Women in Science

The International Day of Women and Girls in Science, which takes place on the 11th of February every year, was created by the United Nations as part of the ongoing effort to address gender imbalance in core STEM subjects and promote the participation of women in scientific roles.

The Statistics

Across 14 different countries, the percentage of women graduating from universities with degrees in science-related subjects are as follows:

  • Bachelor's Degree: 18%
  • Master's Degree: 8%
  • PhD: 2%

These low figures are quite disheartening, as are reports that under 30% of scientific research and development roles are currently held by women.

The UN's International Day of Women and Girls in Science aims to encourage women and young girls to pursue an education or career in science and dramatically raise the above percentages.

Breaking Gender Stereotypes

To mark the occasion, we'd like to take a look at just some of the many prolific female scientists who have done vital work throughout history and helped to pave the way for gender equality in scientific fields:

Lise Meitner (1878-1968)

Lise Meitner was an Austrian-Swedish physicist who specialised in radioactivity and nuclear physics. Together with a select group of other scientists, she discovered nuclear fission of uranium - the basic principle of the nuclear weapons that were to follow.

Grace Hopper (1906-1992)

Grace Hopper was an American computer scientist. She was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark 1 computer, and she developed an early variation of the programming language COBOL which is still in use today.

Sandra Faber (1944- )

Sandra Faber is an astrophysicist specialising in the evolution of galaxies. Some of her important contributions to science include linking the brightness of galaxies to the speed of stars within them and helping to design the Keck telescopes in Hawaii.

Are you ready to pursue a career in science? HRS is here to help! Click the link below to browse a huge selection of science jobs spanning a variety of scientific fields.

See All Science Jobs >

If you are considering pursuing (or already working towards) a career in science, you might be curious as to which jobs can earn you the most money, making the hard work you put into studying worthwhile and providing you with financial security for the future.

Highest Paying Science Jobs

Specialists in the STEM industries (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) are constantly in high demand due to the rapid pace at which these fields develop and change. Therefore, you can be fairly certain that pursuing a career in any of these industries will have a reasonably good chance of leading to a fairly high salary.

But let's take a closer look at science jobs specifically.

The Highest-Paying Science Jobs

Of course, there are lots of different professions - from biotechnology to manufacturing - that could potentially fall under the 'science' umbrella, but here are some of the best-paid science jobs of all (salary estimates taken from nationalcareers.service.gov.uk).


Microbiologist

Starting salary: £26,250 per annum

Experienced salary: £99,000 per annum


Physicist

Starting salary: £14,000 per annum

Experienced salary: £70,000 per annum


Software Developer

Starting salary: £20,000 per annum

Experienced salary: £70,000 per annum


Pharmacologist

Starting salary: £25,000 per annum

Experienced salary: £80,000 per annum


Does a job in one of these lucrative science professions sound good to you? Click the button below to browse current science vacancies across the UK, or create a Candidate account to upload your CV and apply for jobs online!

Browse Science Jobs >

Irritating Job

Hyper Recruitment Solutions recently conducted a survey to investigate what irritates employees in the workplace, and the results are truly staggering!


78% of employees have directly experienced rudeness in the workplace, including:

  • Being sworn at (54%)
  • Being reprimanded in front of peers (48%)
  • Being spoken over in a meeting (44%)
  • A personal remark about a choice of outfit (42%)

Our research further revealed that 92% of employees claim to have never been accused of workplace rudeness, despite 78% claiming that they’ve been on the receiving end.

Many of the respondents who stated that they had been accused of rudeness by colleagues cited swearing and speaking too directly as common reasons.


94% of employees said they thought that some physical contact in the workplace was acceptable.

However, responses varied depending on the type of contact:

  • A pat on the shoulder (52%)
  • A high-five (39%)
  • A hug (35%)
  • A fist bump (32%)
  • A kiss on the cheek (17%)

HRS Managing Director Ricky Martin says: “These results are pretty surprising. We often hear and read in the media how physical contact at work isn’t acceptable, yet our survey results suggest otherwise. Of course, physical contact isn’t always appropriate or well received, so I’d advise that it’s essential to be aware of factors such as personality, religion and culture. What might be regarded as friendly in one culture may be deemed deeply offensive in another! However, as the results suggest, should the relationship be there and requited, it shouldn’t be frowned upon for colleagues to hug, high-five or give one another a pat on the back!”


72% of employees would take action if working with a colleague with poor personal hygiene. What action would they take?

  • 36% of people would tell the person directly. Of these, men (78%) were more likely than women (68%) to voice their concerns about a colleague.

  • A further 36% would raise the issue with HR or management to handle the problem on their behalf.

This straight-talking approach is carried over into issues such as colleague disputes - over a third of employees surveyed would directly tell a colleague they don’t like them, with men (43%) being more likely to do so than women (24%).

Ricky says: “Workplace disputes and personality clashes are nothing new. What the results show is how direct people are when handling often-sensitive issues. I’d always advise that taking an open and honest approach with colleagues will work better in the long-term, but it’s important that colleagues are mindful not to unintentionally offend or create further issues in doing so.”


81% of employees cited small talk with colleagues as irritating.

