What Type of Scientist Am I?

Have you ever wondered whether you'd make a good scientist? More to the point, have you ever wondered what type of scientist you'd most enjoy being?

If so, we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions have just the thing for you: our new What Type of Scientist Am I? quiz!

Our company founder, the one and only Ricky Martin, will be your quiz host - all you need to do is answer 10 questions about your personality and the things you enjoy. These questions will help us decide what type of scientist we think you are best-suited to be.

Once you've finished the quiz, you'll get your own character profile and a list of the different fields your type of scientist might work in (plus a few well-known scientists from those fields).

Of course, this is just a bit of fun - for serious careers advice that's specific to the science industry, we strongly recommend that you speak to a member of our team!

To take the quiz, just click on the following link:

What type of scientist am I?

type of scientist

Once you're finished, we'd love it if you shared your results with us using the #HRS hashtag! You can share it with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Engineering Jobs

Are you wondering how to get an engineering job? Engineering science is a multidisciplinary field within the ever-growing science industry. It involves the application of principles and facts regarding the different aspects of the physical and material world.

Engineering scientists specialise in different branches of this field, including chemical, environmental and biomedical principles. Not surprisingly, this fascinating industry is an area in which many people aspire to work.

Here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we specialise in finding the right job for the right person, so if you are a soon-to-be graduate or you’re looking for a change of job roles, here are a few tips on how to get an engineering job:

Tips for Getting an Engineering Job

Build your CV to suit an engineering job

Whether you’re still studying or you’re currently in full-time employment, try to gain some experience within the engineering science industry.

If you’ve already been working in the science industry, tailor your CV to focus on qualities that would suit an engineering job role. If you don’t have any suitable experience, try looking for some extra-curricular activities that could help.

If you’re still in university, many courses include a year-long placement that can lead directly to an engineering job. Choose your placement wisely and work as hard as possible. Even if you don’t get a permanent job at the end of it, this experience will look fantastic on your CV.

Speak to a careers advisor

If you have access to a careers advisor, whether that’s in university or in your local job centre, we strongly recommend that you speak to them before applying for an engineering job.

Career advisors will be able to help you find the right work experience placement and tailor your CV to suit the job you’re searching for. It is also advisable to speak to places like SEMTA, who will also supply you with help and advice on how to get an engineering job.

Here at HRS, we can help you achieve your ambitions with our bespoke recruitment service. We can help you to create the perfect CV for your ideal role. We’re committed to treating our candidates as individuals, not a commodity. If you need any help with your job search, we’re more than happy to help - you can contact us here.

Make each application personal

You may have heard this before, but a key factor in securing an engineering job is to make your application as well-suited as possible to the role you are applying for.

If you have the right qualifications and experience, you need to convey this properly within your CV. Don’t be the person who sends a CV with the wrong employer name or who writes about their general life experience rather than relevant activities.

For CV advice and tips, click here.

Don't give up

If you don’t hear back about your first couple of applications, don’t feel disheartened. This doesn’t mean you’re not suited to an engineering job; it may just mean that this was not the job for you.

That said, it's a good idea to take another look at your CV and see if there's anything that could be improved. Did you miss out some important information? Could you have tailored your cover letter better?

Some potential employers may even provide you with feedback if you ask nicely. If you get an interview and not the role, you should always ask for feedback - this will help you improve upon your failed application and hopefully put you on the right path towards your dream engineering science career.

Good luck!

Take a look at the latest engineering science jobs from Hyper Recruitment Solutions now, or click here to contact us about our services for job seekers.

How to Quit Your Job

People leave their jobs for all sorts of reasons - whether it's because of poor management, low morale, or simply feeling like it's time for a change. However, whatever the reason for your departure may be, it's important that you leave your job in a professional manner - it's never wise to burn bridges, especially if you want a good reference from your current employer!

Even if you're happy with your job, and you're leaving on good terms, resigning can be difficult. So, to make it a little easier for you, here are a few tips on how to quit your job gracefully:

Give Plenty of Notice

Most employment contracts state how much notice you must give when you live, and it's important that you abide by this as it gives your employer time to prepare for your departure. However, this may not always be the case; your employer doesn't have to accept the notice you give, and your employment could be terminated immediately.

Write a Resignation Letter

No matter how you feel when resigning, you must write a resignation letter. Writing a resignation letter will help you maintain a positive relationship with your employer while also making it easier for you to move on to your next job.

Keep your resignation letter simple, brief, and as positive as possible - there's no point criticising your employer if it was your choice to leave the company. Offer to help during the transition and afterwards within reason.

Ask for a Letter of Recommendation

Before you leave the company, it's a good ideas to ask for a letter of recommendation from your employer. A good reference from your former boss is important, as your future employment may on rely on this. It's important to get it in writing so you can keep it (unless there is an HR department that keeps a record of all references).

Check All Details & Return Company Property

Find out what benefits and salary you are entitled to receive upon leaving. Make sure you discussed your unused leave and sick pay, and whether you can cash in or roll over your pension plan. and whether you can cash in or roll over your pension plan. Also, if you have taken any property home from work, make sure you return it to your employer - the last thing you want to do is annoy your employer by stealing something that belongs to them.

