Manufacturing jobs

The onward march of technology has long been a double-edged sword in terms of its effect on employment.

On the one hand, technological advancement has created entirely new industries and led to increased efficiency, rapid production, and streamlining of the workplace in general.

On the other hand, automation has made a lot of formerly essential jobs obsolete, and those job losses will only become more widespread as the fields of AI and robotics continue to break new ground.

It's easy to see why so many people are looking for new lines of work that simply could not exist without human workers. So which jobs are safe from automation? And which are most at risk?

Jobs most at risk from automation

A 2017 report by consultancy firm McKinsey Global Institute projected that up to 800 million workers across the globe will lose their jobs to robots by 2030, noting that machine operators and food workers are likely to take the brunt of the hit.

While that may be a shocking statistic, technology reshaping the workplace is nothing new. In fact, it’s been a vital part of our evolution as a species - as time goes by, old jobs become redundant and new jobs become available that would have been inconceivable a few decades prior. The matchstick makers and lamplighters of yore couldn't possibly have imagined that their descendants would be designing websites, testing video games, and developing machine-learning algorithms for search engines.

Over the last half-century, however, jobs have been erased by technological advancement at an alarmingly fast pace. From switchboard operators to railway ticket sellers and the litany of factory jobs in between, it seems that no line of work is completely without risk of automation - even McDonald’s is creeping closer to fully-automated ordering with the growing influx of self-service machines.

But let’s not throw in the towel just yet. There are still plenty of vocations left that require a human touch!

What jobs are safe from automation?

According to BusinessInsider.com, the top 10 jobs least likely to become automated are almost exclusively health and social care role, with occupational therapists topping the list. Social workers are not far behind, closely followed by dentists, physicians, surgeons and nutritionists.

Outside of healthcare, creative jobs like choreography and exhibit designers also rank highly on the list. Creeping into the wider top 20, counselling and psychology roles rank well, as does teaching, while medical health and medical science are also fairly safe from the creeping threat of automation.

Industries likeliest to remain safe from automation

An Oxford University study titled The Future of Employment provides a great deal of insight into what human employment will look like in the future and, more importantly, the areas where human brains are most crucial.

Overall, healthcare and social sciences are the industries least likely to be automated in the foreseeable future. The human aspects of therapy and social care make these sectors relatively inaccessible for artificial intelligences. Boasting seven of the top ten jobs in the list, it seems that a career in healthcare is a fairly safe bet that shouldn’t see too much change in the foreseeable future.

Similarly, the emotional connection that's needed in the education sector also seems likely to ensure a steady future for teachers. Art & Design, Sport & Entertainment and Media are three other avenues that require individualistic input that is hard to replace with technology.

Skills needed for the jobs of the future

So what skills are most likely to secure steady employment in the future? Many industry experts point to three notable attributes:

  • Creativity - The expressive nature of creative jobs is not something that can be digitally automated, making proficiency in this a true asset that’s virtually future-proof.

  • Emotional intelligence - Empathy and emotional understanding are human characteristics that are notably absent in machines, safeguarding roles where human interaction is paramount. This is a big part of why healthcare professionals and social workers are unlikely to be replace by robots any time soon.

  • STEM proficiency - STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. These complex fields are relatively safe from automation, so a science or engineering degree should stand you in good stead for the future.

Looking for a career in the science or technology industries? Click the link below to browse vacancies from all over the UK!

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'Introvert' was once viewed as something of a dirty word within the recruitment industry and the wider world of work. Introverts (or so went the stereotype) were reclusive, uncooperative, and difficult to work with - not what any employer is looking for in a new recruit.

Luckily, the world has come a long way in recent years, and many character traits that were once wrongly deemed as negatives are now welcomed with open arms - an introverted personality being one of them.

Truth be told, being introverted actually has numerous benefits in the workplace, and an introverted individual can bring with them a number of attributes that are highly sought after by employers in a variety of different sectors.

