Finding a Job Overseas

Are you thinking about working abroad? There are lots of reasons to move to another country, but regardless of why you're relocating, you'll probably need to find a job when you get there.

Here are some important things to consider when you're trying to find a job overseas:

Where do you want to go?

If you know which country you'd like to work in, you should begin your job hunt by gauging what sort of jobs are available in that territory. Lots of recruitment agencies (including Hyper Recruitment Solutions) feature both local and international job listings, so these companies' websites can be a good place to start.

Do you need a visa?

It's important to know whether you are eligible to work in your chosen country. Generally speaking, UK citizens will need a visa to work in non-EU countries, but you shouldn't need one to work within other EU member states (note that this may change depending on how Brexit negotiations progress).

You will need to have a rough idea of how long you intend to stay in your chosen country, as this may affect the type and volume of paperwork you have to complete.

Localise your CV

Once you've got an idea of the work that's available and the documentation you'll need to work in your chosen country, you can begin to investigate the local employment protocol. This might require you to adjust your CV - in some places you will be expected to include a picture, while others may require you to disclose your age, etc.

Other challenges you might face:

  • Language Barrier - Be prepared to stumble through some awkward conversations if you're not fluent in your new home's primary language.

  • Homesickness - It's normal to miss home after relocating, but don't worry. You'll meet lots of new and interesting friends before you know it!

Working abroad can be an invaluable asset to your career - it builds confidence, and you'll experience things that you never would have encountered at home. Browse HRS job listings and apply online >

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Finding a job while pregnant

Trying to find a job while you're expecting a baby can make what is already a fairly stressful time very trying indeed. However, there's no reason why you can't secure a new role during this exciting period of your life - here's some expert advice that we hope will make the job-hunting process as easy possible:

Do I have to disclose that I'm pregnant?

Potential employers are not allowed to ask whether you're planning to have a baby when deciding whether or not to hire you (and if you choose to inform them of your pregnancy, this cannot affect their final decision). According to UK law, you must be given the same consideration as a candidate who is not pregnant.

What should I look for in a new job?

You need to carefully consider how your situation is going to change over the course of your pregnancy and beyond. Important logistical questions include:

  • How flexible are the hours?
  • How will you get to work, and how long will the journey take?
  • Will you need childcare after the baby arrives, and will it be available near your place of work?
If at all possible, you don't want your new job to add too much extra stress to your life at this busy time.

Will I be entitled to parental leave?

Yes - if you are giving birth, you are legally entitled to 26 weeks of statutory leave, regardless of how long you've been in your job or how much you get paid. Whether your employer offers any further maternity leave after this will depend on the company's own policies.

Browse Job Listings from HRS >

Recent reports suggest that almost half (42%) of workers in the UK are "staying in roles they are unhappy in because self-doubt stops them from applying for their dream job" (London Evening Standard).

If you're thinking about changing jobs, then keep reading - we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions have put together this helpful guide to help you decide whether it's the right time to move. We'll highlight some of the things you'll want to think about before changing jobs, and offer some tips to help you with your search for a new role.

Should I Change Jobs?

If any of the following apply to you, it might be time to think about changing jobs:

  • You are bored at work. If you find yourself constantly watching the clock while at work, it might be time to ask your supervisor for more responsibility or a more varied set of tasks to take on. If your current role is unable to challenge you, it might be time to go elsewhere. Boredom is a sign that you're not working to your full potential.

  • The company's culture has changed. Sometimes, a change in your working environment can make you feel uncomfortable. Perhaps you have a new supervisor who takes a different approach to management, or perhaps there are ethical issues within the company that have only recently surfaced. Whatever the problem is, if the culture of your workplace doesn't suit you, it can be very difficult to feel motivated or happy at work and this can be reason enough to leave.

