Scientific jobs in Scotland

Scientific jobs cover a broad spectrum of roles that require a range of very different skills. Whether you want to become an engineer or work in pharmaceuticals, the scientific industry is a very rewarding career path to take. Here at HRS, we know that jobs in this industry are highly sought-after, and we aim to help you find advantageous job opportunities that suit your skill set and experience. If you are currently based in Scotland, or looking for scientific jobs in Scotland because you are planning to relocate, Hyper Recruitment Solutions is able to help you.

Scotland has plenty of opportunities for talented job seekers, with countless scientific jobs available for competent scientific minds. We have a diverse range of Scottish job listings that we update on a regular basis, so please remember to check back if you can't currently find the type of job you are looking for.

To see some of our latest jobs in Scotland, simply click the links below. Then click 'View & Apply' to find out more about each job and what will be required of the successful candidate.

Scientific Job Opportunities in Scotland:

The scientific industry is a booming one, with new developments and new job opportunities arising every day. Scotland is constantly looking for new scientific talent and as a leading science recruitment company we take pride in matching those seeking science jobs with the most rewarding roles.

Once you have secured an interview with a prospective employer, we have plenty of ways to help you prepare for your appointment. We will help you every step of the way when you're trying to get a job in the science industry, so you know you have expert advice whatever stage of the process you're at.

If you have any questions about our recruitment services or any of the jobs we have listed on our website, we would be more than happy to help. Simply contact us today.

Pharmeceutical Industry

Working in the pharmaceutical industry allows you to change people’s lives for the better.

The pharmaceutical industry works to improve many people’s lives by researching, developing, making and marketing medicines. This industry is home to a varied range of incredibly rewarding jobs.

Here are a few reasons why you should consider working in the pharmaceutical industry.

The pharmaceutical industry is continuously growing

The pharmaceutical industry currently employs around 736,358 people in Europe and more than 854,000 in the United States, according to the IFPMA. It is thought that there are around 70,000 pharmaceutical jobs based in the UK alone.

This is a growing industry, and the number of jobs in the pharmaceutical industry is expected to continue rising. If you choose to work in pharmaceuticals, you will not have to worry about the industry becoming redundant.

Pharmaceutical companies employ people from different educational backgrounds

As the pharmaceutical industry is so large, it is able to take on and train up individuals with a variety of education levels. From training those with GCSEs as apprentices to funding research for those with PhDs or equivalent, the pharmaceutical industry offers something for everyone.

Employees who work for pharmaceutical companies very often receive training and gain experience with new processes and technologies. This in itself is another reason you should consider working in the pharmaceutical industry.

The pharmaceutical industry generally pays more than other industries

Every job within the pharmaceutical industry requires a high level of motivation and competence. It is a demanding industry in which hard work is handsomely rewarded, so your pay will be more than enough to put a smile on your face.

According to recent market analysis, the average pharmaceutical job pays £37,500 a year. This varies substantially across the different jobs within the field. For example, the Marketing and Advertising Sector pays around £62,500 on average, whereas a secretary will still get a good salary of around £25,000.

It is an industry which never stands still

If you’re thinking about changing jobs because your current role has become monotonous, the pharmaceutical industry will change everything for you. There are very few boring jobs in pharmaceuticals, and the industry is always looking for dynamic new recruits who want to achieve great things.

If you choose a career in pharmaceuticals, you will constantly be a part of new breakthroughs and developments in the industry.

The pharmaceutical industry covers a huge range of jobs and roles, so you will have your pick of working environments. With constant room for career development and individual growth, there’s never a dull day in the pharmaceutical industry.

Have we persuaded you that you should work in pharmaceuticals? If so, click here to browse the latest pharmaceutical vacancies from Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

What to Wear to a Job Interview

Job interviews are all about making a good first impression, and nothing makes or breaks a first impression like how you're dressed. When a potential employer invites you to an interview, you should immediately start thinking about what to wear - what is the right outfit for this interview?

To some extent, of course, the answer to that question will depend on what sort of job you're interviewing for, but it's always important to look neat and professional. Even if you're hoping to land a role at a trendy tech start-up where all the employees wear T-shirts and jeans, it pays to look smart for the interview.

With that in mind, here - courtesy of the team here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions - are some top tips to help you get dressed for that career-making job interview:

  • First of all, be prepared. Don't wait until the day of the interview to select your outfit (especially if you're indecisive - showing up late won't look good regardless of what you're wearing!). Pick your clothes a few days in advance, and get them out of wardrobe to check that they're clean and crease-free. Leave yourself plenty of time to do laundry and ironing, just in case.

