Bending or outright breaking the truth on your CV can be very tempting – after all, the science jobs market is intensely competitive. Nor is it exactly uncommon for people to lie on their CV, with some 38% of Britons having done it at least once, according to data referenced by Metro.

However, none of this means that being economical with the truth on your CV is actually a good idea. Here are just some of the reasons why you should think again.

The truth is often easy to find

We are in the Internet age, and it has never been easier for employers to do their own research into the various claims you make on your CV.

It may be easy to think that a ‘little white lie’ here or there will be glossed over. However, all that it takes for your credibility to be ruined is an employer discovering a mismatch between what your CV states and what is on your LinkedIn profile or elsewhere online.

As the saying goes, nothing ever completely disappears from the Internet, and traces of your employment history may be left online to trip you up in your career ambitions.

You might be ‘found out’ on the job 

Even if you secure the role with the help of a lie about something you claimed to be proficient in, the likelihood is that at some point, you will need to back up that claim.

This can lead to an incredibly awkward situation as you unsuccessfully attempt to ‘fake’ skills or experience that you don’t have, potentially ending in humiliation as you are forced to admit to the lie.

Avoiding the lie in the first place is an infinitely better idea. If there is a certain skill or qualification that you wish you had, it’s better to work towards this and mention it on your CV, than to be anything less than absolutely truthful.

It could ruin your reputation

A reputation for integrity and honesty can be so hard to earn, and so easily lost. What’s more, the adverse impact can extend well beyond you being unable to secure a specific job.

Your reputation, after all, is hugely important when you are seeking any job, and if employers have any reason to question your ethics and integrity, they may wonder what else you may lie about on the job, which could imperil their entire company’s reputation.

News of your deceitfulness can quickly spread online and between different companies in your sector – so don’t take the risk.

You could lose your job

If there’s anything worse than not getting your dream job, it is surely getting that job, only to lose it because of a lie you told.

Employers don’t take lying lightly, and you could very easily find yourself back in the dole queue if any lie of yours is discovered. In the most severe cases – such as if the job legally required you to have a particular qualification that you lied about having – you could even face legal action.

Yes, many very successful people have lied on their CVs – ranging from former Yahoo chief executive Scott Thompson to media tycoon David Geffen – but that doesn’t mean you should follow their examples, especially when – as The Telegraph explains – their misdeeds so often ended badly.

Don’t put yourself in the awkward position of having something to hide – instead, tell the truth on your CV for the ultimate peace of mind. Remember that here at leading science recruitment agency Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we can advise you on how to construct a winning CV that won’t leave you feeling the need to be untruthful in the first place. 

Chemical engineering is in many ways the archetypal science job, even involving the traditional white coat and laboratory work. However, it is also a very stimulating field in general, Samantha Tyson of the Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE) having described it in The Guardian as “all about turning raw materials into useful, everyday products.”

Qualified chemical engineers can also look forward to decent remuneration – a recent IChemE salary survey having found that starting wages are in the region of £29,500.

More experienced chartered chemical engineers can expect to earn as much as £70,000, with work in certain industries such as oil and contracting potentially commanding even higher amounts. But how can you become a chemical engineer in the first place?

As with other science jobs, you need the right characteristics

Don’t be fooled too much by the ‘chemical’ bit of this particular job title – if you wish to become a chemical engineer, you will need to have strong mathematical ability. Maths, physics and chemistry are the most common A-levels taken by chemical engineering students, according to Tyson.  

But you will also need many other, often more general skills and attributes to secure a chemical engineering job. These range from project and resource management skills and oral and written communication skills to analytical and problem-solving ability and the ability to work as part of a team.

Graduates seeking these particular science jobs will also be expected to possess strong IT skills, commercial and business awareness and the capacity to motivate and lead a team.

What qualifications will you require? 

You shouldn’t normally be able to secure a chemical engineer role unless you have a BEng degree or a BTEC HNC or HND in chemical or process engineering. Admission to a chemical engineering degree course generally depends on you having at least five GCSEs graded between A and C, as well as two A-levels including maths and a science subject.

If you lack maths and science qualifications, some universities offer a foundation year to help get you up to speed. As always, you should double-check the exact entry requirements with individual colleges.

It can be advantageous for those wishing to build an especially lucrative career in chemical engineering to also possess a Masters degree (MEng) in addition to a first degree in chemical engineering. Those with a degree in a different branch of engineering or a related subject such as chemistry or polymer science may opt to take an MSc postgraduate degree in chemical or process engineering to boost their chances.  

