The CV has been said to be dying – or at least nearing its end – on more than a few occasions in the past. Just look at reports from the likes of the Daily Mail that candidates are increasingly replacing their CVs with ‘MeVies’ – footage of themselves designed to catch an employer’s eye – or statistics shared by Dr Tim Sparkes for People Management indicating that only one in 10 Millennials provided a digital CV at their last interview

Nor is it a surprise that people might come to such conclusions. After all, we are seemingly living in a more ‘connected’ world than ever. Why do you still need such an outdated or cumbersome thing as a CV, when you can simply text or email a prospective employer, perhaps directing them towards your LinkedIn profile? 

Well, for one thing, many potential employers will still end an online conversation with you by asking you to send them your CV. As much as they might appreciate you telling them everything about yourself that makes you such a great candidate for their vacancy or company, they still usually like to have something simple and concise to glance back at – and nothing fulfils that role quite as well as a CV.

A digital profile isn’t the answer to everything

There are a few other reasons why online profiles and portfolios haven’t completely replaced the CV as yet. For example, while you could theoretically alter your LinkedIn profile to target only the latest vacancy for which you happen to be applying, it would be quite a hassle to have to do so every single time you contacted a company about a role.

A CV, by contrast, can be tweaked and tailored so that at any one time, you can have several alternate versions from which to choose, depending on the latest employer or sector that you are targeting. You can emphasise certain skills and experiences while de-emphasising others, and the prospective employer will still see that same information and layout whenever they look back at it.

By contrast, you can’t control exactly who, and from exactly what industry, is looking over your LinkedIn or other online profile at any one time. That’s not to suggest that your LinkedIn profile doesn’t have its own invaluable role, not least as it is capable of containing information that you might not be able to fit onto a two-page CV.

However, a polished CV remains a crucial part of your armoury when you come to market yourself to employers. This is why, here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we furnish our candidates with all of the advice they need to refine and tailor their CV for science jobs.

CVs remain a key part of your wider branding package

It’s impossible to say exactly what will happen to the CV in the years to come – many theories have been proposed about its likely fate, and many new and ongoing trends cited.

What is clear, though, is that right now, the CV continues to play a crucial role in candidates’ dealings with science recruitment agencies and employers. It’s a portable and easy-to-refer-to part of your wider branding package that should also include the likes of online profiles and portfolios and cover letters.

Whether you are looking for a job in biotechnology, pharmacology, the environment or any of a wide range of science sectors, here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we will help you to make your own CV as relevant and impactful as possible. Simply contact our team today to learn more


Hyper Recruitment Solutions are delighted to announce that Managing Director, Ricky Martin has been elected as the Chair of the REC's Life Sciences CommitteeThe REC’s flagship Life Sciences sector group provides specialist support and advice to recruitment agencies working in a range of areas including pharmaceuticals, scientific research, biochemistry and biomedical technology.

After previously joining the committee as the Vice Chair, Ricky aims to further support the standards and professional in recruitment across the sciences. Moving forwards he aims to ensure there are more frequent communications on key topics surrounding the Life Sciences Sector to help further improve the standards across recruitment in this sector. 

The UK life Sciences sector generates a turnover of over £56 billion, is one of the strongest and most productive life sciences sectors in the world and employs over 160,000 people. It is therefore essential that we have a dedicated and specialist recruitment sector to support it. 

“Science saves lives! I intend to lead the committee, members and all life sciences recruiters in the UK, to ensure we do our best to support this. I look forward to working with you all. Please do not hesitate to reach out to me, should you ever need my support” Ricky Martin

About the REC

The Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) is the professional body for UK recruitment businesses. Established since 1930, representing 82% of the recruitment market place by value, the REC support their members by helping businesses find the people they need, while improving the standards and reputation of the recruitment industry. The REC lead the way in defining better recruitment standards and practice – this is imperative to building a world class jobs market. The REC work with recruiters that can make a real difference.

