If conventional wisdom is to believed, catching the attention of science recruitment agencies and employers with your job application is easy: you get your CV into shape, find the most relevant science jobs being advertised and then send through your application with a presentable cover letter.

However, a downside of such conventional wisdom is that it is conventional, meaning that everyone is doing similar things. If you really want to turbo-charge your search for a suitable new science role, you may therefore want to try the following tips.

1. Show your vulnerability

Don't necessarily presume that you have to turn yourself into an arrogant superstar to land your dream pharmaceutical, clinical or medical role.

Instead, consider showing your vulnerability, getting in touch with those who you would like to work with, expressing your admiration for what they do and asking questions. It can be a great way to start building up relationships that could help you when a vacancy next opens up.

2. Don't necessarily follow your passion

Career seekers have long been told to "follow their passion", but it isn't always entirely robust. Many people in science jobs that they now love may have only come to love it after developing their competency and experience in the role over time.

3. Don't obsess over finding your dream job right now

This advice is especially useful to those in the early stages of a science career. Whether in R&D, bioinformatics, regulatory affairs or any other field, given the unglamorous nature of most entry-level positions, your focus shouldn't necessarily be on finding a job that you love right now.

Instead, envisage what the role has the potential to become if you work hard over the next five years. That's the post that you are effectively applying for.

4. Contact the decision-maker directly

Those who watched the Will Smith film The Pursuit of Happyness may especially appreciate this pointer. Sometimes, it is all too easy for applications for science jobs to disappear into a black hole. Instead, tactfully and respectfully approach the person who will actually be making the decision whether to hire you.

5. Be your desired employer's biggest fan

If there's a specific science employer that you would like to work for, mark yourself out as a brand loyalist - someone who is always defending the company in the blogosphere or feting its expertise or services to friends or on social media.

Ambitious firms love employees who love them - so you may just find yourself first in the queue when the next perfectly-tailored position arises.   

Across the full glut of science jobs for which one may conceivably apply - ranging from biotechnology and pharmaceutical to engineering and R&D roles - there is the need to get one's CV noticed.

As much as we may wish to think that we are recruited on the basis of our skills and experiences, without a sufficiently eye-catching CV, such is the intense level of competition for the most desirable roles that it is doubtful we would get hired at all.

Here are five of the best ways to keep eyes lingering on your resume.

1. Mirror the language used in the job posting

With studies indicating that the average recruiter spends just a few seconds considering a CV before accepting or rejecting it, chances are that your CV will only be scanned quite quickly.

You should make the recruiter's job easier, therefore, by including the very terms that are present throughout their initial job posting, to make it even clearer how your skills and experience relate to the role.

2. Avoid clich├ęd terms

So common are terms like 'team player', 'innovative', 'results focused' and 'highly qualified' on the average CV, that they have been reduced to meaningless fluff from the perspective of many hiring managers.

If you can't use more distinctive, unfamiliar terms, at least provide immediate, live examples of how you possess such characteristics, to prevent a bored reader simply drifting to the next CV in the pile.

3. Adapt your resume to each position

This is a source of consternation for so many science recruitment agencies, to the extent that many would regard it as disrespectful not to modify a CV for their specific position.

You might do this by re-arranging what appears on your CV, perhaps grouping your traits by skill area or job function. Alternatively, you might have a reverse chronological CV, which can show how you have gathered competencies relevant to your new position over time.

4. Explain any employment gaps

Many recruiters for science jobs will reject a CV as soon as they see an unaccounted-for gap, preferring to save their limited interviewing time for candidates who don't seem to have something to hide.

It is therefore a better bet to properly explain why you may have been unemployed for a certain period of time, and how you nonetheless used that time productively.

5. Don't be afraid to brag

Your CV is not supposed to be modest. It is there to quickly make a positive impression on a complete stranger, so you should tell them everything great about you that means they need to hire you right now - from relevant previous jobs to coveted awards and big promotions.

If you can convince science recruitment agencies that you are something special, they will be much more likely to urgently call you to interview - whatever the science role for which you are applying.


Whether you are still considering your university options, have completed a PhD or have a long track record in a particular science field behind you, choosing from the vast range of possible science jobs can be an intimidating and overwhelming process.

