Science Jobs

As a leading and highly compliant recruitment company, here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we take pride in matching those seeking science jobs with the most rewarding roles, particularily the science careers in demand.

While science is naturally a field in which the range of roles is extremely varied - even jobs with the same or similar titles potentially carrying very different responsibilities and calling upon rather distinct skills - the below five roles are some of the main science careers in demand.


Qualified Person (QP)

European regulations dictate that there be a Qualified Person (QP) to decide on batch releases of medicinal products. This is one of the main science careers in demand, as each given batch cannot be certified for release until it has first been thoroughly verified that it was manufactured in accordance with relevant GMP (good manufacturing practice) regulations, which necessitates a wide range of responsibilities for the QP.


Regulatory affairs officer

Also known as a regulatory affairs specialist or manager, a person in this post bridges the gap between companies and regulatory authorities, ensuring the manufacture and distribution of products in line with relevant legislation. Duties typically range from the study of scientific and legal documents to the planning and undertaking of regulatory inspections and product trials.


Clinical research manager

Clinical research managers are given overall responsibility within pharmaceutical or medical fields for preparing protocols and case report forms, the approval of ethics committees and the management of clinical trials. They may also be expected to provide clinical trial materials and ensure that trials are smoothly monitored, through the identification and management of qualified staff and the establishment of suitable audit procedures.


Validation engineer

Validation engineers play a key role in the development and manufacturing process for products ranging from pharmaceuticals to cars, through their measurement, analysis and calibration of the equipment and processes necessary to ensure only the highest quality products.

This job role is a vastly in-demand science career as validation engineers are also required in such sectors as aerospace, biotechnology and computer software. Their duties include testing, the overseeing of other validation technicians' work and the establishment of validation standards.


Packaging Technologist

Another large science career in demand is a Packaging Technologist. This is ideal for those with plenty of design flair and a passion for technology, packaging technologists are involved in the design and development of product packaging. Working with manufacturers and other professionals, packaging technologists operate under time and budgetary constraints to deliver a finished packaging design.

Such goods as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, food and drink, toiletries and household cleaning products all need to be packaged, and a packaging technologist's duties typically include the production of sample packaging, the running of production trials and tests and the creation of artwork in conjunction with packaging designers.

Although the best jobs in these fields can be scarce and the level of competition extremely fierce, Hyper Recruitment Solutions can put job seekers in touch with the most advantageous opportunities for their burgeoning science careers, in keeping with its status as one of the principal science recruitment agencies. We aim to help you have an opportunity to get the most in-demand science jobs. 

Are you on the hunt for a new science job? Take a look at the wide range of science jobs we have available on our Science Job Search page by clicking below!

Browse Latest Science Jobs >

"Why should we hire you?" is as common a question on the lips of science recruitment professionals as it is among hiring teams in any other sector, and it takes forms that can easily catch out the ill-prepared interviewee. You may be asked what makes you the right fit for the position, why you are the best candidate for the vacancy or what you would bring to the job. Before you go for the interview you need to ask yourself, "why should you hire me?", and come up with an answer. 

Follow these simple steps to ensure you are properly prepared to answer any employer who asks "why should we hire you":

Be employer-focused

One of the first things that any applicant must realise about this question is that they really must answer it from the employer's perspective. It can be easy to effectively only answer why you would like the job - for example, because you have always had an interest in biochemistry or R&D, need the money or would like to move to wherever the role is based. These are not answers to the question of why the employer should hire you.

The frank truth is that a hiring manager does not really care about the benefits to you of getting the job. They're much more concerned about the risk to their position if they make a poor choice of employment, such as someone who leaves the organisation prematurely or does not fit in well with their colleagues or the company philosophy.


They are certainly interested in your ability to do the job to an exceptional standard, get on well with your colleagues and bring skills and experiences that make you stand out from the other candidates.

The information that you must give

Therefore, by setting out an answer that clearly details such factors as your industry experience, relevant past accomplishments, soft skills, technical skills, education/training and/or awards/certifications, you are making the hiring manager's professional life much easier.

When you communicate memorably and confidently that you possess these traits that answer the employer's pain points, whether their field is chemistry, molecular biology, immunology or something completely different, they will be more confident to trust you with the role.

But remember...

With this being only one of the potentially many interview questions, not all of the above parameters necessarily need to be included in your answer. This question is a golden opportunity to sell yourself for your dream clinical, biochemistry or pharmacology role. However, such 'selling' is generally best done with just three or four powerful points - backed up with easy-to-remember descriptions and/or examples - than with a quickly rifled-off list of 12 strengths that you are unable to explain further.

The employer should be left in no doubt as to your unique combination of relevant experience and skills. "Why should we hire you?" will not be your only opportunity during the interview to make that clear - which is all the more reason to provide well-selected highlights rather than the full catalogue of your credentials.

However, it is so often a memorably convincing answer to this or any number of the aforementioned similar questions that separates those who secure sought-after science jobs from those who don't. Good luck!


Whether in pharmacology, immunology, quality assurance or R&D, securing those prized science jobs depends on more than just getting your CV right - you will also need to negotiate what may be some seriously bruising interview questions.

Here are just five that you might face, along with suitable responses.

1. Why should you get this job?

This question calls for good pre-interview preparation. Before walking into the room, pick out three to five characteristics from your CV that make you indispensable, backed up with examples. Employers want to see evidence of a strong track record.

