Woman working in recruitment

The recruitment industry is often depicted as being an exciting vocational specialism that blends people skills with sales acumen in one HR-centric profession.

Charged with attracting and sourcing the right candidates for the roles available, relationship building is key, both internally and externally, while understanding the needs of both client and candidate is paramount.

With social interactions and travel a key part of the role, it’s no surprise that jobs in recruitment can be highly sought-after. However, while that may be the dream ticket to some, to others, it may also seem a little daunting.

For those considering a career in recruitment, this blog aims to help paint a bigger picture, providing additional details and a peek behind the curtain at what life is like working in recruitment.

 

Working in Recruitment: Pros and Cons

It’s fair to say that recruitment is a fast-paced industry that covers a lot of ground. To help you gain a well-rounded view of the profession and work out if it’s the right career for you, we’ve outlined some of the pros and cons below.

 

Benefits of Working in Recruitment

The recruitment industry can be a hugely rewarding endeavour, boasting a myriad of perks, incentives and upsides. Here are a few great reasons to consider pursuing a career in recruitment.

 

No Strict Entry Requirements

Unlike an academic profession, you don’t need any specific qualification to pursue a career in the recruitment industry.

While a degree or relevant experience may be advantageous, recruitment jobs don’t involve any formal prerequisites, providing an attractive proposition for a variety of backgrounds.

The non-discriminatory aspect of a recruitment career means it can be just as suitable for a school-leaver as it is a veteran worker looking for a career change.

Provided you boast the necessary sales ability and people skills, along with a healthy drive and ambition for the task at hand, a degree can be completely irrelevant and largely unnecessary.

 

Great Salaries and Scope for Progression

For many candidates, career progression is an important part of working life and developmental prospects can be the difference between taking a role and going elsewhere.

The opportunity to progress professionally is one of the key USPs of recruitment. If you put the work in, you could advance up the ladder in no time.

With that progression naturally comes financial incentive and higher salaries. While this can vary from one agency to the next, the financial rewards can be great.

Trainees typically start at £15-20k, while consultants commonly earn between £22 and 28k/annum. As you progress up the food chain, senior positions and management roles can habitually break the £40k barrier.

Meanwhile, many roles will also offer commission-based salaries with OTE (on-target earnings) in excess of their baseline salary, providing the incentive to work hard and achieve for virtually limitless earning potential.

Additionally, other perks – such as a company car, phone or laptop – can often come included as you advance to more senior roles, while company training and healthy pension schemes are also commonplace.

 

Excitement and Variety

A key selling point of recruitment as an attractive profession has long been its status as an exciting field. A lot of this excitement can be attributed to the variety involved in a typical working day.

From sourcing candidates and arranging interviews through to continued communication and negotiating offers of employment, recruitment can rarely be described as monotonous.

The travel opportunities that come with the job also be very attractive. Trips abroad, high-end lunches and team socials aren’t unusual occurrences in the recruitment industry.

Meanwhile, even client visitations can present a natural way of keeping the working environment fresh and stimulating, providing a welcome change of scenery from the office setting.

Additionally, a career in recruitment can also be extremely rewarding and fulfilling. While the work can be challenging at times, delivering potentially life-changing, positive news to a candidate can be a natural mood-booster.

 

Negatives of Working in Recruitment

Like any industry, recruitment isn’t all rainbows and butterflies. Naturally, there are going to be professional challenges in any vocation and a job in recruitment is no different.

The daily challenges, while rewarding, can also be challenging and necessitate long hours in pursuit of achieving a positive end result. Meanwhile, roles that rely heavily on commission and performance-based incentives can also bring with them a high degree of stress, particularly for workers unfamiliar with high-pressure working environment.

Meanwhile, the positive aspect of social interaction can also just as quickly take a negative turn when it comes to delivering bad news; for example, informing a candidate that they have been unsuccessful following an interview.

 

"Should I Work in Recruitment?"

When it comes to determining if recruitment is the right industry for you, a lot of it can depend on the individual and their personality. A role in recruitment can be the perfect career for one person, while it may be totally the wrong path for someone else.

For example, introverts that enjoy a set routine and a rigidly structured approach to the working day may not translate as well to a recruitment role as a socialite with the gift of the gab who thrives on a varied, fast-paced environment.

Luckily, recruitment is also an industry that is very much sink or swim. Whether you take to it like a duck to water or flounder unceremoniously, it won’t take you long to find out if it’s the right sector for you.

That being said, the benefits can far outweigh the drawbacks for the right candidate and the risk can be well worth the reward. As such, a “no guts, no glory” mentality could pay off big time, while the alternative could leave you forever wondering “what could have been”.

 

For more information on the benefits of working in recruitment and the ins and outs of life in the industry, why not drop us a line? Call now on 0203 225 5120 or get in touch online by clicking the button below.

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Workplace diversity

If you happen to work in HR, diversity in the workplace is probably a very familiar topic. It’s a legal obligation that’s seen growing visibility over the last two decades.

