Molecular Biology

Molecular biology is a branch of biology that focuses on biomolecules within various cell systems (be they human, animal, plant or otherwise) and the interactions between those biomolecules.

Molecular Biology at University

Molecular biology undergraduate courses often combine elements of biochemistry, genetics, and microbiology into a single syllabus. This allows students to explore different areas of molecular biology while also giving them an opportunity to specialise in an area that's relevant to their chosen career path.

Pursuing a Career in Molecular Biology

In order to get a job as a molecular biologist, you will need a relevant life sciences degree, as well as (ideally) some relevant work experience in a laboratory environment.

What to expect:

  • Predominantly lab-based work
  • You will mostly be carrying out molecule- and cell-focused experiments
  • You may also be responsible for managing the laboratory

Areas of work you might be involved in:

  • Antibody engineering
  • Gene therapy
  • Plant research

The average starting salary for a molecular biologist is approximately £20k a year, with lots of potential for progression as you develop your skills and grow more experienced.

Are you looking to further your molecular biology career? Click the link below to view the latest jobs from Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

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Biostatistician

Biostatistics is the application of mathematics and statistics to biology and related fields. Biostatisticians are responsible for designing biological experiments in the medical and agricultural industries; they collect, analyse and translate raw data into relevant information that can be used for research purposes.

Biostatisticians are an essential part of any research team, and are frequently involved in all sorts of pioneering research. Their work uses theoretical and applied statistics in order to develop the science of data analysis past current levels.

Where do biostatisticians work?

Biostatisticians spend the majority of their time working at computers in an office setting. Here, they become familiar with the specialised software and programmes used to dissect data and findings that will be of use within their field. Often, they will collaborate with teams of researchers and scientists, and so a lot of time is spent interacting with other professionals to come to groundbreaking conclusions.

Some biostatisticians may be employed by academic institutions, such as universities, in which case they will spend some of their time in labs and classrooms.

A biostatistician will mostly work full-time on a normal daytime rota; however, extended hours may be required if a particular deadline is approaching.

What do biostatisticians get paid?

The average salary for a biostatistician is approximately £58,200 per year, although some make as much as £94,000 per year. The majority of biostatisticians work within a government setting or other special departments, while others work within educational and private finance companies.

What skills do biostatisticians need?

Although a biostatistician's specific responsibilities tend to depend on what industry they work in, the skills required are similar across the board. If hired as a biostatistician, you will likely be expected to:

  • Participate in the planning, collection, interpretation, and implementation of research

  • Participate in the extraction, storage, analysis and delivery of data to end users

  • Construct analysis methodologies and perform data analysis of data sets

  • Deliver statistical expertise and knowledge to internal and external stakeholders

  • Possess professional knowledge of mathematics, statistics and computer science

Senior biostatisticians may also be required to assist in the management of a department’s partnerships and budgets.

What qualifications do biostatisticians need?

In order to become a biostatistician, you will generally need a bachelor’s degree in statistics, mathematics or biostatistics. Experience in other subjects related to medicine and/or biology will also be of great benefit.

While many entry-level positions do exist for individuals holding a bachelor’s degree, most biostatisticians also possess a master’s degree or doctorate. These degrees help students to become more specialised and gain a greater experience in conducting research and presenting their findings.

Demand for skilled and talented individuals within the biostatistical industry is growing greater and greater as time goes on. Use the link below to browse the latest vacancies from Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

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Lab Technician

When you hear the phrase 'lab technician', you probably picture the medical laboratory technicians you've seen gazing into microscopes and exchanging quips with the doctors on TV shows like House, Scrubs and Grey's Anatomy.

But lab technicians aren't exclusively found in hospitals - they work in all sorts of different industries, from energy to manufacturing. Indeed, 'laboratory technician' is a fairly broad term that can apply to just about anyone who works with scientific equipment in a lab environment.

