Many scientific jobs are based in laboratories, and even if you've experienced a lab environment in school or university, you might well wonder what it's like to actually work in a lab.

Working in a lab

Here are some of the best and worst things about working in a lab:

 

Lab equipment is expensive and delicate

In case you didn't already know, laboratory equipment tends to be pretty expensive. If you happen to be a bit on the clumsy side, you may find yourself racking up quite the replacement bill if you're not careful. Most science work requires concentration and precision, so take it easy if around the most delicate equipment if these aren't your strong points.

 

Your social life may have to take a back seat

When working in a lab, you commit yourself to the experiments you take on. Unfortunately, this can mean that your working hours become somewhat irregular, and other social activities have to be put on hold. Be prepared for your work schedule to be a bit changeable!

 

Your work can be dangerous

When you talk to your friends who maybe work within the construction industry or in factories, you may hear them say how dangerous their line of work is and how they could have an accident at any given time. When you work in a lab, the same thing applies to you! Working with infectious agents, caustic chemicals and electrified apparatus can put your health and safety in major danger, so be careful!

 

You actually have to dress like a scientist

You've most likely seen a load of lab work in movies or on TV, where the workers are dressed in long white coats with huge safety goggles protecting their faces. This is surprisingly true to real life - lab coats and goggles are part of the uniform, primarily because of the health and safety concerns mentioned above.

If you're looking for lab-based work, Hyper Recruitment Solutions can help you! Click the link below to browse the latest scientific from all over the UK!

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Science jobs for students

Are you studying for some sort of science degree at the moment?

We know how hard it can be to find a job while you're a student (and immediately after you graduate), so in this blog, we'll talk you through some different science student job options that you might want to consider pursuing.

While you study

As a science student, there are lots of job opportunities you can take advantage of in tandem with your studies. Some of the best science student jobs include:

  • Internships

  • Volunteering at your university

  • A year in industry

There are lots of scientific companies - including engineering companies, science journals, research departments and more - who offer both paid and unpaid job opportunities to students. Even if these vacancies aren't advertised online, it's always worth enquiring!

You'll have to choose whether to work alongside your studies during term time or for longer periods over the summer holidays. Think carefully about how much time you need to dedicate to your studies and work from there. You don't want to let your studies suffer, no matter how beneficial work experience might be!

Whatever student job you choose to pursue will look great on your CV in the long term. Dedicating your spare time to a science job not only shows that you're enthusiastic about your chosen field, it also shows a willingness to work and an ability to organise your time that other students may not demonstrate during their studies.

How can HRS help?

Here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we offer a comprehensive science recruitment service that is ideal for science students who have recently graduated from university. We can help you to find and apply for a science job with ease - use the links below to browse our latest vacancies or read more about what we have to offer science graduates!

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Future science jobs

'Science' is a very broad term that can cover all sorts of different careers, from storm chaser to venom milker. Sadly (or luckily, depending on your outlook), not all scientific jobs will involve such white-knuckle thrill-seeking or death-defying excitement.

Nevertheless, jobs in science can make for an excellent career path with many intriguing avenues to explore. Better still, with the entire science industry built on constant change and cutting-edge technologies, the future of science jobs is an exciting and potentially lucrative one, particularly if you choose one of the following fields...

Science jobs on the grow

If you're on the hunt for science jobs, you're probably familiar with the term STEM – an acronym relating to jobs within science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Many STEM jobs are hugely important in modern society, and that's likely to remain the case for a very long time to come.

With one eye constantly on the road ahead, science is an industry that holds much promise for the future, so it’s only fitting that the future should also hold much promise for jobs in science. In fact, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labour Statistics, there are certain areas of scientific employment that are predicted to have a very healthy upswing indeed by 2024.

Forensic Science Technician

Glamorised by TV shows like CSI, NCIS and Dexter, the presence of forensic science on the small screen has made a career in this field a rather attractive proposition in recent years – and it’s easy to see why. Arguably one of the meatier jobs on this list, the role of Forensic Science Technician has a number of specialist sub-categories, including DNA, textile fibres and toxicology.

The work itself, however, is somewhat less glamorous than what’s presented on television, typically requiring you to analyse crime scene evidence and summarise your findings in a written report. For this role, you will likely need at least a BSc in Forensic Science or Chemistry and first-hand work experience to boot.

Atmospheric Scientist

One of the more adaptable roles on this list, a job as an Atmospheric Scientist can have you working in a variety of fields relating to the atmosphere. This role could see you studying meteorology and weather, but you might just as easily end up working in public health, focusing on air quality and the impact of pollution.

In order to be considered for a job in Atmospheric Science, you will first need to obtain a degree in – you guessed it – Atmospheric Science. This will provide the opportunity to apply for entry-level positions; however, for the best chance of securing a role in this field, a master’s degree or PhD will give you an extra advantage over other candidates.

Geoscientist

Further delving into the geographical science path, Geoscience investigates the topographical features of the Earth. As a Geoscientist, you can’t be afraid to get your hands dirty because you could find yourself working with soil, rocks and other natural resources in the study of the Earth’s composition.