However, diversity isn’t just a matter for Human Resources. Diversity in the workplace has a profound influence on every part of the working process, from social interaction to quality of work.

A diverse workforce can provide better results in terms of creativity, problem-solving and decision-making, generally resulting in a more productive environment all round. After all, a toolbox full of hammers won’t do much good when it comes to changing a light bulb.

 

Diversity Hiring Laws

The Equality Act 2010 protects people from discrimination in the workplace, theoretically providing a basis that ensures nobody’s personal background or characteristics affect their right to work.

However, according to the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), “an effective diversity and inclusion strategy goes beyond legal compliance”, and appropriate steps must be taken to ensure a varied working environment.

As such, knowing how to hire more diverse employees while staying safely within the boundaries of diversity hiring laws is a must for any company. Failure to do so could land your business in hot water.

Luckily, we’ve got a few helpful suggestions that will allow you to broaden your field of applicants instantly, helping you achieve a multicultural, multi-talented workforce across the age spectrum.

 

How to Hire More Diverse Employees

While specifically targeting a particular group can lead to accusations of discrimination, ensuring that your recruitment strategy is free from any involuntary prejudice can be a fantastic way to fairly and efficiently level the playing field for everyone.

Here are three effective diversity recruiting strategies that will help you to achieve a balanced response from all manner of candidates, ensuring your field of applicants is as diverse as possible.

 

Requested Info

Whether you consciously realise it or not, the information you collect via job application forms can have a dramatic effect on your perception of each applicant.

Information such as gender and nationality can subconsciously affect your expectations of a candidate and influence your response accordingly. Even names can trigger such biases; anonymous job applications have gained a lot of of traction in recent years as a means of eradicating this issue.

While this may seem a little extreme, there are simple steps that can be taken that garner similar results. To nip this issue in the bud, simply avoid asking for information such as gender, date of birth and nationality within your application forms.

That way, you can completely avoid direct or indirect discrimination by simply not knowing these characteristics, basing your judgement exclusively on the merit of the candidates in question.

 

Tell-Tale Wording

It’s also important to note that the inclusion of certain words in a candidate specification can also give skewed results. As such, it’s important to take care when penning your job descriptions to avoid a slanted verbiage.

For example, requesting “recent graduates” is likely to return applicants in their early to mid-20s, while requesting “experienced candidates” or requiring a minimum of X years’ experience is likely to discourage applicants below a certain age.

While there are always exceptions to these rules, avoiding such potholes could help you to appeal to a wider mix of applicants.

 

Favoured Parties

Though potentially more controversial than the above steps, favouring one party over another in order to achieve a greater balance in the workplace is undoubtedly an effective way to combat the issue of discrimination.

However, this tactic can spark debate, and may be perceived by some as discriminatory in itself.

This approach has drawn criticism from some corners over the years as it does - somewhat ironically - exclude certain parties in order to give more opportunities to a specific group. Nevertheless, it is a legal technique and one that is promoted by the government itself.

According to gov.uk, as an employer, you are allowed to favour a candidate with “protected characteristics” over one without if you feel the former is underrepresented in your workplace / industry. The only proviso is that both candidates must be equally matched in terms of suitability for the role.

 

Challenges of Diversity in the Workplace

While it’s important to have a fair and unbiased recruitment process, recruiting a candidate for the specific purpose of “ticking a box” can be counterproductive for all parties and can foster workplace resentment, as well as potentially reducing the overall quality of the work produced.

For example, hiring an ineffective communicator for a role that predominantly involves communication will likely result in a negative outcome for the company, the customer and the team, which can in turn be demoralising for the worker themselves.

Being fair without inadvertently discriminating against any party is a key part of creating an equal process. If you base your search purely on merit, you should bag yourself a diverse workplace by proxy, and this will ultimately achieve the best results for your business.

Read More: Inappropriate Interview Questions >>

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Choosing a new employee to join your company is no easy task. Nowadays, a single job advert can receive in excess of 100 applications. With potentially hundreds of CVs to read and a diverse range of people to choose from, hiring the right candidate takes time, patience and careful consideration.

If you get it right, you could be welcoming an inspiring, motivated and hard-working person into your company - someone who will breathe new life into the working environment.

Get it wrong, however, and not only have you wasted an eye-watering amount of money, you're also back where you started, with the same vacancy to fill again...

So, ensure you hire the right candidate first time by taking note of our hiring mistakes to avoid.

 

Not making the job description clear.

To find the perfect fit for a particular role, you need to explain in your job description exactly what your ideal candidate would be like. Job seekers aren't mind-readers, and they need to know exactly what's required of them so that they can decide whether they're the right fit for a job.

Being as clear as possible in the job description improves your chances of finding a candidate who ticks all the boxes.

 

Advertising in the wrong places.

Certain types of people look for jobs in certain types of places, so understand your demographic before you start advertising. If you need a graduate to fill a particular role, make sure your job is advertised on graduate-friendly websites. Similarly, for specialist roles (e.g. scientific jobs) seek the help of industry-specific recruitment specialists like us!