Inform Your Workmates

Informing your workmates of your departure is important, as they may have to plan ahead to cover you in your absence. However, you should sort out all the details with your managers first, as they may want to inform the other staff themselves.

If you work in the science sector and you're thinking about leaving your job but don't have another job to go to, you may be interested in our recruitment services. Please click here to view our range of job opportunities.

Pharmeceutical Industry

Working in the pharmaceutical industry allows you to change people’s lives for the better.

The pharmaceutical industry works to improve many people’s lives by researching, developing, making and marketing medicines. This industry is home to a varied range of incredibly rewarding jobs.

Here are a few reasons why you should consider working in the pharmaceutical industry.

The pharmaceutical industry is continuously growing

The pharmaceutical industry currently employs around 736,358 people in Europe and more than 854,000 in the United States, according to the IFPMA. It is thought that there are around 70,000 pharmaceutical jobs based in the UK alone.

This is a growing industry, and the number of jobs in the pharmaceutical industry is expected to continue rising. If you choose to work in pharmaceuticals, you will not have to worry about the industry becoming redundant.

Pharmaceutical companies employ people from different educational backgrounds

As the pharmaceutical industry is so large, it is able to take on and train up individuals with a variety of education levels. From training those with GCSEs as apprentices to funding research for those with PhDs or equivalent, the pharmaceutical industry offers something for everyone.

Employees who work for pharmaceutical companies very often receive training and gain experience with new processes and technologies. This in itself is another reason you should consider working in the pharmaceutical industry.

The pharmaceutical industry generally pays more than other industries

Every job within the pharmaceutical industry requires a high level of motivation and competence. It is a demanding industry in which hard work is handsomely rewarded, so your pay will be more than enough to put a smile on your face.

According to recent market analysis, the average pharmaceutical job pays £37,500 a year. This varies substantially across the different jobs within the field. For example, the Marketing and Advertising Sector pays around £62,500 on average, whereas a secretary will still get a good salary of around £25,000.

It is an industry which never stands still

If you’re thinking about changing jobs because your current role has become monotonous, the pharmaceutical industry will change everything for you. There are very few boring jobs in pharmaceuticals, and the industry is always looking for dynamic new recruits who want to achieve great things.

If you choose a career in pharmaceuticals, you will constantly be a part of new breakthroughs and developments in the industry.

The pharmaceutical industry covers a huge range of jobs and roles, so you will have your pick of working environments. With constant room for career development and individual growth, there’s never a dull day in the pharmaceutical industry.

Have we persuaded you that you should work in pharmaceuticals? If so, click here to browse the latest pharmaceutical vacancies from Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

What to Wear to a Job Interview

Job interviews are all about making a good first impression, and nothing makes or breaks a first impression like how you're dressed. When a potential employer invites you to an interview, you should immediately start thinking about what to wear - what is the right outfit for this interview?

To some extent, of course, the answer to that question will depend on what sort of job you're interviewing for, but it's always important to look neat and professional. Even if you're hoping to land a role at a trendy tech start-up where all the employees wear T-shirts and jeans, it pays to look smart for the interview.

With that in mind, here - courtesy of the team here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions - are some top tips to help you get dressed for that career-making job interview:

  • First of all, be prepared. Don't wait until the day of the interview to select your outfit (especially if you're indecisive - showing up late won't look good regardless of what you're wearing!). Pick your clothes a few days in advance, and get them out of wardrobe to check that they're clean and crease-free. Leave yourself plenty of time to do laundry and ironing, just in case.

  • Don't dress too outrageously. Novelty ties, plunging necklines, garishly bright colours...a good interview outfit avoids all of these things. You want the interviewer to remember you for your articulate and intelligent answers, not for your red polka-dot shirt or your skimpy dress.

  • Be moderate with make-up, jewellery and scents. A drop of cologne or a touch of make-up? No problem. But you're not going on a date or hitting the clubs - you're applying for a job, so there's no need to do yourself up too extravagantly.

  • You're not there to show off your fashion sense. By all means wear nice, modern-looking clothes - you don't want to look like you've stepped through a portal from the 1970s. But unless you're interviewing for a post at some glossy magazine, your clothes shouldn't be trying to persuade the interviewer of your smashing fashion sense. Make a good impression by looking tidy and together, not by dressing for the catwalk.

  • Check your hair. Like clothing, hair can have a very powerful impact on what people think when they meet you for the first time. Your hairdo should be as neat and tidy as your outfit, so spend a little time sorting it out before you set off for the interview (and don't be afraid to go for a trim if you need it).

  • It's better to be overdressed than underdressed. It's an enormously clichéd piece of advice to offer, but 'dress for the job you want, not the job you have' is a good saying to bear in mind when pondering what to wear to a job interview. Most employers will expect interviewees to look reasonably smart even if they allow their employees to dress casually, and if in doubt, it's always safer to dress formally. In the vast majority of cases, business attire will make a far better impression than the clothes you wear around the house.

If you need more interview preparation tips, be sure to visit our Interview Advice page!

Still looking for your dream job? Browse the latest science and technology vacancies here.

Image courtesy of pixabay.com