FMCG stands for fast-moving consumer goods. An FMCG company is any company that produces these goods. Well-known FMCG companies include Unilever, Nestlé and The Coca-Cola Company.

Examples of fast-moving consumer goods

The definition of FMCG is very broad - any items that are sold at relatively low prices and consumed relatively quickly may be considered examples of 'fast-moving consumer goods'. Most of the products in your local supermarket probably qualify.

Common FMCGs include:
  • Fruit and veg
  • Meat
  • Soft drinks
  • Dairy products
  • Bread and other baked goods
  • Toiletries (e.g. toothpaste, deodorant)
  • Alcohol and tobacco
  • Confectionery
  • Batteries
  • Some forms of medication
FMCGs are sold in high volumes at low prices and used up rapidly (as opposed to durable goods - such as cars, appliances and furnishings - which are purchased less frequently and expected to last much longer).



Challenges for FMCG companies

There's a lot of money to be made in the FMCG industry, but these goods tend to have a small profit margin and - in many cases - a short shelf life. This means that, in order to thrive, FMCG companies must strive to sell as many units as they can as quickly and as consistently as they can. This requires shrewd marketing (to get people to make an initial purchase) and high product quality (to keep people coming back for more purchases going forward).

Other challenges for FMCG companies include:
  • Extending shelf life of perishable goods
  • Reducing impact on the environment (e.g. from discarded packaging)
  • Keeping costs low enough to compete on price

Roles within the FMCG industry

The FMCG industry is very large and extremely varied, with all sorts of roles available for all sorts of different skill sets. Talented workers from STEM fields are highly sought-after in this sector, as these are the people who can help FMCG companies to:
  • Improve product quality / effectiveness
  • Drive down costs via technological advancements
  • Boost shelf life by delaying product expiration
  • Create more environmentally-friendly products and packaging solutions
The ingenuity, expertise and creativity of skilled scientists have long been crucial to the success of the world's largest FMCG companies, and there's no shortage of roles for gifted science/technology workers in this particular sector.


Image courtesy of pixabay.com
Telephone Interview

So you've just heard back from that job you applied for, and it's good news: they were impressed with your CV, and you've made it through to the interview stage. However, this won't be a traditional, face-to-face job interview - as it turns out, this particular employer prefers to do things over the phone.

You might be pleased to hear this at first. On paper, a telephone interview sounds quite a bit easier than the alternative: no need to get a haircut, no need to iron your interview suit, no need to worry about how you're going to get there on time. All you have to do is pick up the phone and have a conversation. Simple, right?

But being interviewed over the phone rather than meeting your potential employer in the flesh does have its disadvantages. For example...

  • The employer won't be able to connect with you in quite the same way as if you were right there in front of them. Facial expressions and body language are important when you're trying to get someone to warm to you, but you can't rely on them during a phone interview - instead, you're forced to present yourself well and get your points across using speech alone.

  • Similarly, you won't be able to use the interviewer's physical cues to assess how well (or not) the interview is going. It can be difficult to give a relaxed and confident performance when you don't know whether the person you're talking to is smiling or frowning.

  • Telephone interviews tend to be shorter and less in-depth than traditional job interviews, which leaves you with a significantly smaller window of opportunity. Less time means fewer chances to talk yourself up and persuade the interviewer of your suitability for the role.

  • While it can be nice to conduct a job interview from the comfort of your own living room, the home environment can be distracting and detrimental to the professional image you're trying to project. Many a remote interview has been interrupted by a child or pet wandering into the room at an inopportune moment, and even if you're home alone, there's still a chance that the doorbell will ring, or that you'll get sidetracked by one of the many other things vying for your attention.

By now, you should be beginning to realise that telephone interviews aren't necessarily the walk in the park that they may resemble at first glance. There are a lot of obstacles to overcome, and we haven't even mentioned the fact that some people genuinely struggle to talk on the phone (even if they're perfectly outgoing and eloquent in person).

But don't despair - you can still ace your phone interview and land the job of your dreams without a hitch. To help you do so, here are five top telephone interview tips from the experts here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions:

1. Choose the right space.

Our phones go everywhere we go nowadays, which means that it's possible to take calls in the park, the car, the supermarket, and just about anywhere else you fancy. However, if at all possible, you should avoid conducting a job interview while on the go; instead, find a quiet, secluded room where you can be fairly certain you won't be interrupted. Try to choose somewhere with as few distractions and diversions as possible.

2. Focus on the task at hand.

Ideally, you shouldn't be doing anything else while you're being interviewed. You wouldn't doodle or surf the web or watch TV during a face-to-face job interview, so you should absolutely avoid those activities when on the phone. And don't eat anything during the call - it's impolite, and the person on the other end might have a hard time understanding you with your mouth full.