Bending or outright breaking the truth on your CV can be very tempting – after all, the science jobs market is intensely competitive - but is it possible to lie on your CV?

It isn't uncommon for people to lie on their CV, with some 38% of Britons having done it at least once, according to data referenced by Metro.

However, the truth is you really can't lie on your CV, and that bending the truth on your CV isn't really a good idea. Here are just some of the reasons why you should think again about lying on your CV:

The truth is often easy to find

We are in the Internet age, and it has never been easier for employers to do their own research into the various claims you make on your CV.

It may be easy to think that a ‘little white lie’ here or there will be glossed over. However, all that it takes for your credibility to be ruined is an employer discovering a mismatch between what your CV states and what is on your LinkedIn profile or elsewhere online.

As the saying goes, nothing ever completely disappears from the Internet, and traces of your employment history may be left online to trip you up in your career ambitions.

You might be ‘found out’ on the job 

Even if you secure the role with the help of a lie about something you claimed to be proficient in, the likelihood is that at some point, you will need to back up that claim.

This can lead to an incredibly awkward situation as you unsuccessfully attempt to ‘fake’ skills or experience that you don’t have, potentially ending in humiliation as you are forced to admit to the lie.

Avoiding the lie in the first place is an infinitely better idea. If there is a certain skill or qualification that you wish you had, it’s better to work towards this and mention it on your CV, than to be anything less than absolutely truthful.

It could ruin your reputation

A reputation for integrity and honesty can be so hard to earn, and so easily lost. What’s more, the adverse impact can extend well beyond you being unable to secure a specific job.

Your reputation, after all, is hugely important when you are seeking any job, and if employers have any reason to question your ethics and integrity, they may wonder what else you may lie about on the job, which could imperil their entire company’s reputation.

News of your deceitfulness can quickly spread online and between different companies in your sector – so don’t take the risk.

You could lose your job

If there’s anything worse than not getting your dream job, it is surely getting that job, only to lose it because of a lie you told.

Employers don’t take lying lightly, and you could very easily find yourself back in the dole queue if any lie of yours is discovered. In the most severe cases – such as if the job legally required you to have a particular qualification that you lied about having – you could even face legal action.

Yes, many very successful people have lied on their CVs – ranging from former Yahoo chief executive Scott Thompson to media tycoon David Geffen – but that doesn’t mean you should follow their examples, especially when – as The Telegraph explains – their misdeeds so often ended badly.

Don’t put yourself in the awkward position of having something to hide – instead, tell the truth on your CV for the ultimate peace of mind. Remember that here at leading science recruitment agency Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we can advise you on how to construct a winning CV that won’t leave you feeling the need to be untruthful in the first place. 

Chemical Engineer

Chemical engineering is in many ways the archetypal science job, right down to the traditional white lab coat. It is also a very stimulating field of work; writing in the Guardian, Samantha Tyson of the Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE) described chemical engineering as “all about turning raw materials into useful, everyday products”.

Qualified chemical engineers can also look forward to decent remuneration - a recent IChemE salary survey found that starting wages average somewhere in the region of £29,500 per year. More experienced chartered chemical engineers can expect to earn as much as £70,000, or even higher in certain industries (such as oil and contracting).

But how does one become a chemical engineer in the first place?

As with other science jobs, you need the right characteristics.

Don't be fooled too much by the 'chemical' bit of this particular job title - if you wish to become a chemical engineer, strong mathematical abilities are just as important as a firm grasp of chemistry. According to Tyson, maths, physics and chemistry are the most common A-levels taken by chemical engineering students.

But you will also need many other, often more general skills and attributes to secure a job in chemical engineering. These range from project and resource management skills and oral and written communication skills to analytical skills, problem solving, and the ability to work as part of a team.

Graduates seeking chemical engineering jobs will also be expected to possess strong IT skills, commercial and business awareness and the capacity to motivate and lead a team.

What qualifications will you require?

