacology, biotechnology and medical devices are generally savvy and understand the need to prepare well for an interview, including by researching their prospective employer.

The latter is vital not just for giving applicants a sense of what kind of company they could soon be working for, but also for helping them to confirm that this is definitely an organisation for which they would like to work.

After all, past research has indicated that 42% of workers are motivated by how well they get on with their colleagues, and 22% by how their manager treats them.

However, with even the most disreputable firms able to make themselves look good these days by having an impressive website designed complete with engaging written copy, the interview may be the first time you come into contact with your potential employer as they truly are.

In that case, what are the things that you need to look out for?

The premises

As you approach the site of your interview, you should consider the surroundings. Is the company’s office located in a decent area? Is the building itself well-maintained and presentable? What about the inside of the premises – are the bathrooms clean and is there somewhere to take a break at lunchtime?

Remember that you may well spend more of your waking hours at work than anywhere else, so it needs to be the kind of place where you can imagine yourself working comfortably for long hours.

The people

As you will need to do this anyway if you secure a role with this firm, it’s a good idea to talk to as many people as possible on the premises before you are called into the interview room, as this will give you a clue of the atmosphere there.

You should ask yourself whether the receptionist seems friendly, for example, or whether they seem overly busy, stressed out and inconvenienced by you being there. Look, too, at how other employees on site are interacting with each other – do these seem like people that you could work alongside for hour after hour?

The interview

How you present yourself at the interview is obviously vital, which is why we have previously blogged on such subjects as what your body language says during an interview. However, you shouldn’t become so focused on this that you fail to evaluate your potential employer.

You can gain a lot of clues about the company’s management culture by observing how the interviewer behaves. Did they turn up on time and seem relaxed, prepared and interested in you and your answers? Or did they leave you waiting and appear to be stressed and overwhelmed when they did finally arrive?

While you might not be working directly with this person if you do get the job, they are likely to be representative of the company’s broader culture, so any warning signs should be noted.

With as many as nine in 10 people expressing regret about rushing their career choice, it really is crucial to take the time at this stage to carefully consider your prospective employer’s merits. The interview may be the only time you directly interact with the company that could be your employer for many years to come, so you should be vigilant in keeping an eye out for good and bad signs alike. 


With almost half (49%) of UK workers having signalled an intention to move jobs in 2016 – according to an Investors in People survey as reported by LondonLovesBusiness.com – it is surely inevitable that even many of those in the most rewarding science jobs will have occasionally considered quitting.

People decide to move on for all manner of reasons – so here are five of the things that you may be doing that could be contributing to your own firm’s staff attrition.

Micromanagement

Whatever science sector your organisation may be involved in – perhaps pharmacology, clinical, medical devices or something entirely different – you won’t make your employees happy by continually micromanaging them.

There’s a good reason why your staff are trained and experienced to such a high level – they need to be if they are to do their jobs, so you should give them the space to fulfil their duties.

A lack of the right tools

For some science roles it may simply be standard office supplies that are required, whereas for others, there may be a need for much more specialised equipment.

Whatever the situation, your staff should have the tools that enable them to do their jobs in the safest and most competent manner possible.

Poor morale

Ultimately, a business is about not just the building in which it is based, but also its people and the morale among its employees. Unfortunately, however, all too many managers are intimidating, communicate poorly and don’t provide their staff with an adequate work/life balance.

Your employees need to feel that they are in an environment in which they will be appreciated and rewarded for their hard work – otherwise, don’t be surprised if they look for other science jobs.

Favouritism

Treating certain staff or departments more favourably than others – whether that means providing greater resources and attention or simply not placing the same demands upon them – is another sure way to breed resentment.

Indeed, those within your team who may be willing to take on more responsibility or work overtime may be effectively punished for this through a lack of managerial support.

Too many meetings

If your staff members are being constantly distracted from their core duties by meetings, how can you expect them to be productive and happy workers? At the very least, any meetings that you do hold should have a definite sense of purpose, with an expectation that real changes or improvements will be made as a result of what was discussed and someone will be held accountable for it.  

But all too often, certain science organisations hold meetings for the sake of holding meetings and nothing changes in how the firm works, other than employee disillusionment.

The discovery earlier this year by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) that UK workers’ job satisfaction was at a two-year low – as reported by The Independent - should make it even more obvious that your staff must be managed well if you are to get the best out of them.   

When you require a reputable science recruitment agency with the ability to provide all manner of tailored recruitment solutions, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Hyper Recruitment Solutions. We are also trusted experts in candidate screening and are fully compliant with current recruitment and employment law, so we really can bring you the complete service.

Continual development and innovation in medical devices is crucial to ensuring quality of life in the UK and across the world. The term ‘medical devices’ is naturally an extremely broad one, encompassing such items as syringes, wheelchairs, pacemakers, X-ray machines, orthopaedic devices, coronary artery stents and many more.

Regardless, there can be little doubt about the field’s great importance in safeguarding the wellbeing of our increasingly health-aware population.

It is thanks to medical devices that diseases can be detected earlier and diagnoses, treatment and patient monitoring relentlessly improved. Breakthroughs and refinements in medical device technology have also been crucial for reducing the costs of healthcare at a time when health services around the world – not least the NHS – seem to be under greater financial pressure than ever.

What is the state of the UK medical device industry today?

A quick glance at the key statistics relating to the UK’s present medical device industry should serve to further underline its importance. According to the Association of British Healthcare Industries (ABHI), the UK medical technology sector was made up of more than 2,000 companies as of 2009, with four-fifths of those being small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Emergo has said that the UK medical device market was valued at $9.9 billion in 2008, making it the third largest in Europe behind Germany and France. About 50,000 people are said to be employed in the sector, which is also trade positive in the UK, exporting more than it imports. It is a key part of a wider life sciences industry that has been hailed as one of the key contributors to the UK economy. 

However, ABHI has also said that “action is needed if the UK is to continue to thrive in this area and patients are to realise the full benefits of medical technology”. Furthermore, it’s clear that with many of the most exciting and lucrative science jobs today being in medical devices, science recruitment agencies like Hyper Recruitment Solutions have a crucial role to play in helping to match the right talent to the right medical device industry vacancies and employers.  

What you need to know if you are interested in a medical devices career

Although medical devices tend to be based on mechanical, electrical and/or materials engineering, which will place those with qualifications in any of these fields at a distinct advantage, prospective entrants to the sector are also expected to have a strong biological and biological sciences background.

The skill-set that you will require to succeed in the medical device sector will depend largely on the specific job in which you are interested. While, for example, a research and development role may place an emphasis on strong engineering skills, if you are to be tasked with the management of a team of people on a project, ‘softer’ skills like communication and team leadership will be crucial.

Meanwhile, ‘people skills’ and a willingness to travel are prerequisites for those working in the sales side of the sector, as is a high level of knowledge in – and enthusiasm for – the devices that they are to be responsible for selling. 

When seeking your next big role in the medical devices industry – whether it will be your first or the latest of many – you shouldn’t hesitate to draw upon our considerable sector-specific expertise here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, including in such sub-areas as quality assurance, quality control, regulatory affairs, manufacturing, validation, clinical trials or any of a wide range of others.  


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