  • Your career path looks limited. Can you see yourself progressing in the company? If the answer is no, it might be time to seek out a new challenge. Staying in a dead-end job can, of course, be a comfortable option, but it's not especially rewarding. Most people can expect to progress in both position and pay the longer they with a particular employer. If that doesn't appear to be the case in your current occupation, it's probably time to look elsewhere.

  • You are constantly tired and/or stressed. Stress and fatigue can eventually cause you serious damage both physically and mentally. It's important to feel like you can achieve what is expected of you during the working day without undue stress or physical exertion. If you are struggling to cope with the demands of your current role, it might be worth reducing your hours or looking for a less demanding position.

  • You're good at your job, but you don't like it. You might be successful, but are you happy? Job satisfaction is just as important as job success - maybe you've spent a long time working to achieve your current position, but is it really worth staying if you despise coming in for work each day? Work takes up a huge portion of our adult lives, so if you feel unhappy with what you are currently doing, it might be worth taking a risk and trying something else that you really enjoy. It's never too late to make a change!

Before giving your notice, consider the following:

  • Lots of short-term roles look bad on a CV. Employers might not take you seriously if your CV has a string of short-term employments on it, especially if you're now applying for a more senior role with lots of responsibilities. Consider looking for ways to improve your current situation rather than jumping ship within a few months of arriving.

  • It's important to consider how other jobs compare to your current role. If you're thinking about changing jobs, you may well be struggling to see the positives of your present situation. However, there is always a possibility that your new job will be worse than your current job - spend some time writing a list of pros and cons before handing in your notice, and this will help you to evaluate whether you really dislike your job as much as you think you do.

  • Don't leave because of one bad day. If you're having a hard time at work right now, quitting ASAP may seem like the only way out. But if you leave because of one bad day or an unusually stressful week, you may find yourself regretting it in the future. Things can change rapidly, so try to view leaving as a last resort if possible.

Tips for finding a great new job:

  • Look for roles that spark your interest and offer a challenge. You'll want to avoid moving into a position that is every bit as boring and unchallenging as your current role. During job interviews, ask about opportunities for training and progression within the company - not only will this help you to choose a job with real possibilities, it will also show the interviewer that you are ambitious, highly motivated, and prepared to really push yourself.

  • Don't be scared to take a risk - it might pay off! As we mentioned at the top of this article, many people stay in jobs they hate because of simple self-doubt. Making such a drastic change to your life can be extremely daunting, but it can also be endlessly rewarding. Don't let yourself be paralysed by fear!

  • Stay positive! If you start looking for a new job with a negative attitude, you are far less likely to succeed in your search. Deciding to start a new chapter of your life should be an exciting experience, and starting with a positive outlook should make the whole process much easier.
If you're ready to look for a new job, take a look at Hyper Recruitment Solutions' science job listings - we have hundreds of vacancies in the science and technology sectors, and we can help to ensure that your transition into your new job is enjoyable and stress-free.

New Year Fireworks

An article recently published on Buzzfeed offered a number of suggestions for job seekers who are hoping to land their 'dream role' in the new year. The tips were fairly wide-ranging, touching on everything from cleaning up your social media accounts to choosing the right interview clothes.

Even so, we believe that we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions can add a few extra tips to the list - if you're serious about getting a new job in 2018, here are 5 more things that you should keep in mind:

1. Ask somebody else to read your CV.

Before you send your CV to any potential employers, give it to a trusted friend or family member and ask them to give it a quick read-through. Your proof-reader will hopefully catch any spelling / grammar mistakes that you failed to spot yourself, but more importantly, they'll be able to tell you whether or not the document is a fair representation of your abilities and experiences. It may just be that you're selling yourself short!

2. Tailor your CV to each job you apply for.

Once you've finished writing your CV, it's easy to just send exactly the same version to every prospective employer. But tweaking your CV each time you send it - tailoring it to the specific role you're applying for - can be a very worthwhile endeavour. You don't have to start from scratch every time you begin a new job application, but you should assess each job description and make sure that your CV is emphasising the right skills and focusing on the most relevant parts of your career history in each case.