You won't normally be able to secure a role as a chemical engineer unless you have a BEng degree or a BTEC HNC or HND in chemical or process engineering. Admission to a chemical engineering degree course generally depends on you having at least five A*-C GCSEs, as well as two A-levels (including maths and at least one science subject).

If you lack maths and science qualifications, some universities offer a foundation year to help get you up to speed. As always, you should double-check the exact entry requirements with individual colleges.

It can be advantageous for those wishing to build an especially lucrative career in chemical engineering to also possess a master's degree (MEng) in addition to a first degree in chemical engineering. Those with a degree in a different branch of engineering (or a related subject such as chemistry or polymer science) may opt to take an MSc postgraduate degree in chemical or process engineering to boost their career prospects.

Chemical engineering is an extremely diverse field of work.

It's difficult to sum up everything that chemical engineers do in just a few lines. Depending on the exact role and sector in which you work, you may find yourself...

  • Designing plant and equipment configuration
  • Setting up scale-up and scale-down processes
  • Assessing options for plant expansion
  • Applying new technologies and researching new products
...among an incredibly wide range of other potential duties.

There are plenty of opportunities for progression, too. According to the National Careers Service, these include becoming a senior process or design engineer; progressing into a research and development manager role; or becoming a plant manager or overall operations manager. Consultancy work is another option.

Remember that Hyper Recruitment Solutions is a leading science recruitment agency serving those on the lookout for all manner of engineering roles, including process or chemical engineering. Click through to learn more about our in-depth expertise in this area.

Relationships - both personal and professional - are a fact of life, and if you wish to make the swiftest progress up the science career ladder, you will almost certainly need to cultivate harmonious relationships with those of relevance to your chosen sector. 

Of course, we serve those seeking roles in any of a broad range of science sectors here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, from biotechnology and pharmacology to energy and medical devices.

But in a world in which - according to one study shared on LinkedIn - as many as 85% of jobs are filled via networking, there are undoubted benefits to expanding your range of science-related contacts beyond simply signing up with a leading recruitment agency.

Here are some tips on how to do it.

Focus on quality, not just quantity

It's easy for many people attracted to the mystique of networking to think it's about little more than building a long list of contacts. However, what really matters is the quality of those contacts and how well connected you are to them. 

The best contacts aren't just those who have heard a rumour about a job opening at X company or Y company, or any other random person. Instead, they're the people who can give you useful and current information and additional relevant contacts. They are likely to be able to give you informed advice, in addition to meaningful assistance with your applications for science jobs.

But think, too, about how tight and personal the bond is with the most potentially useful contacts you already have. Do you know their name, job title and specific areas of interest? What about their educational history or family?

If you can get in phone contact with that contact and receive a positive, receptive response to whatever you ask them, they are a useful contact. Otherwise, they are simply one more name in your database.

Treat contacts with respect

Do you treat your contacts as potential allies - people who you listen to and who you can help with their own pain points, rather than merely people who can give you what they want? Your message to your contacts should be that you value them highly and - ideally - want to support and help them.

After all, showing respect to your contacts will maximise the likelihood that they respond in kind.

Part of this process should be being clear about what you want from that contact before approaching them, so that you do not waste their - or your - time. What kind of science job are you looking for, and what kind of boss are you seeking? Is this a person who is likely to help you, given your answers to the aforementioned questions?

Be patient and appreciative

Cultivating a contacts list that will actually help you to secure that longed-for science job will require a lot of patience and appreciation. Make sure you express your gratitude by personally thanking those who give you any form of help with your job search, and don't forget to 'check in' periodically and attempt to reciprocate with your own assistance, if you can.

According to one recent survey of US adults by Pew Research Center, 66% used connections with close friends or family in their most recent job search, while 63% used professional or work connections and 55% used acquaintances or friends of friends.

Clearly, then, networking looks unlikely to become any less important in the job search process any time soon. So, why not create what may prove to be one of your most crucial contacts of all, by making use of our considerable expertise in any of a vast range of science industries here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions?

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