With popular sectors ranging from immunology and pharmacology to molecular biology and clinical, and with functions within those sectors encompassing clinical research, quality assurance, research and development (R&D) and many more, it would be too difficult for us to give even a brief overview of your possible science career options here.

What we can do, however, is give you some pointers on choosing the science post that would best suit your own background, interests and motivations.

Figuring out your skills, values and interests

Various assessments exist that should help you to clarify your own personal characteristics and how these may lend themselves to various science jobs. These include the National Careers Service's Action Plan tool, as well as the Career Planner accessible through the graduate careers site, Prospects.


More informal ways of determining the best science career direction for you include simply asking yourself what areas at science most interest you and which you are best at, as well as what lifestyle you want and what you actually desire from your longer-term career.

What to consider when comparing jobs

Once you have a reasonable idea of the above, you will be able to begin your job hunt or consider the most appropriate academic course.

When you are thinking about your science job options, you will need to take into account such factors as entry requirements, employment outlook, the job description, salary and conditions and the scope to develop the job.

Is the role that interests you a good match to what you learned about yourself through tools and techniques like the above, and is the job reasonably attainable right now? If not, what do you need to do to have a realistic chance of entering this particular science career?

Imagining yourself on the job

Even having the right skills and experience, however, matters little if you would not actually enjoy the role on a day-to-day basis.

To ascertain this, ask yourself whether the employer would be a good match to your own values, as well as whether the job itself would be rewarding both now and some time into the future, based on your past experiences and motivations. Is this a job that you would even do for free?

Deciding on the right science role entails much serious thought about what matters to you in a job, as well as your likelihood of obtaining work in the field that interests you and the potential for career growth.

As leading science recruitment specialists here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we are always happy to advise those still contemplating the right science career for them - as well as, if appropriate, match them to a suitable role. 

As a leading and highly compliant recruitment company, here at Hyper Recruitment Solutions, we take pride in matching those seeking science jobs with the most rewarding roles.

While science is naturally a field in which the range of roles is extremely varied - even jobs with the same or similar titles potentially carrying very different responsibilities and calling upon rather distinct skills - the below five roles are some of the most sought-after across science currently.

Qualified Person (QP)

European regulations dictate that there be a Qualified Person (QP) to decide on batch releases of medicinal products. A given batch cannot be certified for release until it has first been thoroughly verified that it was manufactured in accordance with relevant GMP (good manufacturing practice) regulations, which necessitates a wide range of responsibilities for the QP.

Regulatory affairs officer

Also known as a regulatory affairs specialist or manager, a person in this post bridges the gap between companies and regulatory authorities, ensuring the manufacture and distribution of products in line with relevant legislation. Duties typically range from the study of scientific and legal documents to the planning and undertaking of regulatory inspections and product trials.

Clinical research manager

Clinical research managers are given overall responsibility within pharmaceutical or medical fields for preparing protocols and case report forms, the approval of ethics committees and the management of clinical trials. They may also be expected to provide clinical trial materials and ensure that trials are smoothly monitored, through the identification and management of qualified staff and the establishment of suitable audit procedures.

Validation engineer

Validation engineers play a key role in the development and manufacturing process for products ranging from pharmaceuticals to cars, through their measurement, analysis and calibration of the equipment and processes necessary to ensure only the highest quality products.

Such engineers are also required in such sectors as aerospace, biotechnology and computer software, with their duties including testing, the overseeing of other validation technicians' work and the establishment of validation standards.

Packaging technologist

A post for those with plenty of design flair and a passion for technology, packaging technologists are involved in the design and development of product packaging. Working with manufacturers and other professionals, packaging technologists operate under time and budgetary constraints to deliver a finished packaging design.

Such goods as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, food and drink, toiletries and household cleaning products all need to be packaged, and a packaging technologist's duties typically include the production of sample packaging, the running of production trials and tests and the creation of artwork in conjunction with packaging designers.

Although the best jobs in these fields can be scarce and the level of competition extremely fierce, Hyper Recruitment Solutions can put jobseekers in touch with the most advantageous opportunities for their burgeoning science careers, in keeping with its status as one of the principal science recruitment agencies. 

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