Hyper Recruitment Solutions are delighted to announce that Managing Director, Ricky Martin has been elected as the Chair of the REC's Life Sciences CommitteeThe REC’s flagship Life Sciences sector group provides specialist support and advice to recruitment agencies working in a range of areas including pharmaceuticals, scientific research, biochemistry and biomedical technology.

After previously joining the committee as the Vice Chair, Ricky aims to further support the standards and professional in recruitment across the sciences. Moving forwards he aims to ensure there are more frequent communications on key topics surrounding the Life Sciences Sector to help further improve the standards across recruitment in this sector. 

The UK life Sciences sector generates a turnover of over £56 billion, is one of the strongest and most productive life sciences sectors in the world and employs over 160,000 people. It is therefore essential that we have a dedicated and specialist recruitment sector to support it. 

“Science saves lives! I intend to lead the committee, members and all life sciences recruiters in the UK, to ensure we do our best to support this. I look forward to working with you all. Please do not hesitate to reach out to me, should you ever need my support” Ricky Martin

About the REC

The Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) is the professional body for UK recruitment businesses. Established since 1930, representing 82% of the recruitment market place by value, the REC support their members by helping businesses find the people they need, while improving the standards and reputation of the recruitment industry. The REC lead the way in defining better recruitment standards and practice – this is imperative to building a world class jobs market. The REC work with recruiters that can make a real difference.

The latest statistics point to a job market that saw steady rather than spectacular progress in 2016. The Office for National Statistics’ recently released UK labour market report shows that there were 31.8 million people in work as of September to November last year, an improvement by 294,000 on a year earlier.

However, time invariably marches on, with many candidates for science jobs and their potential employers now turning their attentions firmly to 2017. What are some of the trends that will likely define the science recruitment market in the year ahead?

1.    A culture of engagement

As the CIPD’s Employee Outlook report for autumn 2016 has stated, while the UK’s net job satisfaction has improved since spring 2016 – now sitting at +40 – this is still some way short of the +48 recorded for autumn 2015.

As a result, it’s fair to say that most science organisations could probably improve their engagement strategies, which looks likely to be a key focus in the coming 12 months. More engaged employees will be more effective brand ambassadors, which will significantly aid your recruitment drive.

2.    The continued primacy of mobile

According to Pew Research Center, 28% of all Americans have used a smartphone to search for a job, rising to 53% of those aged between 18 and 29 – and you can bet that similar trends are continuing to hold sway on this side of the Atlantic.

It therefore couldn’t be more important to continue the optimisation of your science organisation’s online presence for mobile users. If potential candidates visit your site via their smartphone or tablet and find it inaccessible, slow-loading or difficult to navigate, they are unlikely to remain for long.

3.     Workplace diversity remains crucial

The benefits of more diverse workforces are well-documented, but nonetheless bear repeating. Firms with greater diversity in their personnel are more adaptable, can offer a broader range of skills and experiences and deliver better overall results.  

Management consultancy McKinsey & Company, for example, found that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity were 15% more likely to financially outperform those in the bottom quartile . For ethnic diversity, the figure was 35%. 

4.     Treating the candidate like a customer

That term that has been mentioned so often in recruitment circles in the last few years – ‘candidate experience’ – certainly won’t go away in 2017. In fact, science employers will need to make even more of an effort to make candidates feel as pampered as a customer, throughout the recruitment process, if they are to lure the biggest talent.

With Millennial and Generation Z jobseekers notoriously impatient compared to those before them, more emphasis is set to be placed on a swift and efficient candidate experience than ever before.

5.     Centring an employer brand around the employee

With so many avenues through which disgruntled (or for that matter, contented) current or former employees of your organisation can voice their true opinions of what it is like to work for your firm, it is becoming even harder to preserve a certain image of your organisation without your employees’ cooperation.

2017 will therefore be a year in which you need to be more alert than ever to manage your employer brand, in large part by cultivating the best possible working environment.

Are you a science employer looking to work with experts in such sectors as biotechnology, pharmacology and medical devices to secure the talent that your firm needs in the 12 months ahead? Talk to Hyper Recruitment Solutions about the wide-ranging, specialised and informed recruitment solutions on which we have built our reputation. 

Why Employees Quit

According to a survey by London Loves Business, almost half (49%) of UK workers signalled an intention to move jobs in 2016. With a percentage that large, it is inevitable that even those in the most rewarding science jobs will have occasionally considered quitting.

But why do employees quit? People decide to move on for all manner of reasons – so here are five of the things that you may be doing that could be contributing to your own firm’s staff attrition.


Micromanagement

Whatever science sector your organisation may be involved in –  pharmacology, clinical, medical devices or something entirely different – you won’t make your employees happy by continually micromanaging them. Undermining their ability is one of the reasons why employees quit. 

There’s a good reason why your staff are trained and experienced to such a high level – they need to be in order to do their jobs. You should give them the space to fulfil their duties.