Chemical engineering is an extremely diverse field of work

It’s difficult to sum up everything that chemical engineers do in just a few lines. Depending on the exact role and sector in which you work, you may find yourself designing plant and equipment configuration, setting up scale-up and scale-down processes, assessing options for plant expansion, applying new technologies and researching new products, among an incredibly wide range of other potential duties.

There are plenty of opportunities for progression too, which according to the National Careers Service, include progressing to a senior process or design engineer, research and development manager role or becoming a plant manager or overall operations manager. Consultancy work is another option.

Remember that Hyper Recruitment Solutions is a leading science recruitment agency serving those on the lookout for all manner of engineering roles, including process or chemical engineering. Simply click through to learn more about our in-depth expertise in this area

Relationships - both personal and professional - are a fact of life, and if you wish to make the swiftest progress up the science career ladder, you will almost certainly need to cultivate harmonious relationships with those of relevance to your chosen sector. 

Of course, we serve those seeking roles in any of a broad range of science sectors here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, from biotechnology and pharmacology to energy and medical devices.

But in a world in which - according to one study shared on LinkedIn - as many as 85% of jobs are filled via networking, there are undoubted benefits to expanding your range of science-related contacts beyond simply signing up with a leading recruitment agency.

Here are some tips on how to do it.

Focus on quality, not just quantity

It's easy for many people attracted to the mystique of networking to think it's about little more than building a long list of contacts. However, what really matters is the quality of those contacts and how well connected you are to them. 

The best contacts aren't just those who have heard a rumour about a job opening at X company or Y company, or any other random person. Instead, they're the people who can give you useful and current information and additional relevant contacts. They are likely to be able to give you informed advice, in addition to meaningful assistance with your applications for science jobs.

But think, too, about how tight and personal the bond is with the most potentially useful contacts you already have. Do you know their name, job title and specific areas of interest? What about their educational history or family?

If you can get in phone contact with that contact and receive a positive, receptive response to whatever you ask them, they are a useful contact. Otherwise, they are simply one more name in your database.

Treat contacts with respect

Do you treat your contacts as potential allies - people who you listen to and who you can help with their own pain points, rather than merely people who can give you what they want? Your message to your contacts should be that you value them highly and - ideally - want to support and help them.

After all, showing respect to your contacts will maximise the likelihood that they respond in kind.

Part of this process should be being clear about what you want from that contact before approaching them, so that you do not waste their - or your - time. What kind of science job are you looking for, and what kind of boss are you seeking? Is this a person who is likely to help you, given your answers to the aforementioned questions?

Be patient and appreciative

Cultivating a contacts list that will actually help you to secure that longed-for science job will require a lot of patience and appreciation. Make sure you express your gratitude by personally thanking those who give you any form of help with your job search, and don't forget to 'check in' periodically and attempt to reciprocate with your own assistance, if you can.

According to one recent survey of US adults by Pew Research Center, 66% used connections with close friends or family in their most recent job search, while 63% used professional or work connections and 55% used acquaintances or friends of friends.

Clearly, then, networking looks unlikely to become any less important in the job search process any time soon. So, why not create what may prove to be one of your most crucial contacts of all, by making use of our considerable expertise in any of a vast range of science industries here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions?


Today’s employers don’t exactly lack appreciation of the need for employee engagement – 48% of respondents to one recent Deloitte survey cited it as “very important”. However, a 2015 report from Red Letter Days for Business stated that only just over a third of employees in Britain – 36% - were “highly engaged”.

Perhaps part of the problem stopping many organisations both within and outside the science sectors from boosting the engagement levels of their employees is an inability to recognise such engagement in the first place.

Here are some of the common signs of a lack of engagement – as well as of high levels of engagement – in your staff.  

Signs of a disengaged employee

Where do we start with all of the ways to spot a disengaged employee? You may notice that they only do a bare minimum amount and standard of work, completing assignments in a manner that is sloppy or only just “good enough”. It suggests an employee who isn’t much interested in the consequences of such low standards for them or their company.

A worker with poor levels of engagement may also avoid involvement in team activities, although it is important here not to confuse an apparent lack of interest with a tendency towards introversion. Some of your staff members are likely to prefer working quietly on their own, which is fine, but showing a complete lack of support to colleagues or disgruntlement when asked to participate in group initiatives is a different matter.  