2. Where do you see yourself in three to five years?

Responding with "I have no idea" - as truthful as it may be - suggests that you have little idea what direction your career is going in or for how long you intend to be in the job. A much better approach is to say you have carefully assessed your career aims and learned that you can best develop in the role for which you are being interviewer.


3. What was the worst aspect of your last role?

 Again, telling the truth - such as that you hated the hours or your boss - may be tempting, but in doing so, you can inadvertently reveal a weakness of your own. This, of course, is why the question is being asked. It's more advisable to instead say that your responsibilities were not sufficiently challenging - or something similar that would indicate you are ready for the step up.

4. Why is there a gap in your work history?

Answering this one well is much easier if you can demonstrate that you have actually spent your time in-between jobs productively. Employers understand that from time to time, people can lose their jobs and not always immediately find another one. However, time spent looking after family members, volunteering or undertaking freelance projects can all help to make you more marketable from a science recruitment perspective.

5. What is your greatest weakness?

This is yet another question that draws out unwitting admissions of weakness in ill-prepared candidates. You can avoid becoming one of them by stating a 'weakness' that could be equally easy considered a strength - for example, a tendency to say yes and over-commit. Follow this with an example of how you are becoming better at prioritising, and you will look like an even better candidate for the job.

 

In all science jobs - whether in chemistry, molecular biology, quality assurance, engineering or R&D - a well-written CV is extremely important.

Today we're looking at 10 of the biggest CV mistakes to avoid when you're applying for a job in science. 

1) Too long

You shouldn't require more than two or three pages for a CV. Venturing onto a fourth or even fifth page is a rookie CV mistake, and employers will get the impression that you are disorganised and tend to ramble on.

2) Misspellings and typos

This is an obvious CV mistake to avoid but that doesn't prevent it being made time and time again. Be sure to run your CV through a grammar and spelling checker before you send it off to any prospective employers. 

3) Irrelevant information

Talking about ghost hauntings at your last job (unless you're applying for a ghostbuster job!) or that you were the best dancer in the office isn't likely to endear you to science recruitment agencies seeking only salient information. Be sure to check if everything on your CV is relevant before making the CV mistake. 

4) Falsified information

Saying that you passed a degree, diploma or certificate that you actually failed isn't a mere bending of the truth - it's an outright lie that will almost certainly catch up with you later.

5) Cliches

Simply saying that you are a "good communicator" or "work well in a team" without backing it up with any hard evidence is meaningless to any demanding recruiter and another common CV mistake.

6) Wrong contact details

Even the most brilliant CV might be of little use if the phone number or email address on it is wrong.  Be wary of writing .com where you should have said .co.uk, or giving the address of your previous rather than current address

7) A one-size-fits-all approach

Don't send out the same CV for an information systems job as you would for a procurement role - the CV needs to match the employer's needs, so adapt it to each application.

8) Vague explanations

Simply saying that you are looking for a new challenge that offers the opportunity for professional growth doesn't much serve a potential employer. Instead, state something more specific that focuses on their needs, not just your own.

9) Fancy font

You might want to stand out through your CV, but you can do that best by demonstrating your unique qualifications for the role, rather than merely using an unconventional font that might merely distract the reader.

10) Name and personal details in the header

The technology used by many science recruitment firms today to process applications may not pick up information included in the document header, so we would advise that such crucial details are kept in the main text.

There are many potential reasons why you may not secure an interview and many common CV mistakes that can be made. Don't allow any of these easily avoided errors to be the cause of your own next job application failure. 

Do you want to hire a true game-changer? The answer to that question might seem to be "yes" for every new person that you recruit, but there is a particular type of candidate that has recently attracted the attention of HR managers in many science companies for varying departments, including Quality Assurance, Regulatory Affairs, R&D and : the 'purple squirrel'.



These especially rare individuals are associated with a combination of exceptional talent and an often 'maverick' personality type that can make them difficult to manage. While they are therefore not necessarily the best team players, being somewhat unconventional at times, there are nonetheless significant rewards to be had when they are successfully integrated.

At their best, the 'purple squirrel' can bring dazzling new perspectives to your organisation and push it in a decisive and successful new direction - possessing the education, skills and experience to be major innovators. Celebrated businesspeople who have been described as 'purple squirrels' include James Dyson, Philip Green and David Ogilvy.

However, it is many of the unique characteristics of the 'purple squirrel' that can also make them difficult to pick up via the more traditional recruitment methods. None of the three aforementioned individuals, for example, possessed a university degree, meaning that they would have been missed by a more competency-based hiring approach.

Instead, science employers looking to pick up a 'purple squirrel' are advised to apply more aspiration-based search and hiring techniques. To know where to look, it is a good idea to first ask yourself what incredible results you would like your organisation to achieve. You will then be able to start defining the kind of person who could produce them.

Adopting this more lateral perspective will lead you to consider individuals who you might not have ordinarily deemed suitable for your vacancy. However, it is also crucial to understand the very different motivations that 'purple squirrels' can have. Such candidates are much more likely to ask about your company's direction and values than the size of the financial package on offer or how many promotions they could rack up.

The key to finding the elusive 'purple squirrel' is disruptive talent searching, rather than the received wisdom of more established recruitment methods. Land such a candidate, however, and your organisation could be set for a new era of innovation and profitability - just as long as it is willing to adapt in turn to the exciting newcomer. 

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