Jobs for introverts

The benefits of being introverted

Being an introverted person can have a number of hidden advantages. Introverts typically possess excellent creative skills and imaginative ideas, making them a great fit for jobs that require originality, artistic flair, or outside-the-box problem solving.

Meanwhile, introverts are often extremely focused, highly productive workers who are undeterred by the hustle and bustle happening around them. What’s more, introverts tend to choose their words carefully, meaning that - while they may not speak up often - there’s weight to their words when they do.

The innate ability to work independently also promotes impressive organisational skills, which goes hand-in-hand with excellent prioritisation of work. In addition to that, these independent qualities also promote initiative, self-management and responsibility, without the need to over-rely on others.

That being said, it isn’t all plain sailing and there are undoubtedly a few hurdles for any introvert to overcome if they want to succeed in the working world.

Obstacles for the introverted

Unfortunately for introverts, the world of work does also tend to involve a number of situations that are not ideally suited to this type of personality. From the initial interview process to the working environment itself, the necessity for interaction, collaboration and general conversation is quite a departure from the preferred environment of your average introvert.

Open-plan office layouts and team-based activities are just two of the necessary evils that must commonly be confronted. On top of that, team meetings, occasional office socials and even communal dining areas can be uncomfortable settings for introverted people.

But don’t despair just yet, introverts of the world – it’s not all doom and gloom.

Introvert working

Jobs for introverted people

Luckily, there are numerous jobs that lend themselves well to introverted personalities. These range from IT-based roles to more physical jobs and everything in between.

Here are just a few examples from a variety of different sectors:

Graphic Designer

Top of the list of jobs that are ideal for creative introverts is that of the graphic designer. With the majority of the work being carried out solo, the vast majority of your working day will be spent working alone, left to your own devices.

While you may have to run through a brief with a client, manager or team, the design task is ultimately left in your hands. Better still, this also draws on the creativity and imagination commonly associated with introverted personalities, making this job the dream ticket for many introverts.

Best of all, this job can often be done on a freelance basis, allowing you to potentially bypass the office environment altogether and work in the comfort (and seclusion) of your own home.

Accountant

If you have a good head for figures, a job in accountancy could be extremely rewarding – both with regards to job satisfaction and financial reimbursement.

Attention to detail and a focused approach are two vital requirements for this profession; ditto the ability to prioritise and work to deadlines. For introverts that tick those boxes and command a solid knowledge of mathematics, this can be a fantastic career path to follow.

As an accountant, your main priority will be to analyse economic data, crunch numbers, and produce financial reports for clients and businesses, ultimately ensuring that they’re operating efficiently, legally and on-budget. Accountancy jobs offer a wealth of opportunities to progress, and there’s often the flexibility to work remotely as well.

Lab Technician

If you have a keen interest in healthcare but are put off by the idea of dealing with patients and the general public, a great way into the industry is via the laboratory door. If you get a job as a lab technician, you can expect to carry out routine technical tasks, sample testing and experiments, along with data analysis and risk assessment.

Depending on the field you're in, the role itself may be clinic-based or focused around research and development. You may find yourself working independently or under the direction of a more experienced professional - either way, expect a high degree of independence. A keen eye for detail and the ability to work well unsupervised are great assets to have as a lab tech, two attributes that many introverts have in droves.

Web Developer

For the computer-savvy introvert, web development can be a lucrative and logical direction to go in. As a web developer, you will primarily be tasked with designing, coding and modifying websites to meet your client's wishes.

While this is a position that can be done outside of an office environment, there are lots of in-house web developer roles as well; as such, you may be based within a team of other specialists. Nevertheless, it’s not unusual for a web developer to find themselves honed in on a job or project for hours at a time, meticulously programming away with no time to stop and chat.

As with many IT jobs, this can require a lot of independent working, left to your own devices to focus on getting the visual appearance and technical performance is up to scratch. If you see yourself as a focused, analytical introvert with sound IT knowledge, a career in web development could be a match made in heaven.

