Life in the 21st century is very much a world of instant gratification, from online shopping to on-demand TV. If you want something, it's never been easier or quicker to get it post-haste.

However, one thing that is very much immune from such immediacy is careers and achieving your professional goals is a habitually lengthy process.

Worse still, simply being good at your job won't always translate to upward momentum and your professional fate is often frustratingly out of your own hands.

In order to go from the outhouse to the penthouse, you'll need to be patient and bide your time, navigating through the murky waters of office politics along the way.

Here are a few helpful tips to help you secure that promotion without selling your soul.

 

how to get promoted

 

Asking for a Promotion

When it comes to asking for a promotion, simply knowing how to ask for a promotion can make a huge difference. It's a lot more complex than simply putting in a request and getting the thumbs up.

Self-evaluation is a key part of the process. Gaining an honest assessment of your own skills will help you to gauge what you're realistically capable of, as well as what you feel you deserve.

Timing is often a pivotal factor too and simply catching your boss at the right time can play into your favour massively. Similarly, asking for a promotion during a downswing in business is also an unwise move.

 

"How Do I Get Promoted?"

While the phrase "you don't ask, you don't get" is often applicable in life, in the workplace, simply asking for a promotion isn't always the best course of action.

Preparation is the best provision for opportunity and will stand you in good stead when it comes to demonstrating just why you deserve a bump up the pecking order.

Put the groundwork in beforehand by following these five steps to success and make your dreams of promotion a realistic, achievable goal.

 

Go Above and Beyond

As cliché as it may sound, going the extra mile can go a long way (considerably further than the aforementioned mile), particularly if that additional effort involves working at a level above your pay grade.

The best way to prove you're the right person for a role is to audition for it first. If you're already doing the duties of the role you want, it'll make it a whole lot easier to plead your case when the opportunity arises.

While this could backfire and lead to management letting you continue to perform at a higher level for less pay, any company worth their salt will recognise your worth and channel that potential accordingly.

 

Take Action

Assertiveness shows confidence and, as the old saying goes, it's better to ask for forgiveness than permission. If you see an opportunity to better the company, don't be afraid to grab that opportunity with both hands, even if it falls outside your remit.

While it can sometimes be a bit of a gamble, it's always worth weighing up the risk/reward ratio. Actions speak louder than words and a keen eye for opportunity, along with the hunger to act on it, is a valuable asset to any manager.

For example, if you work in a gym tasked with manning the front desk, it's highly unlikely that the manager would reprimand you for securing an annual membership from a new arrival.

 

Make a Difference

When you talk about ammunition for a promotion, validation doesn't come any stronger than cold hard facts.

If your contributions have a direct effect on the organisation as a whole, there's no denying the impact your presence has had on the company. Take note of any stats that reflect your performance, such as revenue or conversions.

Similarly, making yourself an invaluable member of your team can also make you a indispensable commodity in your immediate working environment and, more importantly, to your manager.

Don't be shy when it comes to helping your colleagues and those around you to help establish yourself as a critical cog in the working machine.

 

Dress to Impress

You've probably heard the old adage "dress for the job you want, not the one you have". While it might not be as applicable if you dream of becoming a pro wrestler or a rock star, it can work wonders when it comes to getting a promotion.

Take a look at what your boss is wearing… and what their boss is wearing… and what their boss's boss is wearing. If they are suited and booted and decked out in shirts and ties, an un-ironed polo and jean shorts probably won't get you a seat at the head table.

Think smart, dress smarter and look the part to get the part. Looking sharp will also get you noticed and help you stand out from the crowd, which brings us nicely to our next point…

 

Break Away from the Pack

If you want your superiors to see you as someone special and, more importantly, someone with a higher purpose, you'll need to stand out from the crowd.

Make yourself known to those that make the decisions, whether that's via a personal introduction or a more cerebral approach.

Get involved with projects and make an effort when it comes to social occasions and team exercises. An outgoing approach will help raise your profile and prove to management that you're more than just a nameless face at the coffee machine.

