Finding a job while pregnant

Trying to find a job while you're expecting a baby can make what is already a fairly stressful time very trying indeed. However, there's no reason why you can't secure a new role during this exciting period of your life - here's some expert advice that we hope will make the job-hunting process as easy possible:

Do I have to disclose that I'm pregnant?

Potential employers are not allowed to ask whether you're planning to have a baby when deciding whether or not to hire you (and if you choose to inform them of your pregnancy, this cannot affect their final decision). According to UK law, you must be given the same consideration as a candidate who is not pregnant.

What should I look for in a new job?

You need to carefully consider how your situation is going to change over the course of your pregnancy and beyond. Important logistical questions include:

  • How flexible are the hours?
  • How will you get to work, and how long will the journey take?
  • Will you need childcare after the baby arrives, and will it be available near your place of work?
If at all possible, you don't want your new job to add too much extra stress to your life at this busy time.

Will I be entitled to parental leave?

Yes - if you are giving birth, you are legally entitled to 26 weeks of statutory leave, regardless of how long you've been in your job or how much you get paid. Whether your employer offers any further maternity leave after this will depend on the company's own policies.

Browse Job Listings from HRS >

Recent reports suggest that almost half (42%) of workers in the UK are "staying in roles they are unhappy in because self-doubt stops them from applying for their dream job" (London Evening Standard).

If you're thinking about changing jobs, then keep reading - we at Hyper Recruitment Solutions have put together this helpful guide to help you decide whether it's the right time to move. We'll highlight some of the things you'll want to think about before changing jobs, and offer some tips to help you with your search for a new role.

Should I Change Jobs?

If any of the following apply to you, it might be time to think about changing jobs:

  • You are bored at work. If you find yourself constantly watching the clock while at work, it might be time to ask your supervisor for more responsibility or a more varied set of tasks to take on. If your current role is unable to challenge you, it might be time to go elsewhere. Boredom is a sign that you're not working to your full potential.

  • The company's culture has changed. Sometimes, a change in your working environment can make you feel uncomfortable. Perhaps you have a new supervisor who takes a different approach to management, or perhaps there are ethical issues within the company that have only recently surfaced. Whatever the problem is, if the culture of your workplace doesn't suit you, it can be very difficult to feel motivated or happy at work and this can be reason enough to leave.

  • Your career path looks limited. Can you see yourself progressing in the company? If the answer is no, it might be time to seek out a new challenge. Staying in a dead-end job can, of course, be a comfortable option, but it's not especially rewarding. Most people can expect to progress in both position and pay the longer they with a particular employer. If that doesn't appear to be the case in your current occupation, it's probably time to look elsewhere.

  • You are constantly tired and/or stressed. Stress and fatigue can eventually cause you serious damage both physically and mentally. It's important to feel like you can achieve what is expected of you during the working day without undue stress or physical exertion. If you are struggling to cope with the demands of your current role, it might be worth reducing your hours or looking for a less demanding position.

  • You're good at your job, but you don't like it. You might be successful, but are you happy? Job satisfaction is just as important as job success - maybe you've spent a long time working to achieve your current position, but is it really worth staying if you despise coming in for work each day? Work takes up a huge portion of our adult lives, so if you feel unhappy with what you are currently doing, it might be worth taking a risk and trying something else that you really enjoy. It's never too late to make a change!

Before giving your notice, consider the following:

  • Lots of short-term roles look bad on a CV. Employers might not take you seriously if your CV has a string of short-term employments on it, especially if you're now applying for a more senior role with lots of responsibilities. Consider looking for ways to improve your current situation rather than jumping ship within a few months of arriving.

  • It's important to consider how other jobs compare to your current role. If you're thinking about changing jobs, you may well be struggling to see the positives of your present situation. However, there is always a possibility that your new job will be worse than your current job - spend some time writing a list of pros and cons before handing in your notice, and this will help you to evaluate whether you really dislike your job as much as you think you do.

  • Don't leave because of one bad day. If you're having a hard time at work right now, quitting ASAP may seem like the only way out. But if you leave because of one bad day or an unusually stressful week, you may find yourself regretting it in the future. Things can change rapidly, so try to view leaving as a last resort if possible.

