New Year Fireworks

An article recently published on Buzzfeed offered a number of suggestions for job seekers who are hoping to land their 'dream role' in the new year. The tips were fairly wide-ranging, touching on everything from cleaning up your social media accounts to choosing the right interview clothes.

Even so, we believe that we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions can add a few extra tips to the list - if you're serious about getting a new job in 2018, here are 5 more things that you should keep in mind:

1. Ask somebody else to read your CV.

Before you send your CV to any potential employers, give it to a trusted friend or family member and ask them to give it a quick read-through. Your proof-reader will hopefully catch any spelling / grammar mistakes that you failed to spot yourself, but more importantly, they'll be able to tell you whether or not the document is a fair representation of your abilities and experiences. It may just be that you're selling yourself short!

2. Tailor your CV to each job you apply for.

Once you've finished writing your CV, it's easy to just send exactly the same version to every prospective employer. But tweaking your CV each time you send it - tailoring it to the specific role you're applying for - can be a very worthwhile endeavour. You don't have to start from scratch every time you begin a new job application, but you should assess each job description and make sure that your CV is emphasising the right skills and focusing on the most relevant parts of your career history in each case.

3. Eliminate all filler from your cover letter.

When applying for certain jobs, you will be required to accompany your CV with a cover letter that explains why you're applying for the role in question (and what makes you a good fit for it). Your cover letter is a great opportunity to make a glowing first impression, but no matter what you decide to put in this document, it needs to be concise and to-the-point. Once you've written your cover letter, read back over it and make sure that every single sentence has a point - if it doesn't add anything to the picture you're trying to paint, delete it! Employers won't enjoy reading a lot of pointless waffle that wastes their precious time, and a shorter, punchier cover letter will likely make more of an impact anyway.

4. Know how you're getting to the interview.

Showing up late for an interview is almost always a surefire way to not get the job. Once you've been told where you're being interviewed, take the time to plan your journey carefully: will you be walking, driving, or taking public transport? What time will you need to set out in order to arrive on time? Do you have an umbrella in case it rains on the day? Planning is key if you want to be sure of arriving on time (and not looking too dishevelled because you had to rush!).

5. Didn't get the job? Ask for feedback.

Even an unsuccessful job application can be valuable if you're able to learn from it and improve your approach for next time. If a prospective employer tells you that you didn't get the job, thank them for their time and ask them if they would be willing to provide any feedback. Did your answers leave something to be desired? Could you have dressed more appropriately for the interview? Was it simply a question of experience? You can't control every aspect of your job application, but constructive feedback can give you a better idea of what employers are looking for and how to present yourself in the best possible way.

Useful links:

How to prepare for a Job Interview

Now that you've been offered a job interview, it's time to buckle down and prepare for what's ahead.

Many people think they don't need to prepare for a job interview. It's tempting to believe that your qualifications alone will be enough to get you the job, or that the interview is just a way for the employer to get to know you. Though both of these statements are true to an extent, they are certainly not the whole story.

We at Hyper Recruitment Solutions have helped countless candidates to secure their dream jobs, so today we're going to share some of our best tips on how to prepare for a job interview.

The following tips should stand you in very good stead when the time comes to sit down with your potential employer.

Research the company

Researching your potential employer is one of the most important steps when preparing for a job interview. Hopefully, if you've applied for the job, you already know a little bit about the company anyway; nevertheless, read through the company's website, find out what they do, what their values are, their past projects, their future ambitions, and so forth.

The most important things to take note of are as follows:

  • How long has the company been around?
  • How did they get to where they are?
  • Who do they work with?
  • Who are their competitors?
  • What are their company values?
  • What do you like about the company?
This information will also help you to make sure that this is the company you want to be working for.

Google yourself

In much the same way as you've been researching the company, your potential employer will most likely conduct their own research on you. So try to think like the employer. What's the first thing they'll do when they want to find out more about a potential candidate? That's right: Google them!

Google your name and check what comes up. If your Facebook profile shows up, complete with lots of photos from drunken nights out, be sure to check your account's privacy settings. If some unsavoury images of you appear in Google Images, be sure to delete those pictures from the place where you uploaded them.

Likewise, be sure to delete any controversial posts that may have seemed like a funny joke at the time, but could potentially breach company policy if associated with you. You don't want your potential employer to get the wrong opinion of you!

Prepare for the interview questions

Most job interviews come with a standard set of questions. You know the ones: 'what are your weaknesses?', 'where do you see yourself in five years?', 'provide an example of when you lead a team'. A good way to prepare for a job interview is to write out your answers to these questions and revise. If you don't know the standard questions, you should read our blog post about common job interview questions.

A good tip when preparing for these questions is to try and think of unique answers. Your potential employer will most likely ask every candidate these questions, and may therefore have heard many of the same answers over and over again. Think hard about these questions and try to provide an answer that provides your interviewer with an insight into who you are (rather than just another cliché that tells them next to nothing).

Dress sharp

We are often told to not judge a book by its cover, but interviewers only have a limited time with each candidate, and first impressions are incredibly important.

