Job hunting

'Twas the build-up to Christmas and all 'cross the nation, jobseekers everywhere grow mad with frustration...

It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas throughout the UK, as houses glow bright with sparkly decorations and the airwaves once again become flooded with festive tunes.

With that, offices and workplaces around the country are also beginning to gear up for the holiday, as eager eyes focus on the well-deserved Christmas break on the impending horizon.

Unfortunately for job hunters, this joyous noel can result in a less joyous no-reply for job applications, as hiring trends and recruitment activities often get put on hold until the new year.

That being said, it's important to remember that, while Christmas is undoubtedly a time of giving, it's definitely not a time for giving up.

In fact, Christmas can be the perfect opportunity to get ahead of the January/February boom period...

 

Why Job Hunt Over Christmas?

As alluded to above, the new year is often the most popular time for recruitment as candidates and companies refocus their attention on finding work and finding workers respectively.

That being said, there's definitely a sizeable upside to job hunting at Christmas and numerous benefits to sending off job applications during the festive season.

 

Less Competition

While there may be less emphasis on hiring during the tail-end of the year, waiting for the January boom period to apply for vacancies can cause you to get lost in the shuffle.

Increased competition from other applicants also applying during the new year means that, by waiting until January, you are effectively increasing your chances of slipping by unnoticed.

Think of it as doing the weekly grocery shop during peak times on a Saturday. Congested aisles can lead you to miss some great deals and overlook some quality products - the same principle applies to recruitment.

 

More Vacancies

In addition to being a better time to apply in terms of getting a leg up on the competition, the Christmas period can also present an increase in the number of job vacancies as well.

It's not unusual for people leaving their jobs to finish up their roles in the run-up to Christmastime, as a means of extending their Christmas break. As a result, there can often be a spike in vacancies prior to the Christmas break.

Getting in early on these vacancies could prove fruitful as many jobs will include a condition on their job ad noting they reserve the right to close the ad early, should they find the right person for the job.

 

Budget Deadlines

 

For companies working with an annual budget, the end of the calendar year can often leave employers with a pot of change left over before the year is out.

In order to avoid budget cuts the following year, a "use it or lose it" mentality can take over and such businesses will move to spend their allotted hiring funds prior to New Year's Day.

Should the stars align, this enhanced focus on recruitment can be the perfect way to help you find your very own Christmas miracle in the form of securing a new job.

 

Temporary Work

Job hunting over Christmas doesn't always mean applying for the role of your dreams or the next logical step in your career development.

For some, finding a job can be as simple as finding ANY job, especially if such a search comes after an unfortunate lay-off or unforeseen restructure.

As such, it may be worth taking advantage of the numerous Christmas jobs available during this festive period.

While they may not present a comparable salary or an in-road to the next step on your career path, it will help you to cope financially.

Meanwhile, who's to say your Christmas job won't take a life of its own and develop into a career long after the festive season is over?

 

So, there you have it: don't just sit back and raise a glass this Christmastime; raise your game and put your job hunt into overdrive - it could pay off big!

For more information on job hunting at Christmas or to hear more job search advice, why not speak with one of our expert advisors today? Call now on 0203 225 5120 or get in touch online by clicking the button below.

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Finding attracting motivated applicants and qualified candidates in a cost-effective and timely manner is the dream scenario for any company looking to acquire new talent.

Sadly, ticking all of those boxes in one fell swoop is far more difficult than it seems on paper. Luckily, help is at hand and it comes to you right here, courtesy of those in the know!

 

best recruitment process

 

How to Achieve the Best Recruitment Process

To help you navigate the road to recruitment without any unnecessary detours, we've put together a list of helpful hints and tips to allow you to achieve the best recruitment process possible.

 

Identify Your Needs

Knowing what want is the key to achieving it, so it's important to have a good idea of what you're looking for before you get started.

Outside of the title your recruiting for, think what the role and responsibilities will entail – your ideal candidate will need to have these in droves.

Next, think about what additional qualities you would like your new acquisition to possess, along with any other ideal attributes.

The old adage of "if you don't ask, you don't get" rings true in recruitment and a structured person spec with essentials and desirables will help you bag the perfect applicant.