Lab Technician Job Description

As you'd expect, lab technicians work almost entirely within laboratories, where they carry out a range of tasks, tests and experiments. This could mean:

  • Analysing DNA samples for the police
  • Diagnosing diseases in a hospital
  • Testing foodstuffs to make sure they're safe for consumption
  • Developing new technologies and solutions
In addition to performing tests/experiments and recording the results, laboratory technicians are often responsible for the running and maintenance of the lab itself, too. A lab technician's more humdrum tasks might include cleaning test tubes, taking inventory, and labelling key items for ease of identification.

Job Requirements

In order to land yourself a lab technician job, you will generally need a degree in a relevant discipline (e.g. Molecular Biology if you will be working with DNA samples).

As ever, relevant experience will make you more attractive to potential employers, but you will also need to prove that you possess the skills/knowledge necessary to carry out the tasks that will be assigned to you.

Salary

The average lab technician in the UK makes around £21,000 per year, but as with most roles, salaries vary depending on experience and line of work. Some laboratory technicians make upwards of £30,000 per year.

If you'd like to see some more specific lab technician job descriptions, please use the link below to browse the latest lab tech vacancies from Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

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Microbiology

Microbiology is a burgeoning field, and microbiologists can earn upwards of £30,000 a year (depending on the nature of the role and the candidate's qualifications / experience level).

But what exactly does a microbiologist do? In order to answer that, let's start with a more basic question...

What is Microbiology?

Moicrobiology is the study of microscopic organisms (microorganisms) such as bacteria and viruses. There are many different branches of microbiology, including:

  • Bacteriology (the study of bacteria)
  • Virology (the study of viruses)
  • Mycology (the study of fungi)
  • Phycology (the study of algae)
Generally speaking, the term 'microbiology' can be applied to the study of any living organism that is too small to been with the naked eye.

So that's a rough overview of what microbiology is - now, let's return to our original question. What does a microbiologist do on an average working day?

Microbiologist Job Description

Microbiologists typically work within the medical and life science industries, but can be found in a variety of other sectors too. A degree in Microbiology or a closely-related discipline (e.g. Biomedical Science) tends to be the minimum requirement to enter this line of work, although this may not be mandatory for some junior positions.

As a microbiologist, you'll be spending most of your time in a laboratory, studying microorganisms with the aid of a microscope. If you find yourself working within the healthcare sector, you will most likely be working to understand and prevent different types of infection; elsewhere, you might be required to develop enzyme indicators or analyse biological samples.

Hyper Recruitment Solutions is a leading light in UK science recruitment. Use the link below to browse our latest microbiology vacancies, or create your candidate account here.

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Scientist Quiz

Nearly 7,000 people (and counting!) have taken Hyper Recruitment Solutions' What Type of Scientist Are You? quiz since we launched it earlier this year.

And who knows? Maybe we inspired some of those individuals to consider a career that had never even occurred to them before! For instance, have you ever thought about how your innate problem-solving skills might serve you well as a data scientist? Or how your love of animals might translate into a rewarding career in zoology?

If not, be sure to take the quiz yourself before you read on to find out what results everyone else has been getting!

The Most Popular Results

Science Quiz Results - Graph

As you can see, there's been a lot of variety in the results that people have been getting from our quiz - some people are clinical scientists, some are ecologists, and some are better suited to biochemistry.

The 3 most popular results are:

  1. Geologist (14.4% of people get this result)
  2. Astronomer (13.9% of people get this result)
  3. Physicist (13.4% of people get this result)

This suggests that there are a lot of people out there with analytical minds and a great love for going outdoors - these are qualities that mesh very well with a career in geology!

We've also seen a lot of people show an interest in unlocking the really big mysteries, like whether we're alone in the universe and indeed where the universe came from in the first place. These people would make great astronomers and physicians - the second and third most popular quiz results respectively.

The least popular result was Biologist - just 4.6% of our quiz-takers are best suited to a career in biology, but that's still more than 300 people!

Take the Quiz >   Browse Science Jobs >

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