‘Company culture’ may be an elusive thing to define at times, but neither employers nor candidates are in any doubt as to its importance.

A survey cited in The New York Times found that eight in 10 employers worldwide considered ‘cultural fit’ to be their top hiring priority. Meanwhile, ‘people and culture fit’ was the top thing that Millennials looked for in an employer, according to research cited in Harvard Business Review, above even ‘career potential’ and ‘work/life balance’.

So, once you have undergone all of the stress of applying for science jobs, passing through the interview and then finally securing your dream role, how can you ensure you are that ‘cultural fit’ your employer is likely to desire so much?

Thoroughly research the organisation

The more you know about the culture of your employer before you walk through its doors, the more proactive you can be in adapting to and embodying that culture – so be sure to do your homework well in advance.

Have you discussed the company culture with the contacts that you already have within the organisation, such as the HR staff that interviewed and hired you? Do your friends have any contacts that have worked for the company before and can give you some tips?

The Internet is also a good place to research companies, but be careful here – with Glassdoor reviews being anonymous, you can never be completely sure as to their authenticity. It may therefore be better to thoroughly immerse yourself in your new employer’s website first, paying particular attention to any ‘vision’ or ‘mission statement’ pages.

Take an open approach

It can take a while to fully acclimatise to the culture of a new employer, and organisations tend to be understanding of this. Indeed, in your early days, you should focus just as much on becoming accustomed to the company’s culture and people as you do on the work itself.

Be observant, and don’t be afraid to ask questions if necessary, of co-workers as well as your boss. Make any notes that you need to make of people’s names, job titles and contact details, as forgetting this information will be much more embarrassing later on than it will be during your first days and weeks at the company.

Maintain engagement over time

Don’t presume that you are automatically embedded into your company’s culture once the first week, month or even quarter has passed. The truth is that fitting in with the culture of your new employer will require continual effort, not least as culture naturally shifts over time with changes in workload and priorities.

So, take every opportunity that you can, even when you have spent a year or more in your new position, to ingrain yourself further into the culture of the company, such as by attending and participating in any weekly meetings, annual conferences and holiday parties.

The more steps that you can take to fit into the culture of your employer, the less likely you are to be among the 89% of hiring failures – according to one Forbes article from a few years ago – that are attributable to poor cultural fit.    

Are you looking to partner with a science recruitment agency with the strongest track record in enabling ambitious people like you to secure the best science jobs? If so, simply get in touch with Hyper Recruitment Solutions today, or read more about the many sectors in which we have hiring expertise.   

The pharmaceutical sector is one of the principal ones that we serve here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, with many employment experts in this field among our staff.

There’s also no question that the industry is a diverse, complex and potentially highly rewarding one for new recruits, with even starter pharmacologists typically earning between £25,000 and £28,000 a year, according to the National Careers Service.

But what do you need to know if you are to break into the sector for the first time?

First of all, make sure you have the right skills

There is a wide range of skills that will require in order to succeed in the pharmaceutical industry. These include strong IT skills, encompassing data retrieval and analysis, as well as good communication skills for giving presentations and writing papers and reports.

You will also need to be able to solve problems and come up with creative solutions in experiments, work collaboratively in multidisciplinary teams and organise yourself and manage your time well. Leadership potential is another key requirement.

What qualifications are necessary?

Although it isn’t unheard-of for school leavers to secure pharmaceutical jobs – according to the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) – this is not common and further career progress would depend on the possession of higher qualifications.

To stand the best chance of securing your first pharmaceutical role, you are likely to need a degree in pharmacology, although entry may be possible with a degree in another scientific subject such as biochemistry, neuroscience, microbiology or physiology.

For employment at the major pharmaceutical companies that receive an especially high level of interest from candidates, a relevant postgraduate qualification such as a pharmacology MSc or PhD may be essential, or at least highly advantageous.

What is the role of work experience?

Work experience can be invaluable for enabling you to see what life in the pharmaceutical industry is really like, as well as to talk to those already in the sector and start making useful contacts. The presence of work experience on your CV will also show to employers that you have a genuine interest in working in the sector.

Finding a relevant placement can be extremely difficult if you are under 16, but not impossible, with some pharmaceutical firms happy to provide local students with experience in an office.

If you are 16-18, you may be able to secure a one-week or two-week work experience placement during school holidays. However, such opportunities are rarely advertised, so you will almost certainly need to get in touch with companies directly.

When you are considering university courses, it is strongly advisable to choose a course that offers a ‘year in industry’ – also sometimes referred to as a sandwich or industrial placement year. If such a placement year is not possible, it’s a good idea to aim to obtain work experience during the long summer holidays.

How can Hyper Recruitment Solutions help?

When you are looking to secure that all-important first role in pharmacology, the assistance of the right science recruitment agency can be invaluable. Hyper Recruitment Solutions has long been that agency for a wide range of individuals seeking science jobs, with a high level of expertise in relation to the pharmaceutical sector.

Talk to our experts today about how we can serve you with our broad range of services geared towards the needs of candidates. 

User Menu

Month List