Tips for finding a great new job:

  • Look for roles that spark your interest and offer a challenge. You'll want to avoid moving into a position that is every bit as boring and unchallenging as your current role. During job interviews, ask about opportunities for training and progression within the company - not only will this help you to choose a job with real possibilities, it will also show the interviewer that you are ambitious, highly motivated, and prepared to really push yourself.

  • Don't be scared to take a risk - it might pay off! As we mentioned at the top of this article, many people stay in jobs they hate because of simple self-doubt. Making such a drastic change to your life can be extremely daunting, but it can also be endlessly rewarding. Don't let yourself be paralysed by fear!

  • Stay positive! If you start looking for a new job with a negative attitude, you are far less likely to succeed in your search. Deciding to start a new chapter of your life should be an exciting experience, and starting with a positive outlook should make the whole process much easier.
If you're ready to look for a new job, take a look at Hyper Recruitment Solutions' science job listings - we have hundreds of vacancies in the science and technology sectors, and we can help to ensure that your transition into your new job is enjoyable and stress-free.

Data Analyst

There are lots of great roles available for talented data analysts in the UK, but as with just about any career, you'll only get the job if you ace the interview.

When applying for a job in data analysis, you can expect all the usual questions about your biggest weaknesses, where you see yourself in five years' time, etc. But you will also be asked some more specific questions that are unique to this particular field.

Every employer will ask different questions, of course, but here are 5 examples of the sort of question you can generally expect to hear:


In your own words, describe what a data analyst does.

This question may crop up if the employer wants to make sure you actually understand the role that's up for grabs. It can also give them a bit of insight into how you see yourself and what you'll prioritise if you get the job.

Try to go into a bit of detail here, as this will demonstrate that you have a firm grasp of the subject in question. A generic answer that only scratches this surface might make the interviewer suspect that you don't really know what you're talking about.


What software are you proficient with?

Obviously, the interviewer will want to make sure you're familiar with the programs that are necessary to the job. The job description probably specified certain requirements (e.g. 'knowledge of MySQL'), and hopefully, you wouldn't have applied for the job if you didn't meet them!

Of course, you should always be honest with your answers in a job interview, especially when it comes to questions like this. The interviewer will probably be able to tell if you're lying about your ability to use a particular type of software, and even if you manage to convince them, you'll soon be found out when you start work.


Explain how you'd solve this problem...

Data analysis is all about solving problems, and it's quite common for applicants to be given specific examples during a job interview. This will give the interviewer a chance to see you think on your feet.

The point of this exercise isn't to provide the solution right there and then, but to explain the process you would use to find it. You'll get extra points for creativity and clarity, so be sure to think carefully before you respond.


Tell us about a problem you failed to solve, or a deadline you failed to meet.

This is a twist on that old classic: 'tell me your biggest weakness'. Pretending that you've never, ever failed at anything is a bad idea - instead, you should try to talk about a disappointing experience that nevertheless taught you an important lesson. The right response is one that demonstrates your ability to learn from your mistakes while also showing that you're able to cope well with stress and setbacks.

Try to avoid blaming other people when responding to this question. The interviewer wants to know about your failings, not somebody else's, and shifting the blame can make you seem like someone who can't admit when it's their fault - not an attractive quality in a potential employee.


Why did you choose to become a data analyst?

Employers generally prefer to recruit people who are genuinely interested in their work - after all, we tend to try harder when the task is something we care about.

This question is an opportunity to give the interviewer a glimpse of your personality, and again, it tells them more about what the job means to you. Try not to focus too much on the money - instead, explain why you enjoy problem solving, working with data, and using numbers to tell stories and make decisions.

Apply for Data Analyst Jobs >

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Microbiology

Microbiology is a burgeoning field, and microbiologists can earn upwards of £30,000 a year (depending on the nature of the role and the candidate's qualifications / experience level).

But what exactly does a microbiologist do? In order to answer that, let's start with a more basic question...

What is Microbiology?

