STEM workers

STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. These disciplines are often referred to collectively, especially in government policies, education / employment statistics, and news articles - you've probably seen a lot of headlines like these:

STEM jobs were hardest to fill in 2016

Women still under-represented in STEM industries, report finds

New STEM education programme rolled out in selected schools

As you'll know if you've ever read any of the stories attached to those headlines, STEM as a whole has a lot of problems at the moment. Many organisations have great difficulty finding qualified workers to fill demanding science jobs, and in addition to the much-publicised lack of diversity in STEM fields, there simply aren't enough young people participating and pursuing a future in STEM, which means that the problems faced by these industries will likely get worse as time goes on.

But is that an issue for everyone else? Just how important is STEM to the world at large?

Why STEM should be important to everyone

The answer, of course, is that STEM is very, very important for the whole planet, and crucial to the continued prosperity of the human race. It hopefully goes without saying that modern society as we know it relies heavily on STEM industries and the talented workers within those industries. Here are just three examples:

  • Computers - The modern world relies on computers to an extent that would have been virtually unimaginable just a few decades ago. We use computers to talk to friends, do the shopping, listen to music, and learn about everything from the history of the world to the correct method for laying a floor. Computers tell us where to go and what's happening there. You probably use computers in any number of different ways over the course of an average day, and it's all because of skilled people in STEM roles who worked hard to make this possible.

  • Medicine - While it's unlikely that mankind will ever eradicate all diseases, it cannot be understated how much safer we all are today thanks to modern medicine. In the last century alone, talented STEM workers saved countless lives by curing smallpox and developing vaccines for polio, measles, diphtheria, and countless other illnesses. One expert has predicted that we will see a "sudden surge" in effective cancer treatments within the next five to ten years. At this very moment, countless people are living and breathing and going about their lives because of the medical advances made by STEM workers.

  • Transport - It's easy to take modern transportation systems for granted. Cars allow you to travel miles in minutes; railways keep entire countries connected; aeroplanes take thousands of people from one side of the world to the other every day. Once again, all of this is thanks to STEM visionaries who never stop working to bring the world closer together and create more and more efficient ways to get from A to B.

Image courtesy of pixabay.com.


You might think that you know what you're getting into with science and technology - fields like biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, telecommunications and engineering have existed seemingly since the year dot, so it can be easy for those contemplating science jobs to forget the truly 'living and breathing', continually evolving nature of science and technology.

For a reminder of just how exciting it can be to get picked by a science recruitment agency for a sought-after and important role, just consider the latest frontiers to which you could make an active contribution.

The effects on food crops of climate change

Climate change isn't just about the prospect of higher temperatures and us all ending up underwater - it's also about the very sustainability of our planet's food supply. Become a plant scientist, and you could play an instrumental role in the development of drought-resistant crop strains.

Transcatheter aortic valve implantation

Whereas the replacement of heart valves has traditionally been done by surgically opening the chest cavity, if the process is done by chest catheter, only a small incision is required. Since this was achieved by a French doctor in 2002, it has gained popularity across dozens of countries when faulty aortic valves need to be treated.

The acidification of the ocean

As the atmosphere of our planet becomes ever-more concentrated with carbon dioxide, so the amount of carbonic acid in our oceans is also increasing, decreasing the pH and even dissolving the shells or skeletons of some organisms. Scientists are still grappling to properly understand the evolving chemical composition of our oceans - but who is to say that you won't contribute to the next big breakthrough in this area?

Galileon cosmology

The universe has long held seemingly infinite mystery and fascination for scientists, who are still trying to explain not only why it is still getting bigger, but also doing so ever-quicker. Attempts to shed some light on the matter have included the modification of how we mathematically treat gravity's effects at greater distances, with the galileon scalar field enabling self-accelerating solutions.

Synthetic biology

This is one emerging scientific field that even many laypeople are familiar with already - after all, how could the design and construction of biological parts, systems and devices possibly not capture the wider imagination? Recent years have seen the creation of "synthetic life" - DNA that is digitally created before its printing and insertion into a living bacterium - and as a scientist in this field, you could be perfectly placed to direct and influence the next wave of developments.

Looking to change the world? Science jobs certainly allow you to do that, with those in the aforementioned fields offering some of the best possibilities of all. 

The 2013 IRP Awards will take place 3rd December at the London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square and will be hosted by the Newsnight presenter, Jeremy Vine.

 

 
 
Ricky Martin and Lord Alan Sugar are expanding their Science and Technology Recruitment Consultancy, Hyper Recruitment Solutions (HRS).
 
"Our vision is to provide recruitment solutions which will assist in the improvement and quality of life for all. We aim to provide a service to areas of actual need which have an impact on us all."
 
Here at HRS we recognise that each of the specialists skill sets that we support can be very intricate and can differ from one to another. This is why our highly professional and knowledgeable team of consultants have either come from industry or academia making us a collaboration of scientists supporting science. Therefore, naturally we welcome applications from recruiters who want to be a part of a company who are looking to raise the standard in professional recruitment within the Life Sciences industry.
 
With a vision to expand our team, we are currently looking for people with the drive and flair to create a new technical recruitment desk across the scientific arena at our Loughton office in Essex. This will be a desk which has the ability to grow and provide an opportunity for the successful candidate to potentially become the leader of that team. The successful candidates will have a strong focus on delivering high standards of recruitment excellence whilst working towards the core HRS visions and values
 
Recruitment professionals with the aspiration of developing something that they really are a part of is encouraged throughout HRS. So, if you are driven by generating new business, enthusiastic about developing long term relationships with a passion to succeed, then this is the role for you! In our opinion there is no better way to support science jobs / science careers than by having a recruitment consultant who is a scientist themselves. For that reason we encourage commercially driven scientists, ideally with experience in recruitment, to get in touch to see what opportunities we have for you.
 
To find out more about the role and how to apply, click here. We look forward to hearing from you!
 
 
 

 
As the largest membership organisation in Europe for the sector, One Nucleus has very strong engagement with the life science and healthcare sector nationally and internationally. As a member of One Nucleus, a leader in the Life Science and Healthcare communities, Hyper Recruitment Solutions (HRS) will be attending ON Helix, a new translational research conference for the life science industry and academia.
 
This one day event intends to inform delegates of how to turn early stages inventions and ideas into innovative health treatments that radically improve the quality of people’s lives around the world. It will combine keynote presentations from high profile global leaders, practical information, case studies and an excellent opportunity for networking. 
 
This event will present the UK landscape of the business environment, funding, scientific and clinical research excellence and will be a unique knowledge-sharing environment between academia and business. Recognising the importance of the topic for the UK life science industry, ON Helix will have the support of the ABPI, BIA and UK Trade & Investment (UKTI) for the conference.
 
“As a recruitment consultancy that specialises in scientific roles, events such as ON Helix, will provide HRS with an opportunity to share knowledge with the business and academic world, whilst supporting and promoting key topics in the UK life science industry. Moreover, this business network will help us to position scientific experts within this industry. - Ricky Martin, Managing Director of HRS.
 
HRS will be attending the ON Helix conference - which will take place on 9th July 2013, at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Cambridge.
 

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