 

Earn It the Right Way

In your pursuit of that elusive promotion, never lose sight of the golden rule: nobody likes a brown-noser.

While playing the game is often a necessary part of the process, doing so at the expense of your teammates to get ahead is highly unethical, not to mention unpopular and inflammatory.

What's more, it won't win you any friends and can make your working life somewhat miserable. After all, a promotion can lose its appeal if your team universally dislikes you.

Follow the steps above to gain your promotion the right way – on the basis of your worth, not your ability to suck up and laugh at unfunny jokes.

 

For more workplace advice and job tips, why not speak to one of our expert advisors? Call now on 0203 225 5120 or click the button below to get in touch online today.

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While conventional methods of job application are the widely accepted norm for job hunters nationwide, neglecting the alternatives could be hindering your job search dramatically.

Outside of the standard application route, there are myriad of unconventional ways to find a job, ranging from the weird and wonderful to the risky and daring.

Straddling that dark horse somewhere in the middle, we’ve created this unique list of creative ways to find a job to help you stand out from the crowd.

 

creative ways to get a job, creative ways to find a job , unconventional ways to find a job

 

Creative Ways to Get a Job

When it comes to the bland world of job applications, variety is very much the spice of life. So, brush those of bland CVs, dull cover letters and generic applications aside and take heed of these quirky and unconventional ways to find a job.

 

Start Over

One of the best ways to ensure your new CV and cover letter are as relevant and up-to-date as possible is to rip up your old version and start over.

While your professional history may not have changed since you last applied for a job, employment trends likely have, including layout and look as well as content.

As the old saying goes, you can’t move forward while your looking back, so let go of the pre-existing resume and march on with the new and improved version of you.

 

Be Creative

Speaking of cover letters, put yourself in the shoes of the employer when it comes to penning your application.

Reams of candidates listing their professional experiences in dry, matter of fact, business-speak is enough to put a glass eye to sleep. While it’s important to include key achievements, there’s no law preventing you from injecting a bit of life into your writing.

If you’re claiming to be an “outside-the-box thinker”, throw an anecdote or a witty quip in there to prove it. Originality is engaging and memorable, two attributes that could well secure you a place at interview.

 

Go Old-School

The world has never been as digitally-focused as it is today, with more focus on online activity than ever before.

For many businesses, the hiring process takes place exclusively online, whether it’s through recruitment sites, email or online application forms. What better way to stand out than to take the road less travelled?

A printed CV accompanied by a hand-written cover letter is the perfect way to break away from the pack, stand up and be counted. Simply post your hard copy application to the relevant person/department.

 

Show Personality

Much like creative engagement in a cover letter is a great way of allowing your personality to shine through a piece of A4, showing that same personality at interview can be the difference between a fleeting farewell and a hiring handshake.

By the time you reach the interview stage, the talent pool will have been whittled down from the many to the few with little separating the field of competition in terms of skills.

A sure-fire way to distinguish yourself from Candidate A, B and C is to drop the interview façade and be yourself. After all, if you are successful, it’s only a matter of time before they find out the real you anyway.

Likeable, funny and genuine candidates that pass the personality test are far more likely to be deemed a good fit for the team than an uptight and reserved applicant who plays the cards close to the chest.

 

For more unconventional ways to find a job, why not call HRS today and speak with one of our trained advisors? Call now on 0203 225 5120 or alternatively get in touch online by clicking the button below.

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The recruitment process can be a long road from A to B, presenting a cast of applicants that often spreads into the hundreds, particularly for large, reputable companies.

As such, many businesses – big and small – will turn to recruitment agencies for help.

Recruitment companies essentially act as the middle man between the employer and the candidate, tasked with finding the right candidate for the role.

If you’re thinking of using a recruitment agency in your job search, it could be the smart choice. Here are five great reasons to use a recruitment agency to find a job.

 

why use a recruitment agency, why use a recruitment agency to find a job, using recruitment agency

 

Exclusive Jobs

Recruitment agencies commonly get the nod from businesses over traditional in-house recruitment methods as they will pre-sift the CVs, leaving the cream of the crop for interview.

