It can’t be denied that we are in a very social media-oriented world these days – indeed, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), a whopping 91% of online adults aged 16-24 use social networks.

However, while social media undoubtedly brings you many opportunities to present yourself to great advantage when seeking science jobs, it also brings very real risks to your online reputation.

We’ve probably all heard stories about that relative, friend or friend of a friend who lost or struggled to get a job due to that controversial tweet or compromising Facebook photo. So, can you do to ‘clean up’ your social media presence for job seeking?

Take more control over profile privacy

The most popular social networks tend to offer all manner of settings for controlling the privacy of what we share. However, many of us simply leave the settings at their defaults, not realising how much we might be sharing with the whole world. 

Facebook makes it easy for you to check how public your profile content is – just head to your profile, click the ‘...’ at the top and then select ‘View As...’ to see what your profile looks like to a random viewer. You may find yourself shocked and hastily deleting cringeworthy past posts.

As for future content you post, it’s a good rule of thumb to presume everything you share will be public unless you have altered the settings – whether on an account or post-by-post basis – to restrict its audience.  

Pay particular attention to your photos

Research reported in the Daily Mail found that “unflattering photographs” topped the list of Britons’ common Internet regrets, followed by “raucous, drunken photos”.

The 2,000 social media users quizzed by Custard Online Marketing also admitted to thinking twice about “vain selfies”, “photos of me, doing things I shouldn’t have done” and “photos of me in skimpy clothing/underwear”.

If all of the above suggests anything, it’s that we certainly care about how the images we share online affect how others perceive us. If that’s the case, you can certainly expect science recruitment agencies and employers to care about how your own image would reflect on them, so you should take the time to monitor your photos.

While it is often now possible on social media to control other people’s ability to tag you in photos, that doesn’t mean the photos don’t exist. So if you see an image that you wish to have removed, ask the person who posted it or get in touch with that social network’s support team.

Regularly Google yourself

You can almost guarantee that someone – whether a potential employer, friend, family member or acquaintance – has Googled your name in the past. What will a science employer see if they Google your name right now? Is there anything – including in the video and images sections – that might deter them from giving you an offer?

This is why you should routinely Google yourself to ensure that your online presence remains squeaky clean, not least as there may be content posted about you on other social networks.

Again, if you see something that might not be acceptable, you may be able to have it removed simply by appealing to whoever first posted it. On other occasions, that may not be possible, but there’s no harm in trying.

With one People Management report suggesting that about a third of employers have rejected candidates on the basis of their social media profile, it’s clear that this isn’t an aspect of your online presence you can overlook.

While cleaning up your social media presence, it’s also vital to ensure you have the right science recruitment agency by your side to assist you with your job search. Contact Hyper Recruitment Solutions now about our Candidate Commitment that outlines what we can do to help you find your dream science role.  


Bioinformatics is far from the best-known field of science jobs, but it is a steadily emerging and increasingly important one. It has been described in various ways, including – by the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry at Yale University – as “the application of computational techniques to analyse the information associated with biomolecules on a large-scale”.

A perhaps simpler way to understand it is as an amalgamation of biology, IT and computer science into a single subject. With ‘big data’ now ubiquitous across a wide range of industries, including life sciences research, scientists with computer science know-how are well-placed to take advantage of the ever-increasing breadth of career opportunities in the burgeoning bioinformatics sector.

What do bioinformaticists do?

Another way to describe the chief task of a bioinformaticist is as the logging, coding and/or retrieval of all biological information – especially proteins, DNA and mRNA – in an easily accessible format.

At the most basic level, a bioinformaticist is responsible for creating and maintaining databases of biological information. The majority of such databases consist of nucleic acid sequences and the protein sequences derived from them.

However, the most challenging bioinformatics tasks involve the analysis of sequence information, encompassing not only the discovery of the genes in DNA sequences but also the development of methods to predict the structure and/or function of newly found proteins and structural RNA sequences.

Such duties as the clustering of protein sequences into families, the alignment of similar proteins and the generation of phylogenetic trees are also central to the work of the best-qualified bioinformatics professionals.

Why is bioinformatics becoming so relevant?

It seems that there has never been a greater amount of biological data being generated than there is now, with the point at which biology, statistics and computer science cross bringing an abundance of new and exciting opportunities. Sure enough, professionals with experience of identifying, compiling, analysing and visualising huge amounts of biological and healthcare information have also never been in greater demand.

The flowering of bioinformatics as its own field has been attributed in part to a change in how industry and academia perceive it. As one bioinformatics professor, Wim Van Criekinge, has observed in an article by Science magazine: “Scientists and companies used to look at bioinformatics as a tool... but the subject has evolved from a service, like histology, to its own research arena... bioinformaticists are now the motor of the innovation.”

