Manufacturing jobs

The onward march of technology has long been a double-edged sword in terms of its effect on employment.

On the one hand, technological advancement has created entirely new industries and led to increased efficiency, rapid production, and streamlining of the workplace in general.

On the other hand, automation has made a lot of formerly essential jobs obsolete, and those job losses will only become more widespread as the fields of AI and robotics continue to break new ground.

It's easy to see why so many people are looking for new lines of work that simply could not exist without human workers. So which jobs are safe from automation? And which are most at risk?

Jobs most at risk from automation

A 2017 report by consultancy firm McKinsey Global Institute projected that up to 800 million workers across the globe will lose their jobs to robots by 2030, noting that machine operators and food workers are likely to take the brunt of the hit.

While that may be a shocking statistic, technology reshaping the workplace is nothing new. In fact, it’s been a vital part of our evolution as a species - as time goes by, old jobs become redundant and new jobs become available that would have been inconceivable a few decades prior. The matchstick makers and lamplighters of yore couldn't possibly have imagined that their descendants would be designing websites, testing video games, and developing machine-learning algorithms for search engines.

Over the last half-century, however, jobs have been erased by technological advancement at an alarmingly fast pace. From switchboard operators to railway ticket sellers and the litany of factory jobs in between, it seems that no line of work is completely without risk of automation - even McDonald’s is creeping closer to fully-automated ordering with the growing influx of self-service machines.

But let’s not throw in the towel just yet. There are still plenty of vocations left that require a human touch!

What jobs are safe from automation?

According to BusinessInsider.com, the top 10 jobs least likely to become automated are almost exclusively health and social care role, with occupational therapists topping the list. Social workers are not far behind, closely followed by dentists, physicians, surgeons and nutritionists.

Outside of healthcare, creative jobs like choreography and exhibit designers also rank highly on the list. Creeping into the wider top 20, counselling and psychology roles rank well, as does teaching, while medical health and medical science are also fairly safe from the creeping threat of automation.

Industries likeliest to remain safe from automation

An Oxford University study titled The Future of Employment provides a great deal of insight into what human employment will look like in the future and, more importantly, the areas where human brains are most crucial.

Overall, healthcare and social sciences are the industries least likely to be automated in the foreseeable future. The human aspects of therapy and social care make these sectors relatively inaccessible for artificial intelligences. Boasting seven of the top ten jobs in the list, it seems that a career in healthcare is a fairly safe bet that shouldn’t see too much change in the foreseeable future.

Similarly, the emotional connection that's needed in the education sector also seems likely to ensure a steady future for teachers. Art & Design, Sport & Entertainment and Media are three other avenues that require individualistic input that is hard to replace with technology.

Skills needed for the jobs of the future

So what skills are most likely to secure steady employment in the future? Many industry experts point to three notable attributes:

  • Creativity - The expressive nature of creative jobs is not something that can be digitally automated, making proficiency in this a true asset that’s virtually future-proof.

  • Emotional intelligence - Empathy and emotional understanding are human characteristics that are notably absent in machines, safeguarding roles where human interaction is paramount. This is a big part of why healthcare professionals and social workers are unlikely to be replace by robots any time soon.

  • STEM proficiency - STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. These complex fields are relatively safe from automation, so a science or engineering degree should stand you in good stead for the future.

Looking for a career in the science or technology industries? Click the link below to browse vacancies from all over the UK!

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IS&T Sector

Information Systems and Technology is a rapidly-growing sector and has been for many years.

Commonly known as IS&T, many different jobs exist within this field, with more and more continually emerging through the evolution and growth of the industry. From Software Development to Data Management and Cyber Security Engineering, there are all kinds of IS&T roles for all sorts of different people.

But what are the skills needed to work in the IS&T industry and to become successful within this sector?

With such a broad range of roles available, employers within the IS&T industry look for a variety of different skills when seeking out new recruits. Some may seek candidates with expertise in a specific programming language or piece of software, while others may look for a more generic skill set. Here are just a few examples...

Key IS&T Skills

  • Communication – Contrary to the stereotypical view of IS&T professionals as socially-awkward introverts who struggle to talk to other human beings, communication skills are actually imperative within the IS&T industry. This is due to the cross-departmental nature of many roles within the field, where individuals are needed to work across many groups and teams. IS&T professionals often have to supply technological solutions for individuals who lack their expertise, and they are often called upon to discuss problems and solutions in a way that’s easy to understand. Additionally, IS&T professionals are often expected to present ideas and reports to other individuals and groups within the business they work in, again requiring good levels of communication.

  • Time Management – Many professionals within the IS&T sector are required to be self-motivated and self-managed, and a huge aspect of being self-managed requires the ability to have excellent time management skills. Work may often take longer than planned to complete; therefore, as an IS&T professional, you should be able to accurately evaluate how long a specific assignment is going to take to finish and then have the ability to stick to deadlines, whether that’s on a daily, weekly, monthly or task-by-task basis.