3. Make notes beforehand.

It never hurts to prepare. Keep your CV handy throughout the call (along with your cover letter, the company's details, and anything else that might prove useful) so that you can quickly refer to key information as necessary. Before the interview, you may also wish to draft answers to common questions so that you won't 'um' and 'ah' too much when you're in the hot seat. If you don't think it will be too much of a distraction, it might even be worth keeping a pen and some paper handy during the call itself so that you can make notes on the fly.

4. Don't speak too quickly.

During any sort of interview, it's easy to let your nerves get the better of you and speak too quickly to be understood. Before responding to each question, take a breath and remind yourself to answer slowly, steadily, and clearly. You'll come off a lot better for it, and the interviewer won't have to ask you to repeat yourself.

5. Be concise.

Just as it's important to try not to talk too fast, it's also important not to talk too much. Waffling on needlessly won't endear you to your potential employer - it's never fun to sit through a long, rambling answer, and it's even worse when you're on the phone and the physical cues we discussed earlier aren't present to make the monologue more engaging. If you really want to impress, answer each question in as few words as possible (while still making your point clear each time).

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As much as we might all like to think that we are immaculately impartial when it matters – such as when we are leading a HR team recruiting for a position – the fact of the matter is that we are human and therefore as prone to bias, whether inadvertent or otherwise, as anyone else.

There have certainly been enough signs of that down the years. One controversial report cited a few years ago by The Telegraph, for instance, suggested some bias among recruitment agencies against black and ethnic minority candidates.

Meanwhile, a recent BBC Inside Out study found that a jobseeker with an English-sounding name was offered three times more interviews than a candidate with a Muslim name, despite the two CVs that were sent out detailing the same level of qualifications and experience.

So what are some of the forms of bias from which your own hiring team could be suffering?

1.       Confirmation bias

We’ve all probably had times when we’ve glossed over news articles containing facts that don’t comply with our political views, while remembering and agreeing with those that do.

Well, a similar thing happens in recruitment – you might have certain preconceived views about a candidate and seek out information in their CV and at interview to confirm those pre-existing beliefs, while discounting any information that goes against those beliefs.

2.       Overconfidence effect

This term refers to when a person’s subjective confidence in their judgements outweighs their objective accuracy. You may be overly confident, for example, that you always make the right hiring decision whenever you go by gut instinct.

This form of bias often originates from confirmation bias – you may remember when relying on your gut instinct led to a great hire, but not when it resulted in disaster.

3.      Similarity attraction effect

This is the tendency for people to look more favourably upon and seek out others who are similar to them. In the recruitment context, this may manifest in viewing candidates who have the same hobbies and interests as you or support the same football team more positively.

That might not be such a great problem if you’re drawn to people with a similarly strong work ethic to you. However, all too many hiring managers can be swayed by factors that have nothing to do with on-the-job performance.

4.      Halo effect

Do you presume that just because a given candidate is good in one way – for instance, is friendly and agreeable – they’ll also be good in other ways, such as in the sense of possessing the right technical skills for the role?

You may think you would never view candidates in such a way. However, many hiring managers fall into the trap of liking a candidate so much that they fail to carry out the required objective analysis of their job-related skills and abilities.

5.       Illusory correlation

If you’ve been asking those wacky interview questions that seemingly have nothing to do with the actual responsibilities of the role – such as “Show me 10 uses of a pencil” or “Which piece of fruit would you be?” – you might want to ask yourself whether you are suffering from illusory correlation bias.

This is the tendency to perceive a relationship between things – such as people, events or behaviours – even when such a relationship doesn’t exist. There is no evidence that ‘weird’ interview questions like the above, for instance, actually predict job performance.

How can such biases be eliminated?

Many ways have been tried of minimising bias in the recruitment process. Name blind CVs have become increasingly popular among certain big employers, while the use of video interviews in the early stages of screening can also help to offset discrimination by asking the same questions of every candidate.

Another way of helping to ensure that hiring decisions are not made due to personal or cultural bias is to keep a record of the reasons why candidates were rejected. This can be a good form of both internal and client feedback, and certain patterns in your HR analytics may show signs of bias.

It’s impossible to completely eliminate any trace of bias from your firm’s approach to hiring. Nonetheless, by bearing all of the above in mind, your company can maximise the likelihood of making the most impartial and informed decisions when seeking to fill its science jobs.

Why not click through to learn more about the varied recruitment solutions that we provide to our employer clients here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, including candidate screening?

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