Dressing smart for your job interview not only shows your potential employer that you really care about this job, it can also give you a confidence boost. If you feel like you suit the part and look good, you will feel more at ease during your interview. Confidence is an attractive quality in a situation that usually incites nerves, so prepare for your job interview by making yourself feel more confident.

For more advice on this front, read our blog post about what to wear to a job interview.

Prepare your journey

Our final tip on how to prepare for your job interview is to be on time (early, if possible!) to your interview. If you are late, this is a clear indicator to your potential employer that you don't care enough about the job that's up for grabs.

Plan ahead and prepare your journey. If the company is based somewhere that's not local to you, check your travel times and the traffic rigorously prior to the interview. If you think you may be late, be sure to call ahead and let them know why you will be late. After all, a traffic jam can be forgiven as long as you handle it professionally and reasonably.

Good luck! We hope our tips on how to prepare for a job interview have helped you. If you're still looking for your dream job, you can browse the latest science and technology jobs here.

Job interview questions and answers

So you've secured a job interview - congrats! The next step is to start preparing for the interview questions that you might be asked.

As you may already know, there are a number of typical questions and answers that come up at every interview. Today we're going to look at what these could be and the best way to answer them.

'Tell me about yourself.'

While this may seem like the easiest interview question to answer, if you're caught off-guard it can actually be one of the most difficult. What exactly do employers want to hear when they ask this question? Is it your academic history, your ambitions, your reasons for applying?

A little bit of each topic is perhaps the best way to answer this interview question. Be sure to detail previous academic history, ambitions, and reasons for applying that make you a great fit for the job. Make sure you don't ramble, though, and make sure all of the information is relevant. The employer is trying to understand who you are as a person and how you would fit into the company.

'Why should we hire you?'

You'll find that you get asked this question in most job interviews, so it's an important one to prepare an answer for. Though it may seem like a rather difficult question to answer, the employer is actually just trying to see how you have thought of yourself in relation to the company.

It's valuable to know how your skills suit the job role, but remember, the employer wants to know how you fit into their company specifically. So when it comes to answering this question, be sure to include details of how your skills suit the job role and how you, personally, suit the company.

This interview question gives you a great opportunity to stand out, so make sure your answer is both memorable and concise. For further advice and information on how to best answer this question, read our blog here.

'What do you know about this company?'

This may seem like a bit of a vain interview question from the company's side, but yet again, it's a very important part of many job interviews. Most companies are proud of their history, culture, and ambitions, and they will want to know you value the same things.

To prepare for this interview question, be sure to do extensive research on the company. Look up important things like:

  • When they started
  • Their biggest projects to date
  • Research they've conducted (if applicable)
  • The company's values and brand identity
Not only will these things help you to answer the question, they'll also help you decide if this is actually a job you want.

'Why did you leave your last job?'

This, understandably, is a very common interview question. Most employers want to know what led to you leaving your last company as it will help them to understand what you look for in a job. Honesty is always the best policy, but if (for instance) you had to resign from your last job because you had a falling out with your boss, be tactful about how you word this.

Here's an example: instead of saying 'I left because I hated my last manager', you could say 'I left my job because the company culture didn't feel like a good fit for me'. It's best to always be reasonably respectful of your previous company - you don't want the interviewer to think you'll end up bad-mouthing their company down the line.

'What's your greatest achievement?'

Compared to some of the other questions we've covered today, this is a much nicer one to prepare for. The best way to prepare for this question is to think back through all the things you're proud of. It's best to think of professional achievements, but you can use more general life events too as long as they reflect your suitability for the job.

You can use any awards you've won, successes with clients, big breakthroughs, or even the grade you received at university. You could even use the birth of your child or your marriage if you think this is relevant to the role; for example, if becoming a parent has made you more conscientious, or planning your wedding made you more organised, these are unique answers that will stand out in an employer's mind.

We hope these common interview questions and answers have helped you prepare for your upcoming interview! If you're still looking for jobs, click here to browse the latest science jobs from HRS.

What to Wear to a Job Interview

Job interviews are all about making a good first impression, and nothing makes or breaks a first impression like how you're dressed. When a potential employer invites you to an interview, you should immediately start thinking about what to wear - what is the right outfit for this interview?

To some extent, of course, the answer to that question will depend on what sort of job you're interviewing for, but it's always important to look neat and professional. Even if you're hoping to land a role at a trendy tech start-up where all the employees wear T-shirts and jeans, it pays to look smart for the interview.

With that in mind, here - courtesy of the team here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions - are some top tips to help you get dressed for that career-making job interview:

  • First of all, be prepared. Don't wait until the day of the interview to select your outfit (especially if you're indecisive - showing up late won't look good regardless of what you're wearing!). Pick your clothes a few days in advance, and get them out of wardrobe to check that they're clean and crease-free. Leave yourself plenty of time to do laundry and ironing, just in case.

  • Don't dress too outrageously. Novelty ties, plunging necklines, garishly bright colours...a good interview outfit avoids all of these things. You want the interviewer to remember you for your articulate and intelligent answers, not for your red polka-dot shirt or your skimpy dress.

  • Be moderate with make-up, jewellery and scents. A drop of cologne or a touch of make-up? No problem. But you're not going on a date or hitting the clubs - you're applying for a job, so there's no need to do yourself up too extravagantly.

