Work Experience

What do you need in order to land your dream job? One word: experience.

Recent studies show that two thirds of employers seek graduates with relevant work experience, as this better prepares them for working life and helps to develop their general business acumen. Additionally, one third of employers reportedly feel that job applicants do not possess enough knowledge about their chosen career.

But developing your business skills and career knowledge isn't the only reason why work experience is important. There are several other advantages the you can gain from getting a taste of working life before seeking a permanent role.

Why work experience is important:

  1. Exploring your options - If, like many people, you are not yet sure what career path you'd like to take, work experience provides a great opportunity for you to see what it's like to work within a certain industry. This can be a deciding factor in the role you eventually choose for yourself.

  2. Displaying your enthusiasm - If you already know what career you'd like to pursue, gaining work experience within your chosen field will demonstrate your passion and interest to potential employers when you send them your CV. Employers like to hire individuals who want to work for them because they're genuinely interested in the role, not just because they need the money. Gaining work experience in your preferred industry will show a high level of commitment, which can increase your chance of future success.

  3. Identifying your strengths and weaknesses - Work experience can be a great teacher. While working within a real-life work setting, you'll have the opportunity to assess your abilities more clearly. Skills that you developed in school and university can be put into practice; you'll also be able to learn what skills you do not possess, and perhaps begin working to develop them.

  4. Networking - Work experience will give you many options to network. You'll get to know a number of potentially useful contacts, and they'll get to find out what you have to offer. Even at this early stage of your career, networking can provide benefits that will last throughout your working life.

  5. Discovering opportunities - Frequently, employers who take on individuals for work experience end up offering those individuals permanent positions within the same organisation. Neither employer nor worker can really know how well the candidate is going to perform prior to the beginning of the placement, but after some time, the employer may realise that the worker can bring lasting benefits to the company. This is particularly common among undergraduate students whose courses include a placement year; once the placement is finished and the student has gained a considerable amount of knowledge, their employer will often offer a full-time role for after graduation.

As you can see, work experience comes with a number of important benefits, all of which can help you to secure your dream job.

If you are interested in working with the science industry. Hyper Recruitment Solutions can help you to take the next step in your career. We work with the biggest and best organisations in the UK science industry, helping talented individuals to fill vital roles and drive the sector forward. Click the link below to see a full list of current vacancies.

Browse Science Jobs >

The global recruitment industry is worth more than £300 billion - no wonder so many people want to become recruitment consultants!

But what does a recruitment consultant actually do? And what does it take to become one? Obviously, we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions know everything there is to know about this field, so let's answer those two questions now.

Overview

A recruitment consultant's main role is to match suitable candidates to temporary or permanent positions within client organisations. Recruitment consultants work hard to build positive relationships with companies in order to develop a deep understanding of their hiring needs - this helps us to find the right candidates to fill our clients' vacancies.

After identifying the right candidate for a role, the recruiter will conduct interviews, perform background checks, and ensure that both candidate and employer are a good fit for one another. Recruitment consultants also provide advice to both parties regarding training, salary, and career progression.

Responsibilities

As a recruitment consultant, you act as the crucial link between client companies and potential candidates. A recruiter's responsibilities are therefore varied and challenging. Here are just a few of them:

  • Using various marketing, networking, and business development techniques to attract attention from client companies

  • Identifying and approaching potential candidates

  • Preparing correspondence and documents (such as CVs and references) to send to clients

  • Meeting targets related to the number of candidates placed in suitable roles

  • Revising recruitment practices to ensure effectiveness in selection techniques and recruitment programmes

Qualifications

Recruitment consultancy roles are often available to all graduates, regardless of subject area (although of course it helps if your degree matches the area in which you would like to recruit - e.g. a science degree may make you more attractive to scientific recruitment agencies).

Rather than looking for specific qualifications or achievements, employers within the recruitment industry tend to use personal ability, skill, and charisma as measures of suitability.

Skills & Abilities

A good recruitment consultant should possess the following skills:

  • Creativity
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Sales and negotiation skills
  • Ability to meet targets / deadlines
  • Excellent communication / people skills
  • Exceptional time management
  • Drive and determination

Salary & Working Environment

The average salary for a recruitment consultant is in the range of £22,000 to £28,000 a year, although those in senior positions can earn in excess of £40k per year. Many employers offer some sort of performance-related bonus (even for inexperienced employees) on top of a basic pay package - these bonuses can be set on an individual, team or company-wide basis. A number of other benefits - such as mobile devices, laptops, company cars, social events, and end-of-year rewards - may also be available.

A recruitment consultant's typical working day usually runs from 9am to 5pm, although overtime is not unusual. It is possible to work as a freelance recruitment consultant, but generally not without expert knowledge of a specific field.

Flexible working and career breaks are available within this industry, but are uncommon as a result of the role's very active nature. Work is often based within an office setting, but travelling and outside work are common as a result of regular interviews and meetings.

Would you like to work for Hyper Recruitment Solutions? Use the link below to find out how!

Careers at HRS >

HRS Founder Ricky Martin

On the 11th October 2018, we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions held our annual networking event at the Royal Society of Chemistry in London. We brought together 120 of our associates from the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors to discuss the changes we can expect to see in quality and regulatory systems following Brexit.

