Bioanalytical Science Jobs

Bioanalytical science is a sub-discipline of analytical chemistry, which is responsible for implementing technologies to help gather quantitative measurements from xenobiotics and biotics within biological systems.

In modern bioanalysis practices, many scientific endeavours are reliant upon precise quantitative measurements of endogenous substances and drugs within biological samples for the purpose of toxicokinetics, pharmacokinetics, exposure-response and bioequivalence. The practice of bioanalysis can also be applied to environmental issues, anti-doping testing in sports, unlawful drug use, and forensic investigations.

Many techniques exist that allow bioanalytical scientists to gather the information that they need from molecules. These include:

  • Hyphenated techniques such as CE-MS (capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry) and GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry)

  • Ligand binding assays such as radioimmunoassay and dual polarisation interferometry

  • Nuclear magnetic resonance

  • Electrophoresis

Career Requirements

There are certain steps that you will need to take in order to gather the knowledge and experience needed to become a bioanalytical scientist:

  • Bachelor's Degree - A bachelor's degree in a relevant field (such as chemistry or biology) will be extremely useful when you're looking to pursue a career in bioanalysis, as you will have undertaken modules that involve laboratory components, providing you essential laboratory research skills.

  • Postgraduate Degree - A postgraduate degree in chemistry or biology is extremely advantageous and looks good to potential employers, but is not always necessary. A master's degree will provide you with further analytical and research skills.

  • Work Experience - Many employers require at least 2 years of experience for bioanalytical jobs. Candidates with a master's degree may not need as much work experience as someone with just a bachelor's degree. Experience can often be gained through entry-level positions within research facilities.

Once you have accrued the necessary skills, knowledge and experience to pursue a full-time career in bioanalytical science, we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions can help you to find a suitable role. Bioanalytical recruitment is one of our specialities - we work with some of the best science firms in the country to help fill vital positions in a variety of different organisations.

Browse Our Bioanalytical Science Jobs >

Irritating Job

Hyper Recruitment Solutions recently conducted a survey to investigate what irritates employees in the workplace, and the results are truly staggering!


78% of employees have directly experienced rudeness in the workplace, including:

  • Being sworn at (54%)
  • Being reprimanded in front of peers (48%)
  • Being spoken over in a meeting (44%)
  • A personal remark about a choice of outfit (42%)

Our research further revealed that 92% of employees claim to have never been accused of workplace rudeness, despite 78% claiming that they’ve been on the receiving end.

Many of the respondents who stated that they had been accused of rudeness by colleagues cited swearing and speaking too directly as common reasons.


94% of employees said they thought that some physical contact in the workplace was acceptable.

However, responses varied depending on the type of contact:

  • A pat on the shoulder (52%)
  • A high-five (39%)
  • A hug (35%)
  • A fist bump (32%)
  • A kiss on the cheek (17%)

HRS Managing Director Ricky Martin says: “These results are pretty surprising. We often hear and read in the media how physical contact at work isn’t acceptable, yet our survey results suggest otherwise. Of course, physical contact isn’t always appropriate or well received, so I’d advise that it’s essential to be aware of factors such as personality, religion and culture. What might be regarded as friendly in one culture may be deemed deeply offensive in another! However, as the results suggest, should the relationship be there and requited, it shouldn’t be frowned upon for colleagues to hug, high-five or give one another a pat on the back!”


72% of employees would take action if working with a colleague with poor personal hygiene. What action would they take?

  • 36% of people would tell the person directly. Of these, men (78%) were more likely than women (68%) to voice their concerns about a colleague.

  • A further 36% would raise the issue with HR or management to handle the problem on their behalf.

This straight-talking approach is carried over into issues such as colleague disputes - over a third of employees surveyed would directly tell a colleague they don’t like them, with men (43%) being more likely to do so than women (24%).

Ricky says: “Workplace disputes and personality clashes are nothing new. What the results show is how direct people are when handling often-sensitive issues. I’d always advise that taking an open and honest approach with colleagues will work better in the long-term, but it’s important that colleagues are mindful not to unintentionally offend or create further issues in doing so.”


81% of employees cited small talk with colleagues as irritating.

Football and children were cited as the most irritating topics of conversation, as well as:

  • Trash-talking colleagues and clients (36%)
  • Forced pleasantries, such as 'How are you?' and 'Happy New Year!' (29%)
  • The weather (17%)

50% of employees admitted they had purposely not made a hot drink for themselves, just so they wouldn't have to make one for others!

This shows that while employees are willing to confront some issues head-on, they would sometimes rather avoid a situation completely than feel obliged to do something (like making a cup of tea for others in the workplace).


Why did we conduct this research?

HRS isn't just a company that puts people into jobs - we help candidates to find roles within organisations that make life-saving medicines and life-changing technologies. Ultimately, the people we support change lives!

With this in mind, we thought it essential to understand exactly why some people - even those in important, rewarding roles that look to be perfect for them - end up disengaging and leaving their employer. We hoped that this survey would uncover another side of the workplace, one that's not usually visible in CVs and job descriptions.

For more news and insights about the world of work, be sure to follow Hyper Recruitment Solutions on Facebook and Twitter!