Writer

The job of a writer is an ideal one for introverts who are well-versed in the written word and have a creative flair for language. Best of all, writing jobs can come in many different guises, from the formal, straight-laced style of a technical writer to the more conversational, down-to-earth approach of a full-time blogger.

Meanwhile, writing also has the potential for good career progression as a self-employed solo venture or within a wider team, with editorial positions a logical next step. What’s more, the role of a writer also lends itself perfectly to freelance work and can be done just as easily - if not more so - when working remotely.

So, there you have it – proof that introversion doesn’t mean you have to be cut off from the outside world, banished to a secluded dungeon and forced to work alone by candlelight!

Here are some other useful links for introverts, particularly those who are seeking a career in the science or technology industries:

Interview Tips for Introverts >   Browse Science Jobs >

Handing in your notice

If you’re in the process of looking for a new job, you may not have considered how you will go about handing in your notice to your current employer. But searching for a new job while working is a big hurdle to get over first!

However, handing in your notice at the correct time and in the right way is incredibly important to your long-term career goals. The thought of having to tell your employer that you’re leaving them may make you uncomfortable, but keep in mind that companies are accustomed to this - it's all part of running a business.

Good references from past employers are paramount to your career progression, so here’s a brief guide to when you should hand in your notice and how to resign professionally.

The best time to hand in your notice

It is vital that you do not hand in your notice until you have received a formal job offer in writing. If something falls through with your potential new job before the written offer and you have already handed in your notice, you may be left jobless. Even if you think your new job is near enough secured, background checks or even company changes could affect your verbal offer.

If you have not yet received a formal job offer from the company and seem to be waiting a while, ask them politely if they know what date you may be starting and if they know when you will receive the formal job offer.

The best time to hand in your notice is when you have your formal offer in writing and when you know your manager will be available to talk.

It is best to hand your notice to your manager in person if this is possible. They will appreciate it much more than an email or a letter left on their desk. It will also give you a chance to express your gratitude to the company and ensure that it is an amicable parting of ways.

Prepare for all outcomes

Handing in your notice may come as a shock to your employer, so be prepared for their reaction. They may be upset as they now need to start looking for your replacement, which could be a costly undertaking. If this does happen, it is important to maintain composure and be professional throughout.

You do not have to go into your reasons for leaving, but if you would prefer to let them know why, try to not get too personal. Try to be as neutral in the conversation as possible and do not direct anger towards your manager. Upsetting your manager further is not a good way to gain a good reference.

You should also be prepared for a counter-offer. If your manager can’t bear the thought of you leaving the company, they may offer you more money or a promotion. To be prepared for this outcome after handing in your notice, make sure you measure up the pros and cons of both businesses prior to your meeting.

Furthermore, you should be prepared for your manager to ask you to leave with immediate effect. In some jobs, this may actually be an easier transition than you working out your notice period. If you are dismissed, you can ask why but try not to get into an argument. You will still be paid for the notice period time.

Stay professional at all times

In case we haven't already made this clear, it is very important stay professional when you hand in your notice and during your notice period. Even if you absolutely hate the job you’re in, now is not a good time to express your contempt. You’re already leaving the company, there’s no need to make it more awkward for your employer.

Here are a few things to keep in mind.

  • Your notice should be worded professionally and should not go into specifics
  • Be sure to work out your notice period and offer to tie up any loose ends
  • Prepare yourself to train someone else to fill your role
  • If you want to tell your colleagues, be respectful
  • Continue working as usual up until your leaving date - don’t slack off

If you follow these steps, your resignation should go smoothly and you should be well on your way towards your new job with a good reference in hand.

If you are currently looking for work, take a look at our latest jobs here. Hyper Recruitment Solutions are a leading recruitment agency specialising in science and technology and we’re here to help.

 

work life balance

Jobs in science can be highly demanding, involving long hours, a stressful workload and mentally-taxing tasks.

While the role itself may be tricky, perhaps the most difficult thing to master is how to juggle work and home life.