  • Coding – Coding is one of the very basic skills that any IS&T professional should possess, as it’s a skill that the vast majority of employers in this sector look for. If a business is looking to hire a programmer, the employer may seek an individual who is competent in multiple languages. Even for roles that may not specifically involve coding, an IS&T candidate should at least have a working knowledge of the simpler coding languages (such as C++ and HTML) and an understanding of the code-writing process in order to participate in software development projects and manage things such as quality assurance. Coding, however, requires more than just aptitude with languages - it requires logical thought, good problem solving skills, the ability to utilise various technologies, and of course an extensive understanding of information systems.

  • Networking – Networking is an extension of communication and concerns the ability to gather groups of people within a working environment to share the things that they know. This is done in order to shape a system of knowledge that is bigger than the parts within it.

These are just some of the many, many skills that a candidate looking for a position within the IS&T industry may be expected to have. Some roles require more specific skills; it is therefore recommended that, before you apply for any IS&T role, you read the full job description and are aware of all the skills required.

View & Apply for IS&T Jobs >

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Tech Jobs

'Technology' is a very broad term that covers a number of different sectors, all of which include all sorts of exciting and fascinating ob opportunities. Tech jobs are important as they shape so much of the world we know, as well as how we live, communicate, travel, eat and so much more.

If you are considering a career in science or technology, it may be hard to know where to start. We at Hyper Recruitment Solutions are dedicated to finding all the latest opportunities within the science and technology industry, and to pairing talented and passionate individuals with the up-and-coming companies that are currently recruiting new employees.

We are constantly updating our job listing pages, with new tech jobs being added to our database every day. To see our full list of jobs in the technology sector, please click the following link:

Browse Technology Jobs >

Technology covers a huge range of jobs, so once you've decided that this is the direction you would like to go in, you can then look into the more specific paths. This may include tech jobs in:

  • Bioinformatics
  • Pharmacology
  • Immunology
  • Biotechnology
  • Engineering
  • Food technology
  • Medical
  • Telecommunications

Not only are tech jobs diverse, they can also be very rewarding. This is because they often allow the employee to be a part of some exciting developments while also earning a great salary. This is what makes tech jobs so appealing, and this is why finding a job in technology is often a very competitive race.

Hyper Recruitment Solutions helps you through every part of the job search process, which makes it far more likely that you'll ultimately find work in your preferred field. From creating your CV to finding the right job opportunity and preparing for the interview, we can help you to land a job that you will be truly passionate about.

If you are still wondering where to find a tech job, please get in touch with our team of friendly specialists. We are more than happy to help you find a position that suits your skills and qualifications - contact us today!

Love it or hate it, there’s no denying it - social media is everywhere and it’s here to stay!

With Facebook boasting an impressive 2.27 billion monthly active users and Twitter a more than reasonable 336 million MAU, the question isn’t “is social media useful” but “just how useful can it be”.

 

social media for business tips

 

Why would a business use social media?

So, why use social media for business? Well firstly, because it’s free!

Whether or not social media will stay free in the long term is uncertain; however, for the immediate future at least, it remains free to use. As such, it’s definitely worth capitalising on, particularly if you are a start-up company or small growing business.

Promoting your company’s new products and special offers through traditional means such as newspapers, television or billboards ads can be expensive. So, the world of social media is the perfect place to advertise your business to thousands of customers without paying a penny!

 

Is social media better than traditional media?

It’s a well-known fact that word of mouth has consistently been one of the most effective ways to promote your business and products. However, time moves on and so does technology, allowing social media to that promotion one step further.

With so many people in one place, positive feedback can be instant and easily shared amongst thousands of people at the touch of a button. On the other hand, this also rings true for negative feedback, so it’s worth keeping that in mind.

 

Social media for business tips

Don’t forget, it’s also worth taking into considering that your social media strategy must be more than just a sales pitch, especially if you are looking to fully engage with potential customers.

No one enjoys talking to an automated answering machine and the same applies in the social media world. There’s nothing worse than having an inactive account that doesn’t interact with customers.

 

Benefits of social media for business

If used skilfully, social media can provide an opportunity for your company to directly engage with your customers on a more informal and personal level. For example, why stop at simply informing your customers about your new product; why not encourage them to post pictures of themselves actually using it?

Social media is a great way to think and be different from your competitors. Instead of just trying to get customers through the door, taking money and forgetting they ever existed, why not continue the conversation?

 

Final thoughts

Have you ever wondered what will happen to this new online generation in the coming years? Yes, you guessed it, they will become your customer base!

Even if you’re new to the social media world, it’s becoming essential that you have an online presence, so try to embrace this social technology.

Why not take a look at the HRS social media accounts below and see how we interacting and engaging with our audiences. What are we talking about? Are we connecting with you?

Did you know we update and post jobs on a daily basis? These are all visible across all our social media networks.

HRS Twitter | HRS Facebook | HRS LinkedIn | HRS Google+ | HRS YouTube

 

For more information on how to use social media for business, why not browse our other social media blogs or get in touch using the button below.

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