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When it comes to writing your CV, the hardest part is often getting started and actually putting pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard, as the case may be).

A CV is essentially your shop window to promote yourself and, like any shop window, it has to be attractive, neatly presented, and contain something of interest to grab the attention of passers-by.

Today, we're going to focus on achievements - let's run down exactly what achievements to include on your CV to make it shop-window ready.

 

How to Include Achievements on Your CV

A good CV should cover approximately two pages of A4, providing enough information about you, your skills and your achievements without going into unnecessary detail. Space is valuable and extremely limited, so make sure the whole document is solid gold from start to finish.

Be sure to include your recent job history, but don't just mention the duties and responsibilities of each job - really hone in and focus on the results you achieved while you were there.

If you managed a team of ten, go on to mention the fact that your team regularly surpassed their targets under your direction. If you were in charge of sales, include how much revenue was generated as a result of your hard work.

Remember, don't undersell yourself – you only get one chance to make a great first impression. Merely scratching the surface can do you and your skills a serious disservice, and this could be the difference between a callback and a courtesy email.

 

The Wow Factor

In addition to your career timeline and work history, it's important to include the various milestones you've achieved along the way. For job-specific accomplishments, this can be woven into your summary of the relevant job role; however, you may want to include these points in a separate box-out on your CV.

Opting to include achievements on a CV as a stand-alone section is a great way to highlight them to your potential employer, as well as emphasising their importance. This is your 'wow factor' space, reserved for the biggest achievements, ensuring they won't go unnoticed even by the busiest of skim-readers.

It's also a great opportunity to include achievements outside of your career roles, such as work experience, supplementary qualifications and notable feats that transfer well. If you have a relevant accomplishment that falls outside of your linear job history, this is the space to mention it.

 

Stay on Target

Speaking of transferable skills, that leads us nicely to the topic of relevance. Keeping your list of accomplishments applicable is extremely important and can highlight your suitability for the job at a glance.

While it may have been a glorious achievement at the time, that '2nd Place' badge from the junior school sports day sack race probably isn't that relevant when you're applying for a post-grad science job.

Similarly, a ten-man killstreak on Call of Duty may earn you points with the lads down the pub, but it's unlikely to impress your interviewer in terms of employability and suitability for a role.

Try to keep your CV achievements professional, recent, and relevant to the role in question. While additional experience outside of the stated job criteria can be helpful at times, it can also be surplus to requirements.

Read the job description and the person specification carefully, and aim to really tailor your CV to the role you're applying for. Don't distract your potential employer with excess information; grab their attention by checking the boxes you know they are looking to tick.

 

Paint by Numbers

A good CV should paint a vivid picture of the individual as a worker and what they can bring to the table. One of the easiest ways to make your value abundantly clear is to speak in a language most decision-makers will understand: numbers.

Quantifiable figures and statistics are a clear, concise way to illustrate the impact you had on a given outcome. As long as you're being truthful, they can also serve as verifiable evidence to back up your claim.

If you increased company productivity, don't be afraid to crow about just how much you did so. After all, 'My continued efforts increased team-wide productivity by 20%' sounds far more impressive than simply stating 'I increased productivity'.

This rule isn't reserved for percentages - it can also be used to great effect when applied to monetary figures. If your consultancy work saved your client thousands of pounds, be sure to mention just how much you saved them.

The same goes for sales: if you made X sales last month / quarter / year, include the number and don't be afraid to contextualise it. If your salary was £30k and you brought in £300k, simply stating that your sales paid for your salary ten times over can be an attractive point well made.

By now, you should have a good overall idea of what achievements to include on a CV and how to include them effectively. If you need any further CV advice, the following links may be of use to you:

CV Checklist   10 Common CV Mistakes

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how to tailor your cv

It takes time to craft the perfect CV that will land you job interviews and maximise your opportunities as a current or prospective professional in a science field like biotechnology, FMCG or pharmacology.

Although some candidates may be able to cope with a one-size-fits-all resume, tailoring your CV to individual job specifications is often vital to increasing your chances of securing a job interview and in turn, landing an all-important job offer.

Get the basics right

Before you can begin to tailor your CV to a specific job role or company, it is important to start with a strong, well-written generic CV. Collate your accomplishments, experiences, qualifications and any additional information that you consider appropriate – the importance of extracurricular activities, for instance, should not be ignored – to give employers a chance to understand who you are.

Find the job you wish to apply for                                           

The first step to tailor your CV is finding a science job for which you would like to apply. Conducting analysis of the qualifications and experience that top employers seek will help to give you an understanding of how to structure your CV – for example, placing a degree above job-specific training may be advantageous when applying for a particular role.

Remember that here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we advertise many great science jobs on our website, so whether you are on the lookout for your next big opportunity in regulatory affairs, quality assurance or bioinformatics, we are a great place to begin your job hunt.