 

Advertising Route

There are a wide variety of avenues to go down when it comes to marketing your job vacancy, each with their own pros and cons, so it's worth considering which ways you want to explore.

Advertising your vacancy internally is going to be excellent in terms of time and money spent; however, it naturally excludes the world outside your office walls.

Meanwhile, some recruiters may favour sites like LinkedIn and Facebook, as their chosen method of job marketing. While this may seem logical in today's culture of social media, it doesn't always reach the chosen demo of those actively seeking employment.

Perhaps the best route is the most obvious: hitting the online job boards. Job sites are purpose-built to cater for job seekers and have a ready-made audience waiting for vacancies just like yours to crop up.

Similarly, if your job targets a specialism, you may want to approach an agency that caters specifically for that market of skilled professionals, much like HRS caters heavily to scientists and those within the industry of science.

 

Clear Criteria

When it comes to sifting through the applications, a tall stack of CVs can be a daunting task that's just as time-consuming.

In order to streamline what could be a lengthy process, go back to your initial job ad and remind yourself exactly what and who you are looking for.

Breezing by the person spec to remind yourself will give you a clear idea of the skills and experience your ideal applicant should possess.

Keep your checklist of criteria fresh in mind when going through the CVs to help you efficiently whittle down the field and arrive at your final shortlist of candidates.

 

Prepare for Interview

Just as you would expect a candidate to come to the interview fully-prepared, you too should take the very same approach.

An unprepared interview with very little direction achieves nothing for anyone and can create a bad first impression of your company to the interviewee. Have a solid idea of how you want the interview to progress with key questions and topics in mind.

Similarly, ensure all attendees are on the same page and clued up on what's what. Hauling an unprepped colleague into the meeting room last minute is a waste of everyone's time and can come back to haunt you.

Remember, the recruitment process works both ways. If the candidate doesn't feel your company is the right fit for them, they may not want to pursue the vacancy further even if they are offered the job.

 

For more recruitment advice and tips on achieving an efficient recruitment process, why not drop us a line today? Call now on 0203 225 5120 to speak with one our specialists or get in touch online using the button below.

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Many scientific jobs are based in laboratories, and even if you've experienced a lab environment in school or university, you might well wonder what it's like to actually work in a lab.

Working in a lab

Here are some of the best and worst things about working in a lab:

 

Lab equipment is expensive and delicate

In case you didn't already know, laboratory equipment tends to be pretty expensive. If you happen to be a bit on the clumsy side, you may find yourself racking up quite the replacement bill if you're not careful. Most science work requires concentration and precision, so take it easy if around the most delicate equipment if these aren't your strong points.

 

Your social life may have to take a back seat

When working in a lab, you commit yourself to the experiments you take on. Unfortunately, this can mean that your working hours become somewhat irregular, and other social activities have to be put on hold. Be prepared for your work schedule to be a bit changeable!

 

Your work can be dangerous

When you talk to your friends who maybe work within the construction industry or in factories, you may hear them say how dangerous their line of work is and how they could have an accident at any given time. When you work in a lab, the same thing applies to you! Working with infectious agents, caustic chemicals and electrified apparatus can put your health and safety in major danger, so be careful!

 

You actually have to dress like a scientist

You've most likely seen a load of lab work in movies or on TV, where the workers are dressed in long white coats with huge safety goggles protecting their faces. This is surprisingly true to real life - lab coats and goggles are part of the uniform, primarily because of the health and safety concerns mentioned above.

If you're looking for lab-based work, Hyper Recruitment Solutions can help you! Click the link below to browse the latest scientific from all over the UK!

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Manufacturing jobs

The onward march of technology has long been a double-edged sword in terms of its effect on employment.

On the one hand, technological advancement has created entirely new industries and led to increased efficiency, rapid production, and streamlining of the workplace in general.

On the other hand, automation has made a lot of formerly essential jobs obsolete, and those job losses will only become more widespread as the fields of AI and robotics continue to break new ground.

It's easy to see why so many people are looking for new lines of work that simply could not exist without human workers. So which jobs are safe from automation? And which are most at risk?

Jobs most at risk from automation

A 2017 report by consultancy firm McKinsey Global Institute projected that up to 800 million workers across the globe will lose their jobs to robots by 2030, noting that machine operators and food workers are likely to take the brunt of the hit.