As a result, recruitment agencies often have advance access to jobs that are yet to become publicly available via traditional job boards. Recruitment agencies can also have access to exclusive jobs that are completely unavailable elsewhere.

What's more, it’s not unusual for businesses to close a job ad early if they find the right candidate, so getting in early can be a big difference-maker.

 

Guidance & Support

Job hunting can be a frustrating experience, particularly when applications aren’t producing responses and you seemingly aren’t making any headway in your employment search.

Having a designated recruitment agent assigned to fight your corner can be a great form of support in your quest for employment, acting as a coach as well as a means to an end.

A personal contact capable of pointing you in the right direction and providing employer insight can be invaluable, particularly when it comes to tailoring applications.

 

Incentivised Performance

As a general industry rule, recruitment agencies won’t get paid by the recruiter until the vacancy has been filled.

As such, it’s in their best interest to help you get the job you apply for and prepare you for interview as best they can, should you make the final cut.

That being said, this can backfire in that the recruitment process can, at times, turn into a sale with the onus on simply getting you employed rather than getting you the job that suits.

Nevertheless, if you are more concerned with getting any job as opposed to getting the job, this won’t be an issue.

 

Industry Expertise

Recruitment agencies can often be industry-specific, with jobs targeted at a specific job sector or specialism (such as science).

Approaching such an agency can be a smart move as those that work there will naturally come equipped with existing knowledge of the industry and therefore detailed knowledge of the roles.

This can translate into clarity of what is expected and informed insight into the company which, in turn, gives you the upper hand in the application process.

This expertise can be a great trump card when it comes to role-specific tips, such as specifics to include on your CV and things to mention at interview.

 

Constructive Feedback

Feedback is imperative when it comes to improving performance and something that is often lacking during the recruitment process.

Employers are busy people and interview feedback is not guaranteed. Meanwhile, feedback on an application is virtually non-existent.

Conversely, recruitments agencies can provide a helpful report of your output, letting you know what worked and what didn’t in order to help you improve for next time.

Whether that’s advice on switching up your CV to tailor it to a role or providing you with interview insights and notes from the interviewers.

 

For more job-seeking advice and application tips, why not drop us a line? Call now on 0203 225 5120 or get in touch online using the link below.

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Crumpled-up paper

Getting turned down for a job can be disheartening at the best of times and downright devastating at the worst.

Rejection is particularly frustrating if it comes after you went to the trouble of attending a job interview - making it to the very end of the process only to fall at final hurdle can be a bitter pill to swallow.

That being said, life is a never-ending learning experience, and there can be victory in defeat - even when it comes to not getting the job.

 

Why ask for feedback after interview rejection?

Swallowing your pride and asking 'why?' takes real bravery. After all, you bared your soul in the interview, attempted to sell yourself based on your best qualities, and got turned down all the same – it's hard not to take that personally.

Surely asking your rejectors to elaborate on their decision is akin to asking an ex why they decided to dump you in favour of someone else?

Well, luckily, it needn't be quite as fraught an experience as that.

 

The benefits of asking for feedback after a job interview

Asking for feedback after a job interview can actually be very helpful on a number of levels. While it may seem like you're willingly rubbing salt into your own unemployable wounds, there are a variety of benefits to be had:

 

Discover what worked (and what didn't)

Knowing what went well and what didn't can be a great way to streamline your approach to future job applications, and identifying key areas that are in need of improvement can help you to fill in any gaps in your interview game.

If you knocked it out of the park with your presentation skills but struggled to answer their questions about the business, you know to do more revision next time. On the other hand, if you lacked a skill that the other candidate had, you may want to look into mastering that skill for yourself.

It may not even have had anything to do with your skills at all: it could have been a single throwaway comment that irked the interviewer, or the fact you'd neglected to shave that morning. Either way, clarity can help you right your wrongs and ensure lightning doesn't strike twice.