Moicrobiology is the study of microscopic organisms (microorganisms) such as bacteria and viruses. There are many different branches of microbiology, including:

  • Bacteriology (the study of bacteria)
  • Virology (the study of viruses)
  • Mycology (the study of fungi)
  • Phycology (the study of algae)
Generally speaking, the term 'microbiology' can be applied to the study of any living organism that is too small to been with the naked eye.

So that's a rough overview of what microbiology is - now, let's return to our original question. What does a microbiologist do on an average working day?

Microbiologist Job Description

Microbiologists typically work within the medical and life science industries, but can be found in a variety of other sectors too. A degree in Microbiology or a closely-related discipline (e.g. Biomedical Science) tends to be the minimum requirement to enter this line of work, although this may not be mandatory for some junior positions.

As a microbiologist, you'll be spending most of your time in a laboratory, studying microorganisms with the aid of a microscope. If you find yourself working within the healthcare sector, you will most likely be working to understand and prevent different types of infection; elsewhere, you might be required to develop enzyme indicators or analyse biological samples.

Hyper Recruitment Solutions is a leading light in UK science recruitment. Use the link below to browse our latest microbiology vacancies, or create your candidate account here.

Apply for Microbiology Jobs >

Lord Sugar's business partner becomes first winner of The Apprentice to reach £1m profit

Ricky Martin with his business partner Lord Sugar

  • Former winner of The Apprentice and CEO of Hyper Recruitment Solutions (HRS) Ricky Martin leads company to a pre-tax profit of over £1m

  • HRS set to turn over £10m in the 2018 calendar year

  • Projected turnover for the next HRS financial year (July 2018 - June 2019) is £14m

Crowned winner of The Apprentice in 2012, and following the investment from Lord Sugar, Hyper Recruitment Solutions (HRS) was founded focusing on mid-level and senior recruitment in STEM industries globally; and today announces huge success, reaching the £1m profit mark.

HRS turned over a staggering £8m in the 12 months up to June 2018, achieving a 106% growth on profit and a 90% growth on turnover. Following on from the previous year’s 34% growth on profit and 59% on turnover. In the past 12 months alone, HRS has broken all company records on both sales and profit whilst managing to restructure and expand.

With two new locations in Manchester and Edinburgh alongside the founding company site based in Essex, the successful business now boasts 50 employees across the business. The company’s rapid expansion has resulted in a newly formed internal training academy together with focus on recruitment development, showcasing employee retention and return on investment in the first 12 months, snowballing from 30% to 80%. The expansion of staff by 50% has proved to be HRS’s most expensive, yet most successful year to date.

With continued success in mind, HRS have big plans for the next two years, looking to continue growth as the leading recruitment partner for science industries across the UK as well as a plan to focus on developing the businesses presence and offering across Europe.

Ricky Martin, CEO of Hyper Recruitment Solutions, says: “I couldn’t be prouder of the whole team at HRS who have got us to where we are today. To have grown from a company of just one back in 2012 to a business with 50 staff across 3 major UK cities, that makes a difference to so many people, is remarkable.”

Lord Sugar commented: “Investing in Ricky was a no-brainer, his understanding of the recruitment industry combined with his passion for business has resulted in the success Hyper Recruitment Solutions sees today. Being the first Apprentice winner to hit the £1m pre-tax profit mark is just the start, I know the future is bright for HRS going forward.”

HRS further plan to reinvest the business profit into talent at the business, growing their specialist workforce and continuing to provide the training and development needed to maintain their standards of employing the most professional and ethical recruiters in the industry.

Mr Martin added: “Money has always been secondary to changing lives in my eyes, however to do so and become the first winner of The Apprentice to break the £1m profit milestone in a single company year, is a huge success and I couldn’t be more thrilled!”

Making strides in the recruitment world, HRS ensures they give back to communities proving they’re not solely in it for profit. The business currently partners with charities Jeans for Genes, Alzheimer’s Society and Apps 4 Good which all make a difference to the sectors they recruit for, namely science, technology and engineering.

Mr Martin continued: “The reason Lord Sugar invested in to my business idea is because I was not just a recruiter. I was somebody who wanted to support talent in a specialist sector, which makes a real difference. It’s this passion for doing the right thing that has seen HRS go from strength to strength; and is why our financials have followed suit!”

Visit Hyper Recruitment Solutions >

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