  • Don't dress too outrageously. Novelty ties, plunging necklines, garishly bright colours...a good interview outfit avoids all of these things. You want the interviewer to remember you for your articulate and intelligent answers, not for your red polka-dot shirt or your skimpy dress.

  • Be moderate with make-up, jewellery and scents. A drop of cologne or a touch of make-up? No problem. But you're not going on a date or hitting the clubs - you're applying for a job, so there's no need to do yourself up too extravagantly.

  • You're not there to show off your fashion sense. By all means wear nice, modern-looking clothes - you don't want to look like you've stepped through a portal from the 1970s. But unless you're interviewing for a post at some glossy magazine, your clothes shouldn't be trying to persuade the interviewer of your smashing fashion sense. Make a good impression by looking tidy and together, not by dressing for the catwalk.

  • Check your hair. Like clothing, hair can have a very powerful impact on what people think when they meet you for the first time. Your hairdo should be as neat and tidy as your outfit, so spend a little time sorting it out before you set off for the interview (and don't be afraid to go for a trim if you need it).

  • It's better to be overdressed than underdressed. It's an enormously clichéd piece of advice to offer, but 'dress for the job you want, not the job you have' is a good saying to bear in mind when pondering what to wear to a job interview. Most employers will expect interviewees to look reasonably smart even if they allow their employees to dress casually, and if in doubt, it's always safer to dress formally. In the vast majority of cases, business attire will make a far better impression than the clothes you wear around the house.

If you need more interview preparation tips, be sure to visit our Interview Advice page!

Still looking for your dream job? Browse the latest science and technology vacancies here.

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Project management

The science and technology industry is made up of a huge number of workers in a huge number of different roles. The skillset required to work in one scientific sector (biotechnology, for instance) may bear no resemblance whatsoever to the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in another sector (like medical affairs). Science is a massively diverse field that relies on all kinds of different people and their unique abilities.

That being said, there are some roles that can be found across almost all scientific sectors, one obvious example being the role of the project manager.


Project Manager - Role & Responsibilites

A project manager is responsible for planning projects and ensuring that each one is executed to a high standard on time and on budget. Project managers can be found in a wide array of different industries, including IT, telecoms, pharmaceuticals, construction, transport, and countless others.

The precise nature of a project manager's duties will depend on what sector they're in, but common responsibilities include:

  • Communicating with clients, acting as their primary point of contact for the duration of the project
  • Delegating tasks to the appropriate member(s) of staff
  • Overseeing project progress and ensuring high-quality outcomes
  • Making plans and ensuring that everyone follows them
  • Procuring whatever resources are necessary to the project's success

Generally speaking, it is not the project manager's job to actually carry out the work involved in any given project - rather, they will divide up the work between different parts of their workforce and ensure that the project progresses as planned from start to finish. However, a project manager will usually be expected to have a strong understanding of the work they are overseeing.

Click here to browse the latest project manager jobs from Hyper Recruitment Solutions.


Why Are Project Managers Important?

The project manager's role is a critical one because they keep everything running smoothly throughout each project. While talented workers are of course crucial to the success of any organisation, a talented project manager can be just as valuable because they will ensure that all workers are operating in harmony while sticking to the overarching plan. Without a capable project manager at the helm, projects can lapse into chaos and end up missing their deadlines and exceeding their budgets.


Project Manager - Job Requirements

While different fields require different things of their project managers, every good project manager should:

  • Have good communication skills
  • Work well under pressure
  • Know how to co-ordinate and motivate members of a team
  • Be able to work to a strict schedule
  • Have strong organisational skills

Looking for a job in project management? Browse project manager vacancies >

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Graduating from university is a great feeling, but tossing your mortarboard in the air is also the precursor to one of the biggest and scariest steps you'll ever have to take: the step away from student life and into the world of work.

Searching for your first full-time job can be a gruelling and demoralising task. If you've just left university, you probably don't have a whole lot of relevant work experience just yet, and as a result you may feel that you're at a significant disadvantage as you struggle to get a foot on that all-important first rung of the career ladder. But rest assured that there are many employers out there who are desperate to recruit talented graduates like yourself - you just have to make sure they know about you!

With that in mind, here - courtesy of science job specialists Hyper Recruitment Solutions - are 5 top tips for graduates who are looking for jobs:

1) Before you apply for anything, Google yourself.

No matter what sort of role you're looking to land, you can bet that the person who receives your job application will pop your name into a search engine before deciding whether or not to offer you an interview. This is the 21st century, and these days, potential employers will often scrutinise your online presence just as much as your CV. So make sure you're not showing them anything you don't want them to see!

