Today’s employers don’t exactly lack appreciation of the need for employee engagement – 48% of respondents to one recent Deloitte survey cited it as “very important”. However, a 2015 report from Red Letter Days for Business stated that only just over a third of employees in Britain – 36% - were “highly engaged”.

Perhaps part of the problem stopping many organisations both within and outside the science sectors from boosting the engagement levels of their employees is an inability to recognise such engagement in the first place.

Here are some of the common signs of a lack of engagement – as well as of high levels of engagement – in your staff.  

Signs of a disengaged employee

Where do we start with all of the ways to spot a disengaged employee? You may notice that they only do a bare minimum amount and standard of work, completing assignments in a manner that is sloppy or only just “good enough”. It suggests an employee who isn’t much interested in the consequences of such low standards for them or their company.

A worker with poor levels of engagement may also avoid involvement in team activities, although it is important here not to confuse an apparent lack of interest with a tendency towards introversion. Some of your staff members are likely to prefer working quietly on their own, which is fine, but showing a complete lack of support to colleagues or disgruntlement when asked to participate in group initiatives is a different matter.  

A disengaged employee is also much more likely to complain about their work and blame others for their mistakes. It is vital here to consider potentially legitimate grievances, such as your employee being overworked or not being allowed by the culture of your company to make errors. By encouraging your employees to admit honest mistakes instead of shaming them for occasionally getting things wrong, you can make them less fearful and help to boost their engagement and performance levels.

So, how do you know you have an engaged worker?

A truly engaged employee is, of course, the opposite of many of these characteristics. They are employees who take the initiative instead of doing the bare minimum, motivate instead of complain, and easily concentrate on their tasks instead of losing focus.

Such an employee is also likely to own up to their mistakes out of a wish to learn from them, collaborate with their co-workers and love their company instead of looking for a new role elsewhere.

With Millennials especially inclined to ‘job hop’ – two in three of them signalling a wish to leave their present employment by 2020, according to the 2016 Deloitte Millennial Survey – bolstering employee engagement to cultivate employee loyalty will only become all the more crucial for science employers in the years ahead.

Talk to us about your talent sourcing challenges

As all of the above indicates, recruiting staff who represent a good fit for your science organisation’s culture isn’t all that you have to do to ensure high levels of engagement. However, it could certainly have a role in the prevention and mitigation of employee retention headaches in the years to come.

Whether your firm is involved in the pharmaceutical, engineering, medical device or any other science or technology sector, and whatever your other specialised talent sourcing requirements may be, our bespoke staffing solutions help to ensure you have the best possible employees adding value to your business. Make Hyper Recruitment Solutions your dependable science recruitment partner. 

It can’t be denied that we are in a very social media-oriented world these days – indeed, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), a whopping 91% of online adults aged 16-24 use social networks.

However, while social media undoubtedly brings you many opportunities to present yourself to great advantage when seeking science jobs, it also brings very real risks to your online reputation.

We’ve probably all heard stories about that relative, friend or friend of a friend who lost or struggled to get a job due to that controversial tweet or compromising Facebook photo. So, can you do to ‘clean up’ your social media presence for job seeking?

Take more control over profile privacy

The most popular social networks tend to offer all manner of settings for controlling the privacy of what we share. However, many of us simply leave the settings at their defaults, not realising how much we might be sharing with the whole world. 

Facebook makes it easy for you to check how public your profile content is – just head to your profile, click the ‘...’ at the top and then select ‘View As...’ to see what your profile looks like to a random viewer. You may find yourself shocked and hastily deleting cringeworthy past posts.

As for future content you post, it’s a good rule of thumb to presume everything you share will be public unless you have altered the settings – whether on an account or post-by-post basis – to restrict its audience.  

Pay particular attention to your photos

Research reported in the Daily Mail found that “unflattering photographs” topped the list of Britons’ common Internet regrets, followed by “raucous, drunken photos”. So for your social media clean up, you are going to have to go through your photos.

The 2,000 social media users quizzed by Custard Online Marketing also admitted to thinking twice about “vain selfies”, “photos of me, doing things I shouldn’t have done” and “photos of me in skimpy clothing/underwear”.

If all of the above suggests anything, it’s that we certainly care about how the images we share online affect how others perceive us. If that’s the case, you can certainly expect science recruitment agencies and employers to care about how your own image would reflect on them, so you should take the time to monitor your photos.

While it is often now possible on social media to control other people’s ability to tag you in photos, that doesn’t mean the photos don’t exist. So if you see an image that you wish to have removed, ask the person who posted it or get in touch with that social network’s support team.

Regularly Google yourself

You can almost guarantee that someone – whether a potential employer, friend, family member or acquaintance – has Googled your name in the past. What will a science employer see if they Google your name right now? Is there anything – including in the video and images sections – that might deter them from giving you an offer?

This is why you should routinely Google yourself to ensure that your online presence remains squeaky clean, not least as there may be content posted about you on other social networks.

Again, if you see something that might not be acceptable, you may be able to have it removed simply by appealing to whoever first posted it. On other occasions, that may not be possible, but there’s no harm in trying.

With one People Management report suggesting that about a third of employers have rejected candidates on the basis of their social media profile, it’s clear that this isn’t an aspect of your online presence you can overlook.

While having your social media clean up, it’s also vital to ensure you have the right science recruitment agency by your side to assist you with your job search. Contact Hyper Recruitment Solutions now about our Candidate Commitment that outlines what we can do to help you find your dream science role.  

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