Pharmeceutical Industry

Working in the pharmaceutical industry allows you to change people’s lives for the better.

The pharmaceutical industry works to improve many people’s lives by researching, developing, making and marketing medicines. This industry is home to a varied range of incredibly rewarding jobs.

Here are a few reasons why you should consider working in the pharmaceutical industry.

The pharmaceutical industry is continuously growing

The pharmaceutical industry currently employs around 736,358 people in Europe and more than 854,000 in the United States, according to the IFPMA. It is thought that there are around 70,000 pharmaceutical jobs based in the UK alone.

This is a growing industry, and the number of jobs in the pharmaceutical industry is expected to continue rising. If you choose to work in pharmaceuticals, you will not have to worry about the industry becoming redundant.

Pharmaceutical companies employ people from different educational backgrounds

As the pharmaceutical industry is so large, it is able to take on and train up individuals with a variety of education levels. From training those with GCSEs as apprentices to funding research for those with PhDs or equivalent, the pharmaceutical industry offers something for everyone.

Employees who work for pharmaceutical companies very often receive training and gain experience with new processes and technologies. This in itself is another reason you should consider working in the pharmaceutical industry.

The pharmaceutical industry generally pays more than other industries

Every job within the pharmaceutical industry requires a high level of motivation and competence. It is a demanding industry in which hard work is handsomely rewarded, so your pay will be more than enough to put a smile on your face.

According to recent market analysis, the average pharmaceutical job pays £37,500 a year. This varies substantially across the different jobs within the field. For example, the Marketing and Advertising Sector pays around £62,500 on average, whereas a secretary will still get a good salary of around £25,000.

It is an industry which never stands still

If you’re thinking about changing jobs because your current role has become monotonous, the pharmaceutical industry will change everything for you. There are very few boring jobs in pharmaceuticals, and the industry is always looking for dynamic new recruits who want to achieve great things.

If you choose a career in pharmaceuticals, you will constantly be a part of new breakthroughs and developments in the industry.

The pharmaceutical industry covers a huge range of jobs and roles, so you will have your pick of working environments. With constant room for career development and individual growth, there’s never a dull day in the pharmaceutical industry.

Have we persuaded you that you should work in pharmaceuticals? If so, click here to browse the latest pharmaceutical vacancies from Hyper Recruitment Solutions.

What to Wear to a Job Interview

Job interviews are all about making a good first impression, and nothing makes or breaks a first impression like how you're dressed. When a potential employer invites you to an interview, you should immediately start thinking about what to wear - what is the right outfit for this interview?

To some extent, of course, the answer to that question will depend on what sort of job you're interviewing for, but it's always important to look neat and professional. Even if you're hoping to land a role at a trendy tech start-up where all the employees wear T-shirts and jeans, it pays to look smart for the interview.

With that in mind, here - courtesy of the team here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions - are some top tips to help you get dressed for that career-making job interview:

  • First of all, be prepared. Don't wait until the day of the interview to select your outfit (especially if you're indecisive - showing up late won't look good regardless of what you're wearing!). Pick your clothes a few days in advance, and get them out of wardrobe to check that they're clean and crease-free. Leave yourself plenty of time to do laundry and ironing, just in case.

  • Don't dress too outrageously. Novelty ties, plunging necklines, garishly bright colours...a good interview outfit avoids all of these things. You want the interviewer to remember you for your articulate and intelligent answers, not for your red polka-dot shirt or your skimpy dress.

  • Be moderate with make-up, jewellery and scents. A drop of cologne or a touch of make-up? No problem. But you're not going on a date or hitting the clubs - you're applying for a job, so there's no need to do yourself up too extravagantly.

  • You're not there to show off your fashion sense. By all means wear nice, modern-looking clothes - you don't want to look like you've stepped through a portal from the 1970s. But unless you're interviewing for a post at some glossy magazine, your clothes shouldn't be trying to persuade the interviewer of your smashing fashion sense. Make a good impression by looking tidy and together, not by dressing for the catwalk.

  • Check your hair. Like clothing, hair can have a very powerful impact on what people think when they meet you for the first time. Your hairdo should be as neat and tidy as your outfit, so spend a little time sorting it out before you set off for the interview (and don't be afraid to go for a trim if you need it).

  • It's better to be overdressed than underdressed. It's an enormously clichéd piece of advice to offer, but 'dress for the job you want, not the job you have' is a good saying to bear in mind when pondering what to wear to a job interview. Most employers will expect interviewees to look reasonably smart even if they allow their employees to dress casually, and if in doubt, it's always safer to dress formally. In the vast majority of cases, business attire will make a far better impression than the clothes you wear around the house.

If you need more interview preparation tips, be sure to visit our Interview Advice page!

Still looking for your dream job? Browse the latest science and technology vacancies here.

Image courtesy of pixabay.com

Stethoscope - Class 1 Medical Device

From bandages to breast implants, all medical devices are classified according to the risks they potentially pose to patients (as well as the level of regulation involved in their manufacturing, marketing and usage).

Under EU law, medical devices are sorted into the following categories:

  • Class I
  • Class IIa
  • Class IIb
  • Class III

About Class I Medical Devices

Class I medical devices are low-risk products that are subject to relatively little regulation. Examples of Class I medical devices include stethoscopes, bandages, and surgical masks.

The defining characteristic of any Class I medical device is that is poses little or no risk to patients. The greater the risk posed, the more regulation is required, the higher the medical device's classification.

In the UK, medical devices are subject to the Medical Devices Regulations 2002.

Image courtesy of pixabay.com

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