While that may be a shocking statistic, technology reshaping the workplace is nothing new. In fact, it’s been a vital part of our evolution as a species - as time goes by, old jobs become redundant and new jobs become available that would have been inconceivable a few decades prior. The matchstick makers and lamplighters of yore couldn't possibly have imagined that their descendants would be designing websites, testing video games, and developing machine-learning algorithms for search engines.

Over the last half-century, however, jobs have been erased by technological advancement at an alarmingly fast pace. From switchboard operators to railway ticket sellers and the litany of factory jobs in between, it seems that no line of work is completely without risk of automation - even McDonald’s is creeping closer to fully-automated ordering with the growing influx of self-service machines.

But let’s not throw in the towel just yet. There are still plenty of vocations left that require a human touch!

What jobs are safe from automation?

According to BusinessInsider.com, the top 10 jobs least likely to become automated are almost exclusively health and social care role, with occupational therapists topping the list. Social workers are not far behind, closely followed by dentists, physicians, surgeons and nutritionists.

Outside of healthcare, creative jobs like choreography and exhibit designers also rank highly on the list. Creeping into the wider top 20, counselling and psychology roles rank well, as does teaching, while medical health and medical science are also fairly safe from the creeping threat of automation.

Industries likeliest to remain safe from automation

An Oxford University study titled The Future of Employment provides a great deal of insight into what human employment will look like in the future and, more importantly, the areas where human brains are most crucial.

Overall, healthcare and social sciences are the industries least likely to be automated in the foreseeable future. The human aspects of therapy and social care make these sectors relatively inaccessible for artificial intelligences. Boasting seven of the top ten jobs in the list, it seems that a career in healthcare is a fairly safe bet that shouldn’t see too much change in the foreseeable future.

Similarly, the emotional connection that's needed in the education sector also seems likely to ensure a steady future for teachers. Art & Design, Sport & Entertainment and Media are three other avenues that require individualistic input that is hard to replace with technology.

Skills needed for the jobs of the future

So what skills are most likely to secure steady employment in the future? Many industry experts point to three notable attributes:

  • Creativity - The expressive nature of creative jobs is not something that can be digitally automated, making proficiency in this a true asset that’s virtually future-proof.

  • Emotional intelligence - Empathy and emotional understanding are human characteristics that are notably absent in machines, safeguarding roles where human interaction is paramount. This is a big part of why healthcare professionals and social workers are unlikely to be replace by robots any time soon.

  • STEM proficiency - STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. These complex fields are relatively safe from automation, so a science or engineering degree should stand you in good stead for the future.

Looking for a career in the science or technology industries? Click the link below to browse vacancies from all over the UK!

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Lab Technician

When you hear the phrase 'lab technician', you probably picture the medical laboratory technicians you've seen gazing into microscopes and exchanging quips with the doctors on TV shows like House, Scrubs and Grey's Anatomy.

But lab technicians aren't exclusively found in hospitals - they work in all sorts of different industries, from energy to manufacturing. Indeed, 'laboratory technician' is a fairly broad term that can apply to just about anyone who works with scientific equipment in a lab environment.

Lab Technician Job Description

As you'd expect, lab technicians work almost entirely within laboratories, where they carry out a range of tasks, tests and experiments. This could mean:

  • Analysing DNA samples for the police
  • Diagnosing diseases in a hospital
  • Testing foodstuffs to make sure they're safe for consumption
  • Developing new technologies and solutions
In addition to performing tests/experiments and recording the results, laboratory technicians are often responsible for the running and maintenance of the lab itself, too. A lab technician's more humdrum tasks might include cleaning test tubes, taking inventory, and labelling key items for ease of identification.

Job Requirements

In order to land yourself a lab technician job, you will generally need a degree in a relevant discipline (e.g. Molecular Biology if you will be working with DNA samples).

As ever, relevant experience will make you more attractive to potential employers, but you will also need to prove that you possess the skills/knowledge necessary to carry out the tasks that will be assigned to you.

Salary

The average lab technician in the UK makes around £21,000 per year, but as with most roles, salaries vary depending on experience and line of work. Some laboratory technicians make upwards of £30,000 per year.

If you'd like to see some more specific lab technician job descriptions, please use the link below to browse the latest lab tech vacancies from Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

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