HRS on Facebook >   @Hyperec_HRS on Twitter >

Application Specialist Jobs

Application specialists are employed by all sorts of different organisations in a wide variety of fields. This can be a very lucrative career for tech-savvy individuals who understand and enjoy working with software and computer systems.

Browse our application specialist jobs here >

What does an application specialist do?

Application specialists work with computer programs and software systems. They are frequently called upon to troubleshoot problems and help other people to use software applications. They may also be responsible for installing, altering and updating software systems.

Which industries employ application specialists?

Software is found in virtually all industry sectors nowadays, and the same applies to application specialists. Any organisation that relies on software to operate might also employ an application specialist to manage their software systems.

That said, the following industries are known to employ an especially large number of application specialists:

  • Biotechnology
  • Healthcare
  • Medical Devices
  • Financial Services

Requirements for application specialist jobs

Specific requirements vary from one job to the next, but application specialists are generally expected to know how to:

  • Use a wide variety of devices and applications
  • Identify and resolve IT-related problems
  • Maintain software systems, keeping them functional and up-to-date
  • Advise customers/colleagues and demonstrate how to use applications

The most important quality for an application specialist to have is a firm understanding of hardware and software. Problem-solving skills are important too, since the application specialist is the person everyone else turns to when a piece of software isn't working properly.

It's not all about working with computers, though. Application specialists are often required to demo new pieces of software and help other individuals to understand the systems they're using, so you can add good communication skills and a friendly demeanour to the list of highly-valued skills in this field.

Think you've got what it takes to succeed as an application specialist? At Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we work with a number of businesses who are looking to employ people like you – click here to view current vacancies!

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Scientific jobs in Scotland

Scientific jobs cover a broad spectrum of roles that require a range of very different skills. Whether you want to become an engineer or work in pharmaceuticals, the scientific industry is a very rewarding career path to take. Here at HRS, we know that jobs in this industry are highly sought-after, and we aim to help you find advantageous job opportunities that suit your skill set and experience. If you are currently based in Scotland, or looking for scientific jobs in Scotland because you are planning to relocate, Hyper Recruitment Solutions is able to help you.

Scotland has plenty of opportunities for talented job seekers, with countless scientific jobs available for competent scientific minds. We have a diverse range of Scottish job listings that we update on a regular basis, so please remember to check back if you can't currently find the type of job you are looking for.

To see some of our latest jobs in Scotland, simply click the links below. Then click 'View & Apply' to find out more about each job and what will be required of the successful candidate.

Scientific Job Opportunities in Scotland:

The scientific industry is a booming one, with new developments and new job opportunities arising every day. Scotland is constantly looking for new scientific talent and as a leading science recruitment company we take pride in matching those seeking science jobs with the most rewarding roles.

Once you have secured an interview with a prospective employer, we have plenty of ways to help you prepare for your appointment. We will help you every step of the way when you're trying to get a job in the science industry, so you know you have expert advice whatever stage of the process you're at.

If you have any questions about our recruitment services or any of the jobs we have listed on our website, we would be more than happy to help. Simply contact us today.

Pharmeceutical Industry

Working in the pharmaceutical industry allows you to change people’s lives for the better.

The pharmaceutical industry works to improve many people’s lives by researching, developing, making and marketing medicines. This industry is home to a varied range of incredibly rewarding jobs.

Here are a few reasons why you should consider working in the pharmaceutical industry.

The pharmaceutical industry is continuously growing

The pharmaceutical industry currently employs around 736,358 people in Europe and more than 854,000 in the United States, according to the IFPMA. It is thought that there are around 70,000 pharmaceutical jobs based in the UK alone.

This is a growing industry, and the number of jobs in the pharmaceutical industry is expected to continue rising. If you choose to work in pharmaceuticals, you will not have to worry about the industry becoming redundant.

Pharmaceutical companies employ people from different educational backgrounds

As the pharmaceutical industry is so large, it is able to take on and train up individuals with a variety of education levels. From training those with GCSEs as apprentices to funding research for those with PhDs or equivalent, the pharmaceutical industry offers something for everyone.

Employees who work for pharmaceutical companies very often receive training and gain experience with new processes and technologies. This in itself is another reason you should consider working in the pharmaceutical industry.

The pharmaceutical industry generally pays more than other industries

Every job within the pharmaceutical industry requires a high level of motivation and competence. It is a demanding industry in which hard work is handsomely rewarded, so your pay will be more than enough to put a smile on your face.

According to recent market analysis, the average pharmaceutical job pays £37,500 a year. This varies substantially across the different jobs within the field. For example, the Marketing and Advertising Sector pays around £62,500 on average, whereas a secretary will still get a good salary of around £25,000.

It is an industry which never stands still

If you’re thinking about changing jobs because your current role has become monotonous, the pharmaceutical industry will change everything for you. There are very few boring jobs in pharmaceuticals, and the industry is always looking for dynamic new recruits who want to achieve great things.

If you choose a career in pharmaceuticals, you will constantly be a part of new breakthroughs and developments in the industry.

The pharmaceutical industry covers a huge range of jobs and roles, so you will have your pick of working environments. With constant room for career development and individual growth, there’s never a dull day in the pharmaceutical industry.

Have we persuaded you that you should work in pharmaceuticals? If so, click here to browse the latest pharmaceutical vacancies from Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

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