Edit according to the job description

Reviewing job descriptions and editing your CV accordingly is the best way to begin the tailoring process. Arrange your CV so that your stated qualifications and accomplishments nicely match the requirements of the given role for which you would like to apply, and describe your work experience in the context of the job description. Recent graduates, for example, may want to gear the content of their CV towards their education, while those with experience in a junior science role may want to describe the valuable skills they acquired from it. 

Mirror the recruiter's language

Closely mirroring the specific 'buzzwords' that appear in a job specification will allow you to further tailor your CV and show the given science recruitment agency or employer that you understand their position and its requirements in full. Spending some time on the prospective employer's website and mimicking their language and style in your CV also allows you to research the culture and values of the organisation so that you are prepared in the event of being offered an interview.

Network for insider information

Use your professional network to find specific leads and contacts that you can use to your advantage. Ideally, get into an informal discussion with an employee from your targeted organisation for insights and insider information that you can use to sharpen your CV to the role.

Final thought

Although tailoring your CV for every job for which you apply can be time-consuming, it's true that hard work pays off. You should always try to avoid sending a generic, untailored CV to a prospective employer. Not only does a generic CV tend to communicate a lack of care and attention, but it can also waste both your own time and that of a prospective employer, increasing the likelihood of your application being cast away to the bottom of the pile.

Knowing how to tailor your CV to the science jobs for which you yearn is vital if you are to secure those all-important interviews.

Across the full glut of science jobs for which one may conceivably apply - ranging from biotechnology and pharmaceutical to engineering and R&D roles - there is the need to make your cv stand out

As much as we may wish to think that we are recruited on the basis of our skills and experiences, without a sufficiently eye-catching CV, such is the intense level of competition for the most desirable roles that it is doubtful we would get hired at all.

If you are wondering how to make your CV stand out, here are five of the best ways to keep eyes lingering on your resume.

1. Mirror the language used in the job posting

With studies indicating that the average recruiter spends just a few seconds considering a CV before accepting or rejecting it, chances are that your CV will only be scanned quite quickly.

You should make the recruiter's job easier, therefore, by including the very terms that are present throughout their initial job posting, to make it even clearer how your skills and experience relate to the role.

2. Avoid clichéd terms

So common are terms like 'team player', 'innovative', 'results focused' and 'highly qualified' on the average CV, that they have been reduced to meaningless fluff from the perspective of many hiring managers.

If you can't use more distinctive, unfamiliar terms, at least provide immediate, live examples of how you possess such characteristics, to prevent a bored reader simply drifting to the next CV in the pile.

3. Adapt your resume to each position

This is a source of consternation for so many science recruitment agencies, to the extent that many would regard it as disrespectful not to modify a CV for their specific position.

You might do this by re-arranging what appears on your CV, perhaps grouping your traits by skill area or job function. Alternatively, you might have a reverse chronological CV, which can show how you have gathered competencies relevant to your new position over time.

4. Explain any employment gaps

Many recruiters for science jobs will reject a CV as soon as they see an unaccounted-for gap, preferring to save their limited interviewing time for candidates who don't seem to have something to hide.

It is, therefore, a better bet to properly explain why you may have been unemployed for a certain period of time, and how you nonetheless used that time productively.

5. Don't be afraid to brag

Your CV is not supposed to be modest. It is there to quickly make a positive impression on a complete stranger, so you should tell them everything great about you that means they need to hire you right now - from relevant previous jobs to coveted awards and big promotions.

If you can convince science recruitment agencies that you are something special, they will be much more likely to urgently call you to interview - whatever the science role for which you are applying.


By following these 5 simple tips, you will go a long way to making your CV stand out from the competition. For more information or advice on how to make your CV stand out, then please visit our website or get in touch with a member of our team today!

cv first impressions 

Hyper Recruitment Solutions (HRS) are here to help you reach your career destination and the first step on the road to a new role is a quality CV.

 

Whether you are looking for a job in science, engineering or technology, the formula for creating the right CV should always be the same. Your CV is designed to do one thing – get you that all-important job interview.

 

However, like a face-to-face interview, CV first impressions also count for a lot and can be just as important – if not more so.

 

Remember, your CV is a reflection of yourself, so it's important that it's well laid out and looks professional. A good CV should sell your skills, highlight your experience and show potential employers exactly why YOU are the right person for the job.

 

Of course, how you write your CV is entirely up to you; however, there are some basic rules to follow if you want to create the best impression. Head over to our CV Advice and Tips section for the ins and outs of creating a great CV.

 

If you haven’t written a CV for some time, have questions about what to include or want to know more about an effective CV layout, why not get in touch today using the button below?

Our expert team are happy to recommend any necessary changes, ensuring your CV stands out at the top of the pile.

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