Often dealing with natural resources such as gas, oil and water, Geoscientists are frequently employed in the energy industry, as well as sectors such as water management, etc. There are also a variety of sub-categories relating to particular specialities, ranging from geophysicist to geochemist and many more in between.

In order to become a Geoscientist, you will likely be required to have a BSc in engineering, physics or chemistry at the very least, while a master’s degree and relevant industry experience in the field is often preferable for employers.

Biomedical Engineer

Biomedical Engineers are tasked with analysing and designing solutions to issues within biology and medicine. This can often involve the design of various biomedical systems and products, including artificial body parts and machines for diagnosing medical problems, as well as a number of other duties surrounding biomedical equipment.

As one might expect, you will typically require a bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering in order to become a Biomedical Engineer; however, you may also be able to work within this field if you have a BSc in an alternate area of engineering, coupled with a graduate degree in biomedical engineering or relevant/adequate first-hand experience.

Computer and Information Systems Manager

A highly technical role of much importance within a business, a Computer and Information Systems Manager is tasked with managing an organisation’s computer activity, taking the reins for all the hardware and software decisions of a company.

As this is a managerial position, you may also have to oversee the other IT personnel on staff, as well as being responsible for the company’s network security. For this role, you will typically need to be educated to degree level in Computer and Information Science and have several years of relevant work experience in support of that degree.

So there you have it: if you’re looking to enter the world of science with a career that will last long into the future, these five future jobs in science are well worth aiming for.

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Science jobs no degree

Are you passionate about pursuing a career in science, but unsure how to without a degree ?

Don't worry - although lots of science jobs do require you to have a degree, all hope is not lost. We have selected just some of the science jobs you can do without a degree to give you an insight into the type of work you may be able to get, but there are lots of other examples out there!

Nursing Assistant

If you've always aspired to work in a hospital, caring for people and working alongside highly-trained doctors and other medical professionals, this career path could be perfect for you. Nursing assistants help doctors and nurses with their duties, including feeding, cleaning and moving the patients whenever necessary.

Nursing assistants are also trained in basic medical care so that they can be of assistance during patient emergencies. Although you won't need a formal degree to apply for this type of job, you will need to:

  • Complete a nursing / caregiving education program of some sort
  • Pass a competency exam
  • Get some clinical work experience under your belt

If you love looking after people and thrive under pressure, why not consider becoming a nursing assistant? This can be a great stepping stone towards a more senior medical role in the future.

Laboratory Assistant

Many companies hire laboratory assistants to help senior members of staff, such as researchers, complete lengthy or difficult projects.

The perfect candidate for this job is a highly-organised individual who is capable of following precise instructions and willing to learn from others. As a lab assistant, you may be asked to:

  • Prepare laboratory equipment
  • Set up and carry out experiments
  • Clean the equipment afterwards

This type of role gives you a great insight into the inner workings of a laboratory and can be a great way of earning valuable experience that can be parlayed into a more advanced laboratory role later in life. Many laboratory technicians praise their jobs for being closely linked to 'real' science and thoroughly fascinating to boot!

Science Teacher for Young Children

If you don't mind putting on a bit of a show and bringing lots of energy to the workplace, why not consider being a science instructor for young children? Many jobs of this nature require you to have:

  • Some experience working with children
  • A science, maths or teaching background
  • Confidence when presenting and entertaining

This type of science job doesn't require you to have a degree, can be very rewarding, and may even be suitable for you if you're looking for a part-time position while you study towards a degree.

If none of these jobs take your fancy, don't worry - there are all sorts of other science jobs listed here on the Hyper Recruitment Solutions website. Click the link below to browse our latest vacancies!

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Immunoassay Jobs

Immunoassay is a biochemical assessment that measures the concentration or presence of a macromolecule in a solution through the use of an antibody or antigen. If and when detected, the molecule is referred to as an 'analyte' and can be a range of different molecules, all of different forms and sizes, as long as the sufficient properties for the assay are created. Analytes in biological liquids such as urine are regularly measured using immunoassays for medical and research purposes.

Immunoassays come in a variety of different formats. Some assays are known as multi-step assays and are deployed - just as their name suggests - in multiple steps, with reagents being added and washed away or separated at various times. These are also commonly referred to as heterogeneous immunoassays or separation immunoassays.

Another type of immunoassay is known as a homogeneous or non-separation immunoassay. Here, the immunoassay is performed by simply mixing the reagents and sample, creating a physical measurement.

Calibrators are often used during immunoassays. These are solutions that are known to contain the analyte being tested, with the concentration of that analyte generally known. Being able to compare an assay's response to a real sample against the assay's response as a result of a calibrator enables researchers to interpret the signal strength in terms of the concentration or presence of an analyte in the sample.


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Immunoassays play a vital role in various bioanalytical settings such as food testing, security, clinical diagnostics and environmental monitoring. Therefore, talented individuals are required to fill important roles within various scientific establishments in order to continue the development of IAs. Immunoassays have come a long way over the last few decades, with technologies and increased understanding drastically shortening the IA procedure. With continued support, IA can progress even further.

We work with a number of the very best scientific organisations in the country, who are constantly looking to recruit the best talent available. With our help, we are able to pair these employers with gifted individuals who are ready to take the next big step in their career.

Click the link below to view all current immunoassay job vacancies.

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