On arrival, guests were given the chance to network and get to know each other. HRS founder Ricky Martin then addressed the room, welcoming the guests and outlining the purpose of the event: to acknowledge, predict and discuss changes that professionals in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries can expect before and after the UK's exit from the European Union next year.

Our host for the evening was media entrepreneur Mike Soutar, who interviewed Ricky when he was a contestant on The Apprentice - Mike did a great job of warming up the crowd with his recollections of this experience!

Our other speakers on the night were:

  • Toby Underwood (RSC Accreditation and Careers Manager)
  • John Johnson (VP of NSF Health Sciences)
  • Bob Clay (2017 TOPRA President & Managing Director of Highbury Regulatory Science)

The keynote speeches from John Johnston and Bob Clay were followed by a Q&A, during which John, Bob and Ricky took questions from attendees.

HRS Networking Event

Key Takeaways from the Event

  • After initial discussion about the uncertainty that Brexit has brought to the sector, the room agreed that the pharma / biotech industries make life-saving medicines, and that this must and will continue. Ensuring this will require agility in our processes and positivity in our mindset.

  • Despite changes in the EMA, the UK will remain a hub for pharma / biotech talent and this should be celebrated. We cannot be so negative as to put people off the sector.

  • To support the future of the sector, we will all need to do more within our own 'outreach' programmes to inspire the next wave of STEM talent to join the sector (via schools, colleges, universities, etc).

  • Companies that are being more proactive and open to change from a quality / regulatory perspective will be in a better position post-March 2019.

As you'd expect from such an illustrious industry event, attendees had plenty of time to network at the beginning and end of the evening, and when we took a survey of those who were there, the responses were very positive indeed:

  • 97% of attendees rated the event as either 'excellent' or 'very good' overall

  • 90% of attendees rated the speakers as either 'excellent' or 'very good'

  • 90% of attendees said they would be 'extremely likely' to attend a similar HRS networking event in the future

Ricky ended the event with a positive message about everybody taking responsibility for acting as brand ambassadors for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. We must ensure that we continue to seek opportunities off the back of Brexit (as opposed to being consumed by the negatives), and remember that the sector saves lives and will continue to do so.

HRS will be running more science events in the near future to help improve knowledge and stimulate debate in areas of real interest. If you would like to be considered to speak at such an event, or if you would like to suggest a topic of interest, please contact events@hyperec.com so that we can continue to deliver relevant, useful support in a sales-free environment.

Who are Hyper Recruitment Solutions?

Finding a Job Overseas

Are you thinking about working abroad? There are lots of reasons to move to another country, but regardless of why you're relocating, you'll probably need to find a job when you get there.

Here are some important things to consider when you're trying to find a job overseas:

Where do you want to go?

If you know which country you'd like to work in, you should begin your job hunt by gauging what sort of jobs are available in that territory. Lots of recruitment agencies (including Hyper Recruitment Solutions) feature both local and international job listings, so these companies' websites can be a good place to start.

Do you need a visa?

It's important to know whether you are eligible to work in your chosen country. Generally speaking, UK citizens will need a visa to work in non-EU countries, but you shouldn't need one to work within other EU member states (note that this may change depending on how Brexit negotiations progress).

You will need to have a rough idea of how long you intend to stay in your chosen country, as this may affect the type and volume of paperwork you have to complete.

Localise your CV

Once you've got an idea of the work that's available and the documentation you'll need to work in your chosen country, you can begin to investigate the local employment protocol. This might require you to adjust your CV - in some places you will be expected to include a picture, while others may require you to disclose your age, etc.

Other challenges you might face:

  • Language Barrier - Be prepared to stumble through some awkward conversations if you're not fluent in your new home's primary language.

  • Homesickness - It's normal to miss home after relocating, but don't worry. You'll meet lots of new and interesting friends before you know it!

Working abroad can be an invaluable asset to your career - it builds confidence, and you'll experience things that you never would have encountered at home. Browse HRS job listings and apply online >

Image from pexels.com

Finding a job while pregnant

Trying to find a job while you're expecting a baby can make what is already a fairly stressful time very trying indeed. However, there's no reason why you can't secure a new role during this exciting period of your life - here's some expert advice that we hope will make the job-hunting process as easy possible:

Do I have to disclose that I'm pregnant?

Potential employers are not allowed to ask whether you're planning to have a baby when deciding whether or not to hire you (and if you choose to inform them of your pregnancy, this cannot affect their final decision). According to UK law, you must be given the same consideration as a candidate who is not pregnant.

What should I look for in a new job?

You need to carefully consider how your situation is going to change over the course of your pregnancy and beyond. Important logistical questions include:

  • How flexible are the hours?
  • How will you get to work, and how long will the journey take?
  • Will you need childcare after the baby arrives, and will it be available near your place of work?
If at all possible, you don't want your new job to add too much extra stress to your life at this busy time.

Will I be entitled to parental leave?

Yes - if you are giving birth, you are legally entitled to 26 weeks of statutory leave, regardless of how long you've been in your job or how much you get paid. Whether your employer offers any further maternity leave after this will depend on the company's own policies.

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