Putting your job in front of the right candidates is crucial if you want to find the right person for the job.

 

Not conducting phone interviews.

A five-minute phone call with a potential candidate can give you a far better insight into their personality than a CV can. How well can they handle the pressure of a phone call? Are they good at communicating? Are they friendly? These are all things that you can determine via a brief telephone conversation.

Phone interviews can save you and your candidates time and help you on your way to identifying the perfect candidate earlier in the hiring process.

We know that the hiring process can be arduous, but don't worry - HRS can offer you lots of expert advice that will help you choose the right candidate for the job first time.

Our Candidate Screening Process   Submit a Job Listing

Business relocation

Whether your business is in its infancy or a well-established enterprise, you may be considering business relocation as an opportunity to grow and expand (or indeed to downsize).

Business relocation can occur for a plethora of reasons, but one thing is certain: pursuing a fresh start in new premises is not a decision to be taken lightly.

Relocating a whole company is costly and causes disruptions, so choosing the right time to move your business - and doing it for the right reasons - is paramount.

 

Why relocate your business?

 

Moving to find better employees

One reason you might choose to relocate your business is to pursue staff with better qualifications and/or more experience.

If your business requires individuals with a very particular skill set (especially common in scientific professions), you might find that your current location just isn't suitable.

Many business owners relocate close to higher education institutions because they offer a surplus of well-educated graduates who are ready to seek employment.

 

Upgrading facilities

Another reason you might move your business is to make better facilities available to staff. If your workforce is growing and expanding, sheer lack of space can be a factor that influences your decision to relocate.

If you find that you can afford to upgrade your facilities (e.g. desks, toilets, parking) but have insufficient space for it in your current building, relocation may be a great option.

 

Downsizing

If your business is facing economic difficulties, or the location of your business is no longer lucrative, downsizing to smaller offices in a more economically-stable town or city might be just the fresh start your business needs to recover.

Whether you need to cut jobs or not, downsizing your business can increase your profit margins and allow you to move somewhere where demand for your product / service is at its highest.

 

Business Relocation Tips:

  • Plan ahead
  • Let loyal customers and vendors know well in advance
  • Update your contact details
  • Update your website and other online listings
  • Don't make a snap decision

If you're planning to relocate and you need to find new employees for your business, Hyper Recruitment Solutions can help!

Specialist Recruitment Solutions >>

Biochemistry is a  fascinating subject that teaches you about the fundamental building blocks of life. Because the subject is so broad, biochemistry jobs cover many sectors from forensics through to nanotechnology and beyond. 

If you've studied biochemistry at university, there are many biochemistry jobs that you'll be a good candidate for. Choosing the right biochemistry job for you is made easier if you have a rough idea of the area you want to work in. Hopefully, during the course of your studies, you have been inspired to specialise in a particular area that has sparked your interest. 

Let's take a look at some of the most popular biochemistry jobs to get an idea of what biochemistry job roles look like.

Pharmacologist

Working as a pharmacologist, your main goal is to investigate how drugs interact with biological systems. This can be a very rewarding job because you will be:

  • Discovering and creating new medicines
  • Exploring how the effects of certain drugs differ from person to person
  • Improving existing drugs so they are safer and more effective

Browse All Pharmaceutical Jobs Here >

Biotechnologist

In this role, you will study all aspects of cells and organisms to create new technology and products. As a biotechnologist, your main goal is to improve people's quality of life. With a biochemistry background, it's likely that, as a biotechnologist, you'll want to specialise in microbiology, forensics, and medicine. Things you'll be tasked with include:

  • Conducting experiments with living organisms
  • Research and data analysis
  • Maintaining and operating standard laboratory equipment

Browse All Biotechnology Jobs Here >

Clinical Research Associate 

If clinical trials have been the highlight of your biochemistry degree, then perhaps working as a Clinical Research Associate might be perfect for you. It's likely that you'll be testing clinical trials on drugs, their effectiveness and their safety. Other aspects of this role include:

  • Liaising with doctors and other investigators
  • Monitoring trials throughout their duration
  • Preparing written clinical reports for publication

Browse All Biotechnology Jobs Here >

 

Of course, this is just a small selection of the biochemistry jobs you can choose from, but we hope this gives you an overview of the kind of work biochemists can do.

To gain a better understanding of the different jobs that fall under the biochemistry umbrella, it's best to start looking at current job vacancies! By searching for 'biochemistry' on our 'find a job' page, you will be able to see a range of roles that fall under this category.

By reading real biochemistry job descriptionskey duties and responsibilities and role requirements, you will gain a much clearer understanding of the type of biochemistry job you want to/can apply for. 

Click Here to start your biochemistry job hunt today! If you have any questions about biochemistry jobs, job applications, or even writing your CV, don't hesitate to get in touch.

You can call us on +44 (0)239102980 or email us at info@hyperec.com.