What are the main bioinformatics employers?

Those seeking rewarding bioinformatics roles are well-advised to look towards Cambridge, where several of the big research institutes in this field, including the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute, can be found.

However, candidates with bioinformatics skills are also regularly recruited by big pharmaceutical companies such as AstraZeneca and GlaxoSmithKline. Finally, there are also various smaller firms making use of bioinformatics, including those involved in personal care products, industrial organisms and agricultural applications.

Whatever the bioinformatics role to which you aspire may be – perhaps as a bioinformatician, biostatistician, head of bioinformatics or any of a broad range of other jobs – we can help you to find and secure it here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

Learn more about the depth of specialist expertise that we can offer to bioinformatics candidates, as well as the relevant available jobs for which you can apply right now. 

The latest statistics point to a job market that saw steady rather than spectacular progress in 2016. The Office for National Statistics’ recently released UK labour market report shows that there were 31.8 million people in work as of September to November last year, an improvement by 294,000 on a year earlier.

However, time invariably marches on, with many candidates for science jobs and their potential employers now turning their attentions firmly to 2017. What are some of the trends that will likely define the science recruitment market in the year ahead?

1.    A culture of engagement

As the CIPD’s Employee Outlook report for autumn 2016 has stated, while the UK’s net job satisfaction has improved since spring 2016 – now sitting at +40 – this is still some way short of the +48 recorded for autumn 2015.

As a result, it’s fair to say that most science organisations could probably improve their engagement strategies, which looks likely to be a key focus in the coming 12 months. More engaged employees will be more effective brand ambassadors, which will significantly aid your recruitment drive.

2.    The continued primacy of mobile

According to Pew Research Center, 28% of all Americans have used a smartphone to search for a job, rising to 53% of those aged between 18 and 29 – and you can bet that similar trends are continuing to hold sway on this side of the Atlantic.

It therefore couldn’t be more important to continue the optimisation of your science organisation’s online presence for mobile users. If potential candidates visit your site via their smartphone or tablet and find it inaccessible, slow-loading or difficult to navigate, they are unlikely to remain for long.

3.     Workplace diversity remains crucial

The benefits of more diverse workforces are well-documented, but nonetheless bear repeating. Firms with greater diversity in their personnel are more adaptable, can offer a broader range of skills and experiences and deliver better overall results.  

Management consultancy McKinsey & Company, for example, found that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity were 15% more likely to financially outperform those in the bottom quartile . For ethnic diversity, the figure was 35%. 

4.     Treating the candidate like a customer

That term that has been mentioned so often in recruitment circles in the last few years – ‘candidate experience’ – certainly won’t go away in 2017. In fact, science employers will need to make even more of an effort to make candidates feel as pampered as a customer, throughout the recruitment process, if they are to lure the biggest talent.

With Millennial and Generation Z jobseekers notoriously impatient compared to those before them, more emphasis is set to be placed on a swift and efficient candidate experience than ever before.

5.     Centring an employer brand around the employee

With so many avenues through which disgruntled (or for that matter, contented) current or former employees of your organisation can voice their true opinions of what it is like to work for your firm, it is becoming even harder to preserve a certain image of your organisation without your employees’ cooperation.

2017 will therefore be a year in which you need to be more alert than ever to manage your employer brand, in large part by cultivating the best possible working environment.

Are you a science employer looking to work with experts in such sectors as biotechnology, pharmacology and medical devices to secure the talent that your firm needs in the 12 months ahead? Talk to Hyper Recruitment Solutions about the wide-ranging, specialised and informed recruitment solutions on which we have built our reputation. 


With 100% of NHS trusts supporting opportunities for people to actively participate in clinical research according to the NHS National Institute for Health Research, it’s unsurprising that the field also offers many exciting science jobs for those in possession of a nursing, life sciences or medical sciences degree.

Clinical research associates are responsible for the coordination of clinical trials for new or current drugs, so that the benefits and risks of their use can be assessed. Employment is usually within a pharmaceutical firm or contract research organisation (CRO) working on behalf of pharmaceutical companies.

What are a clinical research associate’s day-to-day duties?

The exact tasks that one can be expected to perform in this role depend on the employer, but typically range from the writing of drug trial methodologies (procedures) and the identification and briefing of appropriate trial investigators (clinicians) to monitoring the progress of a trial and writing reports.

Clinical research associates also often need to present trial protocols to a steering committee, identify and assess which facilities are suitable for use as clinical trial sites, ensure that all unused trial supplies are accounted for and close down trial sites on the completion of a trial, among many other possible responsibilities.  