 

Learn something new

Thorough feedback is frequently helpful, but sometimes, it can be outright enlightening.

From body language to bad habits, asking for comments on your interview performance could lead you to find out something new about yourself that you didn't know about before. This will allow you to work on yourself if necessary.

Whether it's unconsciously doodling on your notepad, not maintaining eye contact out of sheer nerves, or simply seeming disinterested in an attempt to present yourself as calm, brutally honest feedback can make for great constructive criticism.

 

Find out what they want

Interviewer feedback can be a great way to gauge exactly what employers are looking for (and then make sure you present it in future interviews).

If your interviewer informs you that you seemed too brash and self-assertive, try to reign it in a bit next time. If your suit was too loud, tone it down in future. If your handshake was too weak, train up those forearms!

Whatever feedback you are given is a peek behind the curtain at what other employers are likely to be looking for too, so take note and be sure to tick those boxes on your next attempt.

 

Leave the door open

A willingness to learn and better yourself is a great trait to have. Actively seeking ways to improve yourself can leave a lasting impression on a potential employer.

If this is a company you really want to work for or a vacancy you are hoping will crop up again, asking for feedback in a polite and grateful manner could leave the door open to future opportunities.

You never know - the successful candidate may not last, and a positive parting of ways now could leave you first in line for a call-up.

 

How to ask for feedback after an interview

While the setback of job rejection can leave a fresh scar that's particularly tender to the touch, it's important to remain calm, level-headed, and - above all - courteous in your response. This is far easier to do via email, so if possible, go down the digital route rather than making a phone call.

That being said, there are a few things to keep in mind when you're responding to a rejection email. Firstly, remember that their mind is made up by this point and this isn't a window to make them reconsider. Instead, use your response as an opportunity to further endear yourself and leave them with a lasting positive impression.

Display your gratitude for the time they gave you and, if you do choose to relay your disappointment, be sure to do so in a manner that is friendly and reinforces your desire to hopefully work together in the future.

Employers are far more likely to respond to your request if a) you are genuine in your response, and b) you present yourself as a potential candidate for the future. The interviewers have already invested time in you throughout this process, and a positive farewell could still result in good things to come.

Hyper Recruitment Solutions have helped countless candidates to secure rewarding jobs in the science and technology sectors. Browse our latest job listings here, or click the following links for more interview advice...

Job Interview Checklist   How Honest Should I Be in an Interview?

Two people negotiating a job contract

Are you thinking about changing jobs? Here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we often get asked the question...

"When is the best time to switch jobs?"

...and, unfortunately, there's no definitive answer. It's all dependent on your specific circumstances and what point you're at in your career.

The following questions should help you decide if the time is right to make a change:

 

How long have you been in your current job?

Interviewers will always be interested in the level of 'professional stability' you have displayed in your working life to date. If you're someone who has repeatedly jumped from job to job without ever really progressing upwards or taking the time to settle into a particular role, this can indicate that you'll be quick to leave their company behind, too.

Of course, for a potential employer, this can be incredibly off-putting. If you've only been in your current role for a few weeks or months, it might not be a great idea to switch jobs just yet.

 

Is there room to progress?

For lots of people, the right time to switch jobs comes when they no longer feel like they can progress in their current role. Have you been in the same job for several years?

If you haven't had a promotion or pay rise for a long time and you don't see one on the horizon, this may be a sign that now would be a good time to switch jobs. After all, you don't want to continue to working hard for an employer who will never encourage you to progress further in your career.

 

How does it make you feel?

We spend a huge portion of our adult lives at work, and if at all possible, it's definitely worth pursuing a role and a working environment that make you feel happy and positive. If you feel that you're doggedly persevering with a job that - for whatever reason - is making you unhappy, it may well be time for a change.

Of course, there is a difference between a couple of bad days and a job that consistently makes you miserable. Take a few days to mull over your decision, and don't hand in your notice until you're sure about how you're feeling.

If you're ready to switch jobs, why not browse the vacancies we currently have on offer here at HRS?

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