Football and children were cited as the most irritating topics of conversation, as well as:

  • Trash-talking colleagues and clients (36%)
  • Forced pleasantries, such as 'How are you?' and 'Happy New Year!' (29%)
  • The weather (17%)

50% of employees admitted they had purposely not made a hot drink for themselves, just so they wouldn't have to make one for others!

This shows that while employees are willing to confront some issues head-on, they would sometimes rather avoid a situation completely than feel obliged to do something (like making a cup of tea for others in the workplace).


Why did we conduct this research?

HRS isn't just a company that puts people into jobs - we help candidates to find roles within organisations that make life-saving medicines and life-changing technologies. Ultimately, the people we support change lives!

With this in mind, we thought it essential to understand exactly why some people - even those in important, rewarding roles that look to be perfect for them - end up disengaging and leaving their employer. We hoped that this survey would uncover another side of the workplace, one that's not usually visible in CVs and job descriptions.

For more news and insights about the world of work, be sure to follow Hyper Recruitment Solutions on Facebook and Twitter!

HRS on Facebook >   @Hyperec_HRS on Twitter >

Blue Monday

Blue Monday, dubbed the 'most depressing day of the year', typically falls on the third Monday of January every year. In the case of 2019, 21st January is the date in which everyone is supposedly down in the dumps and not feeling their best. But why? Well, let's find out!

Blue Monday, was first publicised back in 2005 as part of a press release from a holiday company, that claimed to have calculated the date using an equation that takes into account a number of different variables. These variables include weather conditions, the time since Christmas and failing any New Year's resolutions, debt and motivational levels as well as feeling the need to take action.

All of these things were placed into an equation that subsequently deemed the third January of every year as the most depressing day. However, here at HRS, we don't believe in Blue Monday and see it as just another day! Another day that you can use to make positive changes to your life and make a brighter start to your 2019.

In 2018, the creator of Blue Monday insisted that it was "never his intention to make the day sound negative", and in fact, he was simply trying "to inspire people to take action and make bold life choices." But you don't need Blue Monday as a source of inspiration or an excuse to start making bold life choices or take action and if you do find yourself feeling a little blue, talk to people around you to lift yourself up and become a positive influence for others.


If you are feeling extra-motivated however, Hyper Recruitment Solutions want to help you! If you're looking to make the best start to 2019 that you can make and push your career within the science industry further with new and exciting opportunities, why not browse the science jobs that we are currently recruiting for? Set the tone of your 2019 and take the first step to become a better you by leaving Blue Monday in the past!

To view the full list of science jobs that we're currently recruiting for, simply click below. If you require further information or assistance regarding any of our jobs, then please do not hesitate to contact us today.

New Year Fireworks

An article published on Buzzfeed last December offered a number of suggestions for job seekers hoping to land their 'dream role' in 2018. The tips were fairly wide-ranging, touching on everything from cleaning up your social media accounts to choosing the right interview clothes.

Even so, we believe that we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions can add a few extra tips to that list for 2019 - if you're serious about getting a new job in the new year, here are 5 more things that you should keep in mind:

1. Ask somebody else to read your CV.

Before you submit your CV to any potential employers, send it to a trusted friend or family member and ask them to give it a quick read-through.

Your proof-reader will hopefully catch any spelling / grammar mistakes that you failed to spot yourself, but more importantly, they'll be able to tell you whether or not the document is a fair representation of your abilities and experiences. They may think you're selling yourself short!

2. Tailor your CV to each job you apply for.

Once you've finished writing your CV, it's easy to just send exactly the same version to every prospective employer. But tweaking your CV each time you send it - tailoring it to the specific role you're applying for - can be a very worthwhile endeavour. You don't have to start from scratch every time you begin a new job application, but you should assess each job description and make sure that your CV is emphasising the right skills and focusing on the most relevant parts of your career history in each case.

3. Eliminate all filler from your cover letter.

When applying for certain jobs, you will be required to accompany your CV with a cover letter that explains why you're applying for the role in question (and what makes you a good fit for it). Your cover letter is a great opportunity to make a glowing first impression, but no matter what you decide to put in this document, it needs to be concise and to-the-point.

Once you've written your cover letter, read back over it and make sure that every single sentence has a reason to be there - if it doesn't add anything to the picture you're trying to paint, delete it! Employers won't enjoy reading a lot of pointless waffle that wastes their precious time, and a shorter, punchier cover letter will likely make more of an impact anyway.

4. Know how you're getting to the interview.

Showing up late for an interview is almost always a surefire way to not get the job. Once you've been told where you're being interviewed, take the time to plan your journey carefully:

  • Will you be walking, driving, or taking public transport?
  • What time will you need to set out in order to arrive on time?
  • Do you have an umbrella in case it rains on the day?
Planning is key if you want to be sure of arriving on time (and not looking too dishevelled when you get there!).

5. Didn't get the job? Ask for feedback.

Even an unsuccessful job application can be valuable if you're able to learn from it and do better next time. If a prospective employer tells you that you didn't get the job, thank them for their time and ask them if they would be willing to provide any feedback. For example:

  • Did your answers leave something to be desired?
  • Could you have dressed more appropriately for the interview?
  • Was it simply a question of experience?
You can't control every aspect of your job application, but constructive feedback can give you a better idea of what employers are looking for and how to present yourself in the best possible way.

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