As stated by Rebecca, one clinical research associate profiled in a case study on the website of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, “No two days are the same. Every compound and every study is different, so each one has unique areas you need to look at.”

What qualities are required for this role?  

There is a wide range of attributes that tend to lend themselves well to a clinical research associate career, including a confident, outgoing personality, an ability to work independently and take initiative, teamwork, tact, attention to detail and good organisational and time management skills.

Great written and oral communication skills are also a must for building effective relationships with trial centre staff and colleagues, as is an enjoyment of travel, given the great amount of time that those in this job can expect to spend out of the office visiting trials.

What qualifications are needed?

To secure a role as a clinical research associate, you will almost certainly need to have a degree or postgraduate qualification in nursing, life sciences or medical sciences. This covers such subjects as anatomy, biochemistry, chemistry, immunology, pharmacology or physiology.

Those lacking a degree or who only possess an HND are unlikely to be able to break into this field. It may occasionally be possible for them to start in an administrative role – as a clinical trials administrator or NHS study-site coordinator, for example. However, even in this instance, considerable experience – if not also additional qualifications – would be required to progress.

Is a job as a clinical research associate right for me?

Those with a suitable science background who are interested in a role involving a high level of interaction with people and plenty of travel – potentially internationally – are likely to find a clinical research associate role highly rewarding.

However, this job does also have its negative aspects, including tight deadlines and a high degree of pressure, so it is important to consider whether you would thrive in this kind of environment – as well as whether you have the time management skills to look after what may be several trials simultaneously.

Finally, there is the matter of pay. With starting salaries of around £22,000 to £28,000, rising to as much as £60,000 in some senior roles, life as a clinical research associate can also bring decent monetary reward.

Start looking for the latest exciting clinical jobs here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions today, or enquire to our team to learn more about our highly informed and specialised science recruitment services. We can be your partner on your journey to success in your new science career. 


Having a job offer in your hand is an exciting moment to say the least. You’ve worked so long and hard to get it, and now, you’re in a position of what may feel like relatively rare control in your hunt for a lucrative and rewarding science role.

So, do you simply accept the offer?

Not necessarily. While the graduate job market undoubtedly remains an intensely competitive one – a recent report by The Telegraph suggesting there are still 39 applications for every graduate job – there are still some things that you should consider at this stage if you are to avoid making a decision you’ll regret.

Take a few deep breaths

Despite what may be your great eagerness for the role that may tempt you to accept the job offer by phone as soon as it is communicated to you, it’s highly recommended to get the offer in writing, not least so that you can examine the entire offer and all of its terms.

As with anything else that involves signing on a dotted line, it’s vital to know what you are committing to, which is why it’s also a good idea – if possible – to have a trusted advisor read the offer and give their opinion and guidance.

As alluded to above, this is an unusual stage of the job search process at which you really do have full control. Furthermore, the more professional and considered your response is to this job offer, the better it will reflect on you from the perspective of both your present and potential employer.  

Now could be a good time to negotiate

Sometimes, a job offer may not match your expectations – or you may have several offers from which to choose. You may therefore be in a position to negotiate that you will hardly ever encounter again in your career.

When contemplating and preparing a counter-offer, you should consider a wide range of factors relating to the offer presently in your hand, from the annual salary or hourly rate, right through to location, holiday time, training opportunities and whether you will be given a company car.

Naturally, your exact list of considerations will depend on the exact position and responsibilities and your personal priorities. The University of Brighton Careers Service has a useful and comprehensive guide to what else you should think about when evaluating a job offer.

Take care in your transition from your old role

As intimidating as it might be to approach your boss and tell them that you are leaving, this is a crucial professional courtesy to provide to your present employer.

It is certainly in your interests to make the transition as smooth and as amicable as possible, not just because of the potential implications for your professional reputation, but also because you can never guarantee that you won’t one day work for the same manager again.  

Once the formalities of notifying your present employer have been dealt with, it’s a good idea to send your new manager and HR manager a ‘thank you’ note and attend your new workplace in person as soon as possible. This will help to show your enthusiasm and eagerness to get started in the new role.

Finally, don’t forget to inform any other potential employers that have presented you with an offer of your decision, so that they can know at the earliest stage you have ruled yourself out of consideration.

Could our high-level know-how in such specialised science fields as biotechnology, pharmacology and CRO/CMO make all of the difference when you are on the lookout for the perfect role? Contact Hyper Recruitment Solutions today to learn more about our full suite of services as a science recruitment agency.  

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