  • You're not there to show off your fashion sense. By all means wear nice, modern-looking clothes - you don't want to look like you've stepped through a portal from the 1970s. But unless you're interviewing for a post at some glossy magazine, your clothes shouldn't be trying to persuade the interviewer of your smashing fashion sense. Make a good impression by looking tidy and together, not by dressing for the catwalk.

  • Check your hair. Like clothing, hair can have a very powerful impact on what people think when they meet you for the first time. Your hairdo should be as neat and tidy as your outfit, so spend a little time sorting it out before you set off for the interview (and don't be afraid to go for a trim if you need it).

  • It's better to be overdressed than underdressed. It's an enormously clichéd piece of advice to offer, but 'dress for the job you want, not the job you have' is a good saying to bear in mind when pondering what to wear to a job interview. Most employers will expect interviewees to look reasonably smart even if they allow their employees to dress casually, and if in doubt, it's always safer to dress formally. In the vast majority of cases, business attire will make a far better impression than the clothes you wear around the house.

If you need more interview preparation tips, be sure to visit our Interview Advice page!

Still looking for your dream job? Browse the latest science and technology vacancies here.

Image courtesy of pixabay.com

Telephone Interview

So you've just heard back from that job you applied for, and it's good news: they were impressed with your CV, and you've made it through to the interview stage. However, this won't be a traditional, face-to-face job interview - as it turns out, this particular employer prefers to do things over the phone.

You might be pleased to hear this at first. On paper, a telephone interview sounds quite a bit easier than the alternative: no need to get a haircut, no need to iron your interview suit, no need to worry about how you're going to get there on time. All you have to do is pick up the phone and have a conversation. Simple, right?

But being interviewed over the phone rather than meeting your potential employer in the flesh does have its disadvantages. For example...

  • The employer won't be able to connect with you in quite the same way as if you were right there in front of them. Facial expressions and body language are important when you're trying to get someone to warm to you, but you can't rely on them during a phone interview - instead, you're forced to present yourself well and get your points across using speech alone.

  • Similarly, you won't be able to use the interviewer's physical cues to assess how well (or not) the interview is going. It can be difficult to give a relaxed and confident performance when you don't know whether the person you're talking to is smiling or frowning.

  • Telephone interviews tend to be shorter and less in-depth than traditional job interviews, which leaves you with a significantly smaller window of opportunity. Less time means fewer chances to talk yourself up and persuade the interviewer of your suitability for the role.

  • While it can be nice to conduct a job interview from the comfort of your own living room, the home environment can be distracting and detrimental to the professional image you're trying to project. Many a remote interview has been interrupted by a child or pet wandering into the room at an inopportune moment, and even if you're home alone, there's still a chance that the doorbell will ring, or that you'll get sidetracked by one of the many other things vying for your attention.

By now, you should be beginning to realise that telephone interviews aren't necessarily the walk in the park that they may resemble at first glance. There are a lot of obstacles to overcome, and we haven't even mentioned the fact that some people genuinely struggle to talk on the phone (even if they're perfectly outgoing and eloquent in person).

But don't despair - you can still ace your phone interview and land the job of your dreams without a hitch. To help you do so, here are five top telephone interview tips from the experts here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions:

1. Choose the right space.

Our phones go everywhere we go nowadays, which means that it's possible to take calls in the park, the car, the supermarket, and just about anywhere else you fancy. However, if at all possible, you should avoid conducting a job interview while on the go; instead, find a quiet, secluded room where you can be fairly certain you won't be interrupted. Try to choose somewhere with as few distractions and diversions as possible.

2. Focus on the task at hand.

Ideally, you shouldn't be doing anything else while you're being interviewed. You wouldn't doodle or surf the web or watch TV during a face-to-face job interview, so you should absolutely avoid those activities when on the phone. And don't eat anything during the call - it's impolite, and the person on the other end might have a hard time understanding you with your mouth full.

3. Make notes beforehand.

It never hurts to prepare. Keep your CV handy throughout the call (along with your cover letter, the company's details, and anything else that might prove useful) so that you can quickly refer to key information as necessary. Before the interview, you may also wish to draft answers to common questions so that you won't 'um' and 'ah' too much when you're in the hot seat. If you don't think it will be too much of a distraction, it might even be worth keeping a pen and some paper handy during the call itself so that you can make notes on the fly.

4. Don't speak too quickly.

During any sort of interview, it's easy to let your nerves get the better of you and speak too quickly to be understood. Before responding to each question, take a breath and remind yourself to answer slowly, steadily, and clearly. You'll come off a lot better for it, and the interviewer won't have to ask you to repeat yourself.

5. Be concise.

Just as it's important to try not to talk too fast, it's also important not to talk too much. Waffling on needlessly won't endear you to your potential employer - it's never fun to sit through a long, rambling answer, and it's even worse when you're on the phone and the physical cues we discussed earlier aren't present to make the monologue more engaging. If you really want to impress, answer each question in as few words as possible (while still making your point clear each time).

Useful Links:

User Menu

Posts by Keyword

Month List