Knowing how to balance work and life at home is difficult for anyone, but the added pressure associated with science jobs can put even more strain on the employee.

Here are a few of our favourite tips on how to remain professionally productive without completely burning yourself out along the way.

 

What is a healthy work-life balance?

The phrase “healthy work-life balance” is commonly bandied about in employment circles, but what does it actually mean?

While the exact definition may vary one person to the next, a work-life balance is essentially the ability to create a synergistic relationship between your everyday home life and your day-to-day profession.

The expression “work to live not live to work” sums this up perfectly. A demanding profession can quickly take over your personal life, if you let it.

Maintaining a healthy work-life balance can be vital for mental health, not to mention a key component in preserving relationships outside of the office.

 

How to balance work and life

For the career-driven, it can be all too easy to get buried in work at the expense of your home life. As such, knowing how to balance work and life outside of it is an important skill to have.

Luckily, we have a few choice tips on how to do just that.

 

Aim for the right balance for you

Naturally, working hours can vary greatly from one job to the next and jobs are no different. Meanwhile, different people will also have different tolerance thresholds. 

Some of us can work well into the evenings on consecutive days showing little signs of ill-effect, while others may need more regular time out to keep themselves operational.

Above all, you should consider how your current work-life balance feels to you and whether changes should be made in either direction. If demands of work are bleeding over into the home (or vice versa), it may be time to reassess.

 

Don't get hooked on stress

Stressful situations can cause the body to release a cocktail of stress hormones, including adrenaline. The subsequent adrenaline rush can be an invigorating feeling, leaving you energised and ready to take on the world.

Deadlines, demanding workloads and decreasing time constraints are common stresses in the professional environment which, as such, can also provide a similar adrenaline-fuelled sensation.

However, as effective as adrenaline may be on productivity, you shouldn’t rely on it to fuel you from one day to the next – that’s a sure-fire way to burn out in a hurry.

It's important to learn how to balance work and life in a healthy way – riding a daily adrenaline high to each deadline isn’t the way to do it. Ensure productive preservation by taking time to cool down and mentally reset.

 

Allow others to lighten the load

A common trait in the workplace – particularly for those who take extreme pride in their work – is the inability to delegate tasks. Science as a whole is a repeat offender.

Across the full range of fields and functions – from pharmacology and immunology to R&D and quality assurance – science is rife with people who are reluctant to give up responsibilities, despite knowing that they are overworked.

If this sounds like you, don't allow pride to keep you under pressure. If your workload is overflowing, ask your colleagues to take over some of your duties. Remember, many hands make light work.

 

Distinguish clearly between home and the workplace

Do you take your work home with you? If so, it could be a glaring warning beacon that your work-life balance is in danger of capsizing.

While it can be unavoidable at times – and virtually impossible if you work remotely – regularly working at home can be a slippery slope to reside on. It can be all too easy to slip into a pattern of clocking off only to fire up the laptop and clock back in when you arrive home.

Over time, those working hours can creep up far beyond where they should be, inadvertently taking priority over relaxing and recharging. Worse still, it can just as easily begin to replace time spent with loved ones as well.

Differentiating between work and play can be the ultimate component in keeping work and home lives separate.

If you do need to work at home – whether it’s a permanent arrangement or merely a one-off – try to keep your work time confined to designated space, such as an office room.

This will help you to recognise how much time is spent dedicated to work, while also preventing your home from becoming an extension of your working environment.

 

Make the most of the weekend

Any sportsman will tell you that downtime is just as important as hard work when it comes to achieving and maintaining peak performance. The same applies when it comes to working life.

Even if you can only spare one or two weekends a month for guilt-free relaxation, make sure you do it. Whether you spend it chilling out with friends, crashed out in front of the TV or in a new city on a well-deserved break, be sure to leave work in the rear-view mirror.

 

 

Looking for a new role that better fits your idea of a healthy work-life balance? Click the button below and let Hyper Recruitment Solutions take the stress out of your job search today.

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