A lack of the right tools

Another reason why employees quit is down to a material not emotional basis. For some science roles it may simply be standard office supplies that are required, whereas for others there may be a need for more specialised equipment.

Whatever the situation, your staff should have the tools that enable them to do their jobs in the safest and most competent manner possible.


Poor morale

Ultimately a business is not just about the company as a whole, but the individuals and the morale among employees. Unfortunately, far too many managers come across as intimidating, bad at communication and do not provide their staff with an adequate work/life balance. Poor management methods and low moral is one of the largest reasons why employees quit. 

Your employees need to feel that they are in an environment in which they will be appreciated and rewarded for their hard work. If they do not recieve this, don’t be surprised if they look for other science jobs.


Favouritism

Treating certain staff or departments more favourably than others – whether that means providing greater resources and attention or simply not placing the same demands upon them – is a quick method of breeding resentment.

All team members and departments should be treated equally and fairly in order to gain the most productive work environment. Feeling unappreciated is difficult for any team member and could lead to them quitting. 

Too many meetings

If your staff members are being constantly distracted from their core duties by meetings, how can you expect them to be productive and happy workers? At the very least, any meetings that you do hold should have a definite sense of purpose, with an expectation that real changes or improvements will be made as a result of what was discussed.

But all too often, some science organisations hold meetings for the sake of holding meetings and nothing changes in how the firm works, other than an increased level of employee disillusionment.

The discovery earlier this year by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) that UK workers’ job satisfaction was at a two-year low should make it even more obvious that your staff must be managed well if you do not want your employees to quit. 

When you require a reputable science recruitment agency with the ability to provide all manner of tailored recruitment solutions, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Hyper Recruitment Solutions. We are trusted experts in candidate screening and are fully compliant with current recruitment and employment law.

 
 
 
Hyper Recruitment Solutions (HRS) is committed to providing highly compliant and specialist recruitment consultancy dedicated to the Science and Technology communities.We are a recruitment consultancy that not only cares about our markets, people and community, but are actually a real part of them too. Since our launch in 2012, HRS has made a real impact in our market and we are honoured that we have been short listed in the categories of ‘Most Inspiring Leader' - Ricky Martin and 'Most Inspiring Newcomer' - Eve Hegarty.
 
“A collaboration of scientists supporting science”
 
Our professional and knowledgeable team of consultants have personal academic or industry expertise in science ensuring we deliver real life expertise and are true subject matter “consultants”, not just recruiters. Each consultant is given their own area of scientific expertise to empower and develop them. Everyone works directly with Ricky and Lord Sugar to develop their expertise in what we can only say is a unique way. This includes support on recruitment expertise, subject area knowledge (Ricky for Science and Lord Sugar for Technology) as well as promoting and supporting our social media and website reach.
 
HRS really is a highly specialist consultancy that not only cares about our markets, people and community, but are actually are part of them also. We may be a new player in the market place, however we are full of expertise, passion and commitment to both recruitment and the scientific communities.
It's not simply a case of finding the right science jobs and technology jobs for our candidates, we genuinely want to help people further their careers and reach their full potential within these fields. Providing recruitment solutions which will assist in the improvement and quality of life for all is a philosophy we all value at HRS.
 
Read our testimonials to find out what our clients, candidates and suppliers are saying about us.
 
We are honoured that HRS has been short listed for these awards. Being a finalist and winning an award can have a substantial impact on your career and company. This will certainly continue to drive our passion and determination to further exceed expectations.
 
The Recruiter Investing in Talent Awards 2014 is taking place 22 October 2014 at the Congress Center, London.
 
Congratulations to all the finalists, I wish you all the best of luck and look forward to celebrating with you at the awards ceremony next month! l potential within these fields.
 

Delivering the latest recruitment industry news, advice and analysis, Recruiter is one of the leading industry publications for the UK recruitment profession

Recruiter has a controlled circulation of over 16,000 plus individual and corporate REC members and reaches more recruitment professionals than the second and third-placed publications in the market combined.

As of July 2013 I will be writing a monthly column to discuss current topics of interests relating to the recruitment industry and this month, the topic is about The reality of setting up a recruitment consultancy. In short many people assume that setting up a business is a clear cut process, however in reality this is not the case. My first article will give you a quick snap shot as to why even though having worked for six years in recruitment, setting up my own consultancy was an entirely different experience. Configuring my PC and setting up my desk alone in an office on my first day was just some of the many realities I had to face.

The topic for next month will be Recruitment Excellence. I am happy to use this use this column to respond to questions from readers and share my opinions on topics which I also feel strongly about. So if you have a burning question to ask me on recruitment please do get in touch. Even if you don't have a question but have some thoughts on changes in the industry, then feel free to share them with me! I may comment on them in one of my future articles! Questions should be sent to therecruiter@hyperec.com

The website contains all the content from the magazine and can be searched free of charge. Find out more about my personal experiences of setting up a recruitment company below. 

Questions should be sent to therecruiter@hyperec.com

 

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