Before you begin your job search, you should:

  • Type your name into Google to see what comes up on the first page of results. (If you have a common name, or if you share your name with somebody famous, you may want to try including your location in the search - e.g. 'daniel radcliffe sunderland' - to find pages that are specifically about you.) Is there anything in there that might damage a potential employer's opinion of you? A Twitter account, a news story, something you wrote years ago that you're not particularly proud of? It may not be possible to erase every piece of information about yourself, but if you're able to eliminate any red flags then you absolutely should.

  • You should also use Facebook's 'View As...' feature to find out how much of your profile is visible to the public. If necessary, adjust your privacy settings so that only your friends can view the things you post. You don't want your future boss to see those drunk photos of you from your graduation party, do you?

2) Make your CV shine.

Composing an impressive CV can be tough when you're fresh out of uni, especially if you haven't previously held a role that's similar to the one you're applying for. But don't assume that the experience you do have is worthless - just because you've never worked in an office before doesn't mean that you've never exercised the skills needed to succeed in that environment.

The key is to think outside the box a little bit. Let's say you're applying for a marketing job at an FMCG company - sure, you've never occupied a marketing post before, but you completed a degree, and perhaps you even worked a part-time job or two while you were studying. These and other experiences will have equipped you with:

  • The ability to work as part of a team
  • The ability to approach tasks creatively
  • Strong communication skills
  • The ability to meet deadlines and work under pressure
  • An understanding of how to behave when dealing with customers/clients
All of these things are highly valued by employers in all sorts of different sectors, so don't be reluctant to include them on your curriculum vitae. Don't think in terms of experience - think in terms of skills!

3) Cast your net wide.

Different employers advertise their vacancies in all sorts of different places, so don't limit yourself to a single website or job listings board. By all means sign up with big names like Monster and Indeed, but bear in mind that there are lots of specialist recruiters out there too - recruiters like Aspire for the digital / media sector and HRS for science jobs. Some organisations, having a limited budget for this sort of thing, will exclusively recruit via these more specialised portals, so don't kid yourself that you'll see every available vacancy just because you check Reed every day.

4) Don't go back into higher education without a good reason.

Postgraduate courses are great, and in some cases, you'll need a master's or a PhD to get the career you really want. However, far too many graduates sleepwalk into postgraduate programmes simply because they don't feel ready to compete for full-time employment.

That's usually a bad decision. Higher education is expensive, as you're no doubt already aware, and while you might tell yourself that a more advanced qualification will lead to better career prospects, the evidence on that front is somewhat ambiguous.

Yes, entering the world of work can feel like jumping into an abyss, but you shouldn't go back to university just because you're cosily familiar with academic life and scared of sampling the alternative. If you have a clear goal in mind (e.g. 'I need additional qualification X in order to be considered for job Y') then by all means go for it, but otherwise, you're probably better off taking the leap into full-time employment.

5) Remember - you're not committing to a career for life. 

When searching for jobs to apply for, try to bear in mind that your first post-university job doesn't necessarily have to lead to the career of your dreams. Many people don't even decide on a career until quite a bit later in life, so don't feel pressured to apply exclusively for jobs that are directly linked to whatever you think you'd like to be doing in ten or twenty years' time. You might only stay in this first job for a year or two - and that's okay, because it will still give you a lot of extra experience and a lot of new things to add to that CV of yours.

So those are our top 5 tips for gradaute jobseekers, and we hope they'll come in handy! Of course, there's no secret formula or trick for landing any job you apply for, but it's important to stay positive and keep striving for success even if you suffer a setback or two. Just because your first few applications didn't lead anywhere doesn't mean that you should give up - keep going, and you'll be starting your new job before you know it!

Searching for jobs in the science/technology sector? Click here to create a candidate account and browse the latest vacancies from Hyper Recruitment Solutions!

Have you considered a career in recruitment?

Here at HRS, we are looking for talented individuals who want to make a difference to the science and technology sectors through recruitment. We have a number of positions available for trainee Recruitment Consultants / Graduate Sales Executives to join our growing sales teams.

The recruitment industry is one of the most rewarding and desirable sectors to work in. If you have an outgoing personality, are good with people, and happy to work hard to succeed in life, then you are perfect for a job in recruitment. We will train you to the highest possible standards and develop your skills and knowledge of the recruitment industry. If you have a passion and enthusiasm for doing the job right, this position offers great rewards.

Apply now >

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