A disengaged employee is also much more likely to complain about their work and blame others for their mistakes. It is vital here to consider potentially legitimate grievances, such as your employee being overworked or not being allowed by the culture of your company to make errors. By encouraging your employees to admit honest mistakes instead of shaming them for occasionally getting things wrong, you can make them less fearful and help to boost their engagement and performance levels.

So, how do you know you have an engaged worker?

A truly engaged employee is, of course, the opposite of many of these characteristics. They are employees who take the initiative instead of doing the bare minimum, motivate instead of complain, and easily concentrate on their tasks instead of losing focus.

Such an employee is also likely to own up to their mistakes out of a wish to learn from them, collaborate with their co-workers and love their company instead of looking for a new role elsewhere.

With Millennials especially inclined to ‘job hop’ – two in three of them signalling a wish to leave their present employment by 2020, according to the 2016 Deloitte Millennial Survey – bolstering employee engagement to cultivate employee loyalty will only become all the more crucial for science employers in the years ahead.

Talk to us about your talent sourcing challenges

As all of the above indicates, recruiting staff who represent a good fit for your science organisation’s culture isn’t all that you have to do to ensure high levels of engagement. However, it could certainly have a role in the prevention and mitigation of employee retention headaches in the years to come.

Whether your firm is involved in the pharmaceutical, engineering, medical device or any other science or technology sector, and whatever your other specialised talent sourcing requirements may be, our bespoke staffing solutions help to ensure you have the best possible employees adding value to your business. Make Hyper Recruitment Solutions your dependable science recruitment partner. 

The latest statistics point to a job market that saw steady rather than spectacular progress in 2016. The Office for National Statistics’ recently released UK labour market report shows that there were 31.8 million people in work as of September to November last year, an improvement by 294,000 on a year earlier.

However, time invariably marches on, with many candidates for science jobs and their potential employers now turning their attentions firmly to 2017. What are some of the trends that will likely define the science recruitment market in the year ahead?

1.    A culture of engagement

As the CIPD’s Employee Outlook report for autumn 2016 has stated, while the UK’s net job satisfaction has improved since spring 2016 – now sitting at +40 – this is still some way short of the +48 recorded for autumn 2015.

As a result, it’s fair to say that most science organisations could probably improve their engagement strategies, which looks likely to be a key focus in the coming 12 months. More engaged employees will be more effective brand ambassadors, which will significantly aid your recruitment drive.

2.    The continued primacy of mobile

According to Pew Research Center, 28% of all Americans have used a smartphone to search for a job, rising to 53% of those aged between 18 and 29 – and you can bet that similar trends are continuing to hold sway on this side of the Atlantic.

It therefore couldn’t be more important to continue the optimisation of your science organisation’s online presence for mobile users. If potential candidates visit your site via their smartphone or tablet and find it inaccessible, slow-loading or difficult to navigate, they are unlikely to remain for long.

3.     Workplace diversity remains crucial

The benefits of more diverse workforces are well-documented, but nonetheless bear repeating. Firms with greater diversity in their personnel are more adaptable, can offer a broader range of skills and experiences and deliver better overall results.  

Management consultancy McKinsey & Company, for example, found that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity were 15% more likely to financially outperform those in the bottom quartile . For ethnic diversity, the figure was 35%. 

4.     Treating the candidate like a customer

That term that has been mentioned so often in recruitment circles in the last few years – ‘candidate experience’ – certainly won’t go away in 2017. In fact, science employers will need to make even more of an effort to make candidates feel as pampered as a customer, throughout the recruitment process, if they are to lure the biggest talent.

With Millennial and Generation Z jobseekers notoriously impatient compared to those before them, more emphasis is set to be placed on a swift and efficient candidate experience than ever before.

5.     Centring an employer brand around the employee

With so many avenues through which disgruntled (or for that matter, contented) current or former employees of your organisation can voice their true opinions of what it is like to work for your firm, it is becoming even harder to preserve a certain image of your organisation without your employees’ cooperation.

2017 will therefore be a year in which you need to be more alert than ever to manage your employer brand, in large part by cultivating the best possible working environment.

Are you a science employer looking to work with experts in such sectors as biotechnology, pharmacology and medical devices to secure the talent that your firm needs in the 12 months ahead? Talk to Hyper Recruitment Solutions about the wide-ranging, specialised and informed recruitment solutions on which we have built our reputation. 

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