3. Eliminate all filler from your cover letter.

When applying for certain jobs, you will be required to accompany your CV with a cover letter that explains why you're applying for the role in question (and what makes you a good fit for it). Your cover letter is a great opportunity to make a glowing first impression, but no matter what you decide to put in this document, it needs to be concise and to-the-point. Once you've written your cover letter, read back over it and make sure that every single sentence has a point - if it doesn't add anything to the picture you're trying to paint, delete it! Employers won't enjoy reading a lot of pointless waffle that wastes their precious time, and a shorter, punchier cover letter will likely make more of an impact anyway.

4. Know how you're getting to the interview.

Showing up late for an interview is almost always a surefire way to not get the job. Once you've been told where you're being interviewed, take the time to plan your journey carefully: will you be walking, driving, or taking public transport? What time will you need to set out in order to arrive on time? Do you have an umbrella in case it rains on the day? Planning is key if you want to be sure of arriving on time (and not looking too dishevelled because you had to rush!).

5. Didn't get the job? Ask for feedback.

Even an unsuccessful job application can be valuable if you're able to learn from it and improve your approach for next time. If a prospective employer tells you that you didn't get the job, thank them for their time and ask them if they would be willing to provide any feedback. Did your answers leave something to be desired? Could you have dressed more appropriately for the interview? Was it simply a question of experience? You can't control every aspect of your job application, but constructive feedback can give you a better idea of what employers are looking for and how to present yourself in the best possible way.

Useful links:

Here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we hear so many instances of those competing for jobs in such competitive fields as finance, technology, engineering, and telecommunications simply sending their same, standard CV in relation to all manner of widely differing vacancies.

The truth is that finding a new job is very much a job in itself. If you want to maximise your chances of success in finding a new job, the following tips are likely to be extremely useful.


1. Thoroughly research the employer and role


This is a very important step when finding a new job.It's true what they say - knowledge is power, both in the application itself and at the interview. This will demonstrate that you have taken a real interest in both employer and role and should help them look upon your application favourably.


2. Familiarise yourself with the job requirements


Carefully peruse the job description and person specification when finding a new job. Make sure you have provided real examples in your application of how you match the requirements.


3. Tailor your CV to every application


Related to the above point, you should make sure that your CV completely and convincingly addresses the recruitment agency or employer's requirements, even if that means sending a slightly different CV for every application that you make.


4. Proofread, proofread and proofread again


Making a spelling or grammatical error in your job application is a sure way to get your CV binned by employers and recruitment agencies that may otherwise struggle to whittle down the pile of CVs that they receive. Don't give them an easy excuse to reject you!


5. Evidence your achievements


Did you merely 'lead a team'? Or did you achieve certain objectives or make certain breakthroughs while leading that team? For every claim of your suitability that you make, back it up with tangible evidence. This will help you both finding a new job and during the interview process. 


6. Make extensive use of the Internet


From registering with online job boards and recruitment agencies (see more below) to keeping an eye out for the latest vacancies posted on LinkedIn, where you should also have a complete and professional profile. There's plenty that you can do online to help your job chances.


7. Don't stick to the obvious advertised roles


Some vacancies are better publicised than others. To keep abreast of those less visible opportunities, maintain an open line of communication with potential employers and consider making speculative applications.


8. Ready yourself for your interview  


Prepare answers to the most likely interview questions in advance, and make sure you turn up in a timely manner and while dressed presentably.


9. Follow up applications by phone


Call no more than three days after your application and courteously ask if your application has been received while also emphasising your interest in the role and requesting details on what happens next.  


10. Take maximum advantage of recruitment agencies


A recruitment agency like Hyper Recruitment Solutions can be an invaluable partner in finding a new job and, helping you to find the most suitable vacancy quicker. 

Don't hesitate to get in